Citing Evidence and Building Vocabulary: “The Exterminator” | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M4:U1:L4

Citing Evidence and Building Vocabulary: “The Exterminator”

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite text-based evidence to support an analysis of informational text. (RI.6.1)
  • I can use resources to build my vocabulary. (L.6.6)

Supporting Targets

  • I can identify the argument and specific claims in a video about DDT.
  • I can determine the evidence used to support the argument and claims in a video about DDT.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Learning from Frightful's Perspective: Chapter 4 (from homework)
  • Text Walk Scavenger Hunt recording form
  • Scientific vocabulary identified in "The Exterminator"

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

     A.  Engaging the Reader: Learning from Frightful's Perspective (10 minutes)

     B.  Unpacking Learning Targets (3 minutes)

2.  Work Time

     A.  Exploring the Text: Text Feature Scavenger Hunt and First Read of  "The Exterminator"  (15 minutes)

     B.  Getting the Gist: Second Read of "The Exterminator" (10 minutes)

     C.  Vocabulary: Introduction to Scientific Terminology (5 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

     A.  Exit Ticket: Adding Scientific Terminology to the Scientific Word Wall (3 minutes)

4.  Homework

     A.  Read Chapter 5, "Frightful Peregrinates." Complete Learning from Frightful's Perspective: Chapter 5.

  • This lesson continues the routine for discussions and vocabulary development for Frightful's Mountain. Build on existing norms and routines for collaborative work in your classroom. Discussion is vital while students work with text.
  • This lesson continues the routine for discussions and vocabulary development for Frightful's Mountain. Build on existing norms and routines for collaborative work in your classroom. Discussion is vital while students work with text.
  • Students work in triads and share responses to the Chapter 4, "The Wilderness Tests the Eyases" focus question. Share new "Words I Found Difficult" and add to their vocabulary. Cold call students to share their Chapter 4 responses with the whole class. This routine helps students engage independently and immediately, and it also helps students develop understanding of the text.
  • Students are introduced to the article "The Exterminator" by focusing on the text features. This helps students get the gist of this article. The use of text features helps increase understanding of an author's argument, which is particularly important as students become more independent in identifying arguments, claims, and evidence. These are skills the students will use in future lessons to make their own arguments and claims supported with evidence.
  • This lesson includes a read-aloud first reading of "The Exterminator," followed by a second reading. During the second reading, students read closely for scientific words.
  • In advance:
  • Create a Scientific Word Wall for scientific words. Include category headings so students can add words to the Scientific Word Wall in future lessons. Categories include: Chemicals, Disease, Processes, Sciences/Scientists, Living Things, Other.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

text feature; gist, scientific terminology, captions, sidebars, diagrams; exterminator, pesticide, malaria, parasite, vector(s) (1); insecticide, ecologist, accumulated, resistant (3); toxic, agriculture,  environment, eradicating (4)

Materials

  • Frightful's Mountain (book; one per student)
  • Dictionaries (one per triad)
  • Equity sticks
  • "The Exterminator" article (one per student)
  • Document camera
  • Text Walk Scavenger Hunt recording form (one per student)
  • Scientific Word Wall (new; teacher-created on chart paper)
  • Sticky notes (four or five per student)
  • Learning from Frightful's Perspective: Chapter 5 (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Learning from Frightful's Perspective (10 minutes)

  • Be sure students have their text, Frightful's Mountain.
  • Invite students to join their triads. They should share their responses to the focus question for Chapter 4, "The Wilderness Tests the Eyases." Remind students of their focus question for the chapter:

* "What 'signs in nature' signal the falcon that it is time to migrate?" 

  • Each student should share one signal in nature that peregrine falcons use to know when it's time to migrate and include evidence found in the text. Listen for: "The days become shorter," "the temperatures are changing," "their food is diminishing or become in short supply as they migrate."
  • After sharing these signals, direct students to share one of the words from Frightful's Mountain that they added to their "Words I Found Difficult." Members of triads should then collaborate to determine the meanings of the words. Both dictionaries and context clues may be used. Add definitions to the Chapter 4 "Words I Found Difficult." Include page numbers where the words were found in Frightful's Mountain.
  • After sharing these signals, direct students to share one of the words from Frightful's Mountain that they added to their "Words I Found Difficult." Members of triads should then collaborate to determine the meanings of the words. Both dictionaries and context clues may be used. Add definitions to the Chapter 4 "Words I Found Difficult." Include page numbers where the words were found in Frightful's Mountain.
  • Circulate to observe students' shared responses and written responses. Make note of students who begin work easily and collaborate with triad members and those who may need support.
  • Ask students to stop where they are with their responses. Cold call students to share responses with evidence to the focus question with the whole group.
  • Congratulate students for working collaboratively and practicing using evidence from the text.
  • Some students may benefit from teacher support to discuss signals for migration and provide evidence to support it.
  • Posting sentence starters for class discussions gives students an entry point for clearly conveying their responses. Consider posting phrases such as: "One signal that peregrine falcons use is ..." and "On page #__, I noticed ..."
  • Reviewing academic vocabulary words benefits all students developing academic language.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes) Direct students' attention to the learning targets.

  • Use a total participation technique, such as equity sticks, to invite students to read today's learning targets:

* "I can get the gist of the informational article 'The Exterminator.'"

* "I can collect scientific vocabulary by reading 'The Exterminator.'"

  • Tell students that today they will practice close reading skills by reading for the gist and looking for scientific terminology in "The Exterminator."

Work Time

Work Time

A.Exploring the Text: Text Feature Scavenger Hunt and First Read of "The Exterminator" (15 minutes)

  •  Tell students that they will take a "text walk" of the article. "The Exterminator" has several text features: pictures and illustrations with captions, sidebars, and a diagram that provides information about the life cycle of the parasite that causes malaria. Students will read these in Lesson 6 and examine how information in text features contributes to the author's argument.
  • Explain that authors use text features for specific purposes. These features often add to the author's argument in a different way than the main article.
  • Distribute "The Exterminator" to the students.
  • Use a document camera to introduce terms for the text features used in the article and to point out examples of the different text features. (These terms are used on the Text Walk Scavenger Hunt recording form that students complete with a partner.)
  • Tell students they should look through the entire article to locate different text features and respond to the questions. Remind students to refer to the explanations of each feature to help them complete the search.
  • Give students 5 minutes to complete the search, then invite them to share their findings with the class. Ask students:

* "After reviewing these different text features, why do you think they might be important to an article?"

B.  Getting the Gist: Second Read of "The Exterminator" (10 minutes)

  • Explain that because the article is about disease and the use of pesticides, it includes many scientific words. This type of reading requires effort and concentration.
  • Building knowledge of science words makes reading easier and more engaging. It also provides a foundation for understanding important issues. "The Exterminator" has many vocabulary words particularly connected to life science. Tell students that they will dig into the scientific vocabulary in this article a little later in this lesson.
  • Invite students to reread "The Exterminator" independently. As students reread, and annotate the article for the gist, invite students to look for words related to science. In each section of the article, ask students to identify scientific words. Students circle or highlight words in the article or record words on paper.
  • While students are looking for scientific words, circulate to observe which students may need guided support.

C. Vocabulary: Introduction to Scientific Terminology (5 minutes)

  • Introduce the Scientific Word Wall. Explain that students will encounter scientific terminology not only in "The Exterminator," but also in other informational texts, videos, and in Frightful's Mountain. To increase scientific knowledge, words will be added to the Scientific Word Wall throughout the module.
  • Distribute four or five sticky notes to each student. Ask students to share the scientific words they identified in the article with a partner. Partners should compare the words they circled, find common words, and write those words on the sticky notes. Students reread the words in context and try to determine the meaning of the word.
  • Invite students to look at the word categories on the Scientific Word Wall. Introduce each of the categories: Chemicals, Disease, Processes, Science/Scientist, Living Things, Other.
  • Model using the word categories by using words from the "The Exterminator." For example a chemical is DDT, a disease is malaria, a process is accumulate, a scientist is ecologist, a living things is parasite. 
  • Ask partners to discuss under which category their words might fit

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Exit Ticket: Adding Scientific Terminology to the Scientific Word Wall (3 minutes)

  • Ask pairs to add at least three of their scientific words to the Scientific Word Wall, placing their sticky notes with the words under the category heading that they feel best fits each word.
  • Preview homework.

Homework

Homework
  • Read Chapter 5, "Frightful Peregrinates." Complete Learning from Frightful's Perspective: Chapter 5.

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