Close Reading and Gathering Evidence from Frightful’s Mountain and “Welcome Back” | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M4:U1:L2

Close Reading and Gathering Evidence from Frightful’s Mountain and “Welcome Back”

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can identify the argument and specific claims in a text. (RI.6.8)
  • I can evaluate the argument and specific claims for sufficient evidence. (RI.6.8)

Supporting Targets

  • I can collect background information about peregrine falcons and pesticides.
  • I can use evidence from Frightful's Mountain to collect and share information about peregrine falcons.Mountain.
  • I can get the gist of the informational article "Welcome Back.".

Ongoing Assessment

  • Learning from Frightful's  Perspective
  • Chapter 2: Frightful Goes to Falcon School, Peregrine Falcon Facts
  • Learning from Frightful's Perspective: Chapter 2
  • Sticky note: Making Connections between Frightful's Mountain and "Welcome Back"

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

     A.  Jigsaw of "Learning from Frightful": Excerpts from Chapter 2 (15 minutes)

     B.  Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2.  Work Time

     A.  First Read of "Welcome Back": Read-aloud and Getting the Gist (10 minutes)

     B.  Second Read of "Welcome Back": Understanding Author's Focus and Finding Text-based Evidence about Peregrine Falcons and DDT (15 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

     A.  Making Connections between Frightful's Mountain, "Welcome Back," and Rachel Carson's Quote  (3minutes)

4.  Homework

     A.  Read Chapter 3, "The Eyases Get on Wing." Complete Learning from Frightful's Perspective Chapter 3.

  • This lesson uses the Jigsaw protocol (see Appendix) that will be used throughout the module. Students collaborate with peers to promote student engagement and learn about peregrine falcons.
  • Divide students into heterogeneous groups of four. Each group member is responsible for part of the chapter to read and record the learning on peregrine falcons. Then each member shares the learning with the others.
  • In advance: Prepare a Peregrine Falcon Facts anchor chart so facts can be added to the chart when students share theirs with the whole class. Post the Peregrine Falcon Facts anchor chart for students.
  • After the Jigsaw protocol, spend time deconstructing the learning targets with students. This gives them a clear vision for what learning will focus on for each lesson. This research-based strategy supports struggling learners the most. Using learning targets is also a powerful way to teach academic vocabulary.
  • This lesson reviews reading for the gist and gives students practice annotating informational texts.
  • During the read-aloud, students should look at the text and actively read in their heads. The teacher reads aloud slowly, fluently, and without interruption or explanation. This read-aloud process promotes fluency for students, who hear a strong reader read the text aloud with accuracy and expression and are simultaneously looking at and thinking about the words on the printed page.
  • Asking students to identify challenging vocabulary helps them monitor their understanding of a complex text. Students annotate the text by circling these words, providing a formative assessment for the teacher.
  • The lesson ends with making connections with the novel, informational text, and Rachel Carson's quote: "In nature nothing exists alone." This quote will be discussed in upcoming lessons. Consider displaying the quote in the room for all students to see.
  • Read "Welcome Back" to identify the focus, main idea, and text-based evidence to support learning on peregrine falcons and DDT.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

gist, annotate, pesticides, evidence;  

DDT, captivity, Endangered Species Act, aerie (22), nestlings (22), eyases (22), morsel (23), brooded (24), preened (27)

Materials

  • Frightful Goes to Falcon School, Peregrine Falcon Facts (one per student)
  • Peregrine Falcon Facts anchor chart (new; teacher-created; see Teaching Notes)
  • Frightful's Mountain (book; one per student)
  • "Welcome Back" article (one per student)
  • Document camera
  • Rachel Carson's quote (from Lesson 1; one to display)
  • Sticky notes (one per student)
  • Learning from Frightful's Perspective: Chapter 3 (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Jigsaw of "Learning from Frightful": Excerpts from Chapter 2 (15 minutes)

  • Remind students that they are going to work in triads throughout the module. Review group expectations with students.
  • Tell students they will work in groups of four. Ask them to count off by fours. Distribute Chapter 2: Frightful Goes to Falcon School, Peregrine Falcon Facts to each student.
  • Read the directions aloud and address any clarifying questions.
  • Tell students they will have 5 minutes to identify three facts about their topic. If they finish early, they should challenge themselves to find more than three.
  • Students should also refer to their homework, Learning from Frightful's Perspective: Chapter 2 to get additional information.
  • Circulate and support students that may have questions or need help identifying information on their topic.
  • Invite students to finish writing. Tell students they each will share what they learned about peregrine falcons with their other group members. As students present the new  information, group members should add this information to their Chapter 2: Frightful Goes to Falcon School, Peregrine Falcon Facts.
  • While building the Peregrine Falcon Facts anchor chart, discuss and define the vocabulary words aerie, nestlings, brooded, eyases, morsel, and preened.
  • The Jigsaw of Frightful's Mountain has domain-specific vocabulary that is important to understanding the text.
  • Discussion is critical to helping struggling readers build this vocabulary.
  • Consider assigning the topics on the fact sheet.  Some students could be assigned the topic with more or less pages to read, depending on their readiness.
  • Many students will benefit from seeing the Chapter 2: Frightful Goes to Falcon School, Peregrine Falcon Facts sheet posted on the board or via a document camera as directions are read.
  • Consider pairing ELL students who speak the same home language when discussion of complex content is required. This can allow students to have more meaningful discussions and clarify points in their native language.
  • Some students may need more frequent checks for understanding and guided practice when first annotating text for the gist.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets  (2 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the learning targets. Remind students that learning targets are helpful tools in understanding their own learning goals. Targets will be part of every lesson.
  • Read aloud as students read along with today's learning targets:

* "I can collect background information about peregrine falcons and pesticides."

* "I can use evidence from Frightful's Mountain to collect and share information about peregrine falcons."

* "I can get the gist of the informational article 'Welcome Back.'"

  • Ask:

* "Now that you have seen the learning targets for this lesson, what do you think you will be doing today?"

  • Listen for: "We will be learning more about peregrine falcons. We will be learning about pesticides."
  • Remind students that Frightful's Mountain is literary text. Tell them today they will be reading informational text to learn about peregrine falcons and DDT. Tell them DDT is a chemical pesticide.
  • Ask:

* "What do you think a chemical pesticide is?" 

  • If students do not know, tell them the suffix -cide means to kill or the act of killing. Listen for: "A toxic substance used to kill insects or pests." Tell students that something that specifically kills insects is called an insecticide. 
  •  Invite students to think about how Frightful's Mountain and DDT may be connected.

Work Time

Work Time

A.First Read of "Welcome Back": Read-aloud and Getting the Gist (10 minutes)

  • Be sure students are now sitting with their regular triads. Distribute the "Welcome Back" article to students. Use a document camera to display the text.
  • Tell students that they will read this article more than once. As usual, they will first read just to get the gist--to understand the basic sense of the text and to get an idea of where information is located for later use.
  • Invite students to read the text silently in their heads as you read aloud. Read slowly and fluently. Do not stop at this point to explain anything.
  • After the article is read, ask triads:

* "What is the gist, the basic sense of what this text is mostly about?"

  • Listen for: "The text is stating the peregrine falcon population almost disappeared because of DDT. To help the peregrine falcon population come back, scientists tried raising them in captivity. In 1974, the first peregrine falcons were released into the wild. Raising falcons in captivity had proved successful."
  • Ask triads to think, then discuss:

* "What does the author tell us about DDT?" Give students one minute to review the text to find evidence in the text about DDT.

  • Listen for: "DDT is a chemical that was used to kill insects destroying farmers' crops in the 1950s and 1960s."
  • Remind students that when text is challenging, it is often helpful to read smaller sections and to annotate or take notes in the margin to explain the author's ideas.

B. Second Read of "Welcome Back": Understanding Author's Focus and Finding Text-based Evidence about Peregrine Falcons and DDT (15 minutes)

  • Invite students to follow along as you reread the first four paragraphs aloud. Tell students you will model how to annotate this section of the text.
  • Use a document camera. As you read the text aloud, circle unfamiliar words such as "perched," "starling," "stoop," and "agile." Underline facts about the peregrine falcon's vision, speed, and method of capturing prey. Examples of facts to underline could be: "keen vision," "head pointed down, wings tucked, and feet tucked in," "speeds up to 200 m.p.h.," "black mustache and head and white cheeks," "long pointed wings permit him to easily shift positions."
  • Ask triads to discuss the vocabulary underlined, and to write a phrase in the margin to summarize the facts about the peregrine's dive. Remind the class to use context clues to determine word meaning. Pause to give students time.
  • Invite students to share their definitions and phrases.
  • Model writing phrases students share in the margin. Examples could be: "sharp vision and streamlined body when capturing prey," "fly up to 200 m.p.h.," "long, pointed wings to easily change positions in flight."
  • Next, ask triads to annotate Paragraphs 5 and 6 about DDT. Remind students to circle difficult vocabulary and underline informational facts about DDT. Ask them to write a sentence or phrase about the main idea of the two paragraphs in the margin. Pause to give students time.
  • Circulate to encourage students, making sure students underline key points and not all text. If some students need support, ask them to read one paragraph and tell you what it was about. Encourage them to write a summarized sentence or phrase in the margin.  Make a note of students needing support.  
  • Refocus the class whole group. Invite triads to share their unfamiliar words and their context clues that helped with definitions.
  • Listen for: captivity and DDT. Captivity means not able to be free. DDT is a chemical pesticide used to kill insects.
  • Invite triads to share information with their group members about peregrine falcons and DDT from Paragraphs 5 and 6. Pause to give time.
  • Circulate and listen for responses. Provide support in finding the main point. Also, make note of students needing support in writing a summarized phrase or sentence.
  • Bring the class back together. Cold call triads to share a sentence or a phrase they wrote to summarize the two paragraphs. Also, ask them to share difficult words and definitions.
  • Listen for: "In the 1950s and 1960s, farmers used DDT to kill insects destroying their crops. Birds ate insects with DDT on them, and peregrine falcons fed on these birds. DDT built up in the body and caused the eggs laid to have thinner shells. Thinner shells resulted in cracking and chicks could not hatch. Peregrine falcons were raised in captivity."
  • Use the document camera to model writing notes in the margin.
  • Direct students to read and annotate the last two paragraphs independently. Pause and give students time.
  • Circulate and support students who needed help from the previous annotating.
  • Reconvene the class. Ask triads to share their unfamiliar words and facts about peregrine falcons and DDT with their group.
  • Invite volunteers to share their words and definitions with the class. Also, ask students to share the notes they wrote in the margin.
  • Listen for: banned and Endangered Species Act. Three things helped bring the population back: peregrines were raised in captivity; in 1972, DDT was banned; and the Endangered Species Act provided protection for these birds.
  • Congratulate students for building knowledge on annotating challenging informational text and working cooperatively with their triads. Tell them in the weeks to come they will learn more about peregrine falcons and DDT.
  • Display Rachel Carson's quote: "In nature nothing exists alone." Ask students to read it silently to themselves.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A.  Making Connections between Frightful's Mountain,

  • "Welcome Back," and Rachel Carson's Quote (3 minutes)
  • Distribute a sticky note to each student. Display Rachel Carson's quote.
  • Say, "Now that you have read Frightful's Mountain Chapter 2, and the Rachel Carson quote, 'In nature nothing exists alone,' and the article 'Welcome Back,' think: What connections are there between the quote and the novel? What can you infer about what's to come in the next weeks of study?"
  • Invite students to write their thoughts on their sticky note, and to come up and post their ideas on the front board.
  • Once students have posted their ideas, think aloud the connections you see.
  • For example, you might say: "I see many students wrote about nature in their response. We are going to be reading, thinking, and talking a lot about the natural world in the weeks to come. I also see many of you have written about DDT. We will be reading, thinking, and talking about DDT and other ways humans affect the natural world. In the next several weeks, we are going to keep coming back to the idea of the delicate balance between humans and the many parts of our natural world." 
  • Preview homework as needed; reinforce the routine of the structured notes. Remind students to do the following as they read:
  • Find at least three unfamiliar vocabulary words, and write the corresponding page number by each word.
  • Write your thoughts to the focus question, and find evidence, facts, or reasons from Chapter 3 to support your thinking.

Homework

Homework
  • Read Chapter 3. "The Eyases Get on Wing." Complete Learning from Frightful's Perspective: Chapter 3.

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