Using Multiple Resources of Information: Creating a Cascading Consequences Chart about DDT and Practicing a Fishbowl Discussion | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M4:U1:L10

Using Multiple Resources of Information: Creating a Cascading Consequences Chart about DDT and Practicing a Fishbowl Discussion

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can interpret information presented in different media and formats. (SL.6.2)
  • I can explain how new information connects to a topic, text, or issue I am studying. (SL.6.2)
  • I can use my experience knowledge of language and logic to address problems and advocate persuasively. (SL.6.2a)
  • I can write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. (W.6.1)
  • I can use evidence from a variety of grade-appropriate texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.6.9)

Supporting Targets

  • I can use multiple resources to create a Cascading Consequences chart about the use of DDT.
  • I can practice the skills and expectations for a Fishbowl discussion.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Learning from Frightful's Perspective: Chapter 9 (from homework)
  • Peregrine Falcon Facts anchor chart
  • Benefits of DDT and Harmful Consequences Cascading Consequences charts
  • Fishbowl Feedback checklist
  • Exit Ticket: Fishbowl Successes and Fishbowl Goals

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

     A.  Engaging the Reader: Learning From Frightful's Perspective (8 minutes)

     B.  Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2. Work Time

     A.  Creating Cascading Consequences Charts: Using Multiple Resources about DDT (20 minutes

     B.  Fishbowl Discussion: Cascading Consequences Chart about DDT (10 minutes )

3.  Closing and Assessment

     A.  Exit Ticket (5 minutes)

4. Homework

     A.  Read Chapter 10: "There Are Eggs and Trouble.

     B.  Complete Learning from Frightful's Perspective: Chapter 10.

  • As students work with their triads to respond to the Learning from Frightful's Perspective: Chapter 9 focus question and increase vocabulary knowledge, it is also an opportunity for students to focus on the setting in New York.
  • The increase of peregrine falcons in the state has occurred for reasons that include the banning of DDT in the U.S. and the interaction between people and the birds. Adding things such as maps, illustrations of birds, photos, and/or illustrations of bowstring bridges to expand the Peregrine Falcon Facts anchor chart provides an opportunity of connecting the book with the environment in which students live.
  • If a variety of resources and images are added to the anchor chart, encourage students to label images with glossary words and difficult words they have identified. Visual contributions to the anchor chart can increase participation, creativity, and understanding.
  • In Lesson 9, students were introduced to creating Cascading Consequences chart using information from Frightful's Mountain. In this lesson, students create Cascading Consequences charts about two different opinions concerning the use of DDT.
  • Students use information from the various sources they used in identifying arguments, claims, and evidence about the use of DDT. Students use this information to create one Cascading Consequences chart that explores the benefits of DDT and one that explores the harmful consequences of DDT.
  • Since students will continue to add to both of their Cascading Consequences charts in future lessons, it may be beneficial to have students use larger paper to create their charts.
  • To prepare for this lesson, students should have their copies of the articles they read, the graphic organizers for "Tracing an Argument," and the task cards they developed for identifying argument, claims, and evidence. These materials should be organized into the two categories: the Benefits of DDT and Harmful Consequences of DDT. This organization helps them use multiple sources to develop their ideas.
  • Today's Fishbowl discussion provides the opportunity for students to interpret and share the claims and evidence they have identified and documented. Teacher observation, student feedback, and self-reflection all provide opportunities to recognize success and identify areas to strengthen.
  • Post: Learning targets

Vocabulary

resources, cascading, consequences, fishbowl, discussion

Materials

  • Frightful's Mountain (book; one per student)
  • Map of Frightful's Mountain setting area (one for display)
  • Peregrine Falcon Facts anchor chart
  • Copies of articles: "Welcome Back," "The Exterminator," and "Rachel Carson: Sounding the Alarm on Pollution" (from previous lessons; one per student)
  • Tracing an Argument graphic organizers for John Stossel video (from Lesson 3; students' completed copies)
  • Tracing an Argument graphic organizers for "Double Whammy" from "The Exterminator" (from Lesson 5; students' completed copies)
  • Tracing an Argument graphic organizers for "Public Fear" from "The Exterminator" (from Lesson 7; students' completed copies)
  • Sidebar task cards for "Seriously Sick" from "The Exterminator" (from Lesson 6; students' completed copies) 
  • Sidebar task cards for "Killer Genes" from "The Exterminator" (from Lesson 6; students' completed copies).
  • Benefits of DDT Cascading Consequences chart (one per student)
  • Harmful Consequences of DDT Cascading Consequences chart (one per student)
  • Fishbowl Assessment (from Lesson 9; one per student)
  • Fishbowl Feedback sheets (one per student)
  • Exit Ticket: Fishbowl Successes and Fishbowl Goals (one per student)
  • Learning from Frightful's Perspective: Chapter 10 (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Learning from Frightful's Perspective (8 minutes)

  • Be sure students have their text, Frightful's Mountain. Invite students to join their triads to share their responses to the focus question for Chapter 9.
  • As students share where Frightful built her aerie, ask students to consider:

* "Where might that decision fit on your Cascading Consequences chart about Sam and Frightful?"

  • The second part of the focus question asks students to identify two things that are happening at Frightful's new home. One is that Frightful has just laid an egg. The other is that workers are about to begin repair on the bridge where Frightful is nesting. Tell students to use evidence from the last part of the chapter as they each share what they identified. Ask them to consider where those events might fit on their Cascading Consequences chart.
  • Encourage students to consider Frightful's survival and the interactions with people.
  • Ask students to share one of the words they added to their "Words I Found Difficult" with their triad (including the page number where the word is in the text). Encourage triads to collaborate and use context clues to determine the meaning of the words, and then add definitions to the Chapter 9 "Words I Found Difficult."
  • Circulate to observe students' shared responses and written responses. Make note of students who begin work easily and collaborate with triad members and those who may need support.
  • Ask students to stop where they are with their responses. Cold call on a few students to share responses with evidence to the focus question with the whole group. Use the document camera to show students a map of Frightful Mountain's setting area in New York State where Sam and Frightful live. Point out the West Delaware River where Frightful has built her aerie. Point out the Schoharie River where Chup nests. Show the connection of those rivers to the Hudson River where several nesting peregrine falcons have built their aeries on the bridges of that river.
  • Ask students to think about the interaction of those birds with the people of New York. Invite students to consider if there are benefits to the birds, people, and the environment.
  • As students continue with Frightful's Mountain, the challenges of balancing human needs and the needs of living things in the natural environment is evident. These same issues are important as students begin looking more closely at the use of DDT. Using Cascading Consequence charts are valuable ways to use new information to help with making decisions.
  • Consider adding a copy of the map to the Peregrine Falcon Facts anchor chart.
  • Set clear expectations that students read along with you. Hearing the text read and reading the learning targets will build fluency.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Read the learning targets aloud as the students read aloud with you:

* "I can use multiple resources to create a Cascading Consequences chart about the use of DDT."

* "I can practice the skills and expectations for a Fishbowl discussion."

  • Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

* "What words seem most important in these targets?"

  • Ask a few students to share. Focus on the words:

discussion--the act of talking about something with another person or a group of people : a conversation about something

fishbowl--a place or condition in which there is no privacy

resources--places or things that provides something useful

cascading--things that happen in a series or in stages and they affect the outcome or result

consequences--things that happen as a result of particular actions or set of conditions

  • Explain that they have been using different resources including videos, articles, and maps to learn about both benefits and consequences of DDT. Tell students as they use the information they have learned, it is helpful to organize and sort that knowledge to see what the results or consequences might be. Using a Cascading Consequences chart is a good way to assess the use of DDT.

Work Time

Work Time

A. Creating Cascading Consequences Charts: Using Multiple Resources about DDT (20 minutes

  • Tell students that today they will begin creating a Cascading Consequences chart about the use of DDT.
  • Distribute or instruct students to take out their materials from previous lessons:
  • "Welcome Back"
  • "The Exterminator"
  • "Rachel Carson: Sounding the Alarm on Pollution"
    • Tracing the Argument" graphic organizers for the John Stossel video, as well as for "Double Whammy" and "Public Fear"  (both from "The Exterminator")
    • Sidebar task cards for "Seriously Sick" from "The Exterminator"
    • Sidebar task cards for "Killer Genes" from "The Exterminator"
    • Distribute two charts to each student: Benefits of DDT Cascading Consequences chart and the Harmful Consequences of DDT Cascading Consequences chart.
    • Explain that students should sort the articles, graphic organizers, and sidebar task cards so that some will go with the "Benefits of DDT" and others will go with the "Harmful Consequences of DDT." Each Cascading Consequence chart lists the appropriate documents.
    • Tell students that the video "DDT--dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane" (which they watched as part of the mid-unit 1 assessment) has information that can be added to the Harmful Consequences of DDT Cascading Consequences chart.
    • Ask students to add to their chart as you model how to create a Cascading Consequences chart.
    • Use a document camera or a board to model how to add information to the Harmful Consequences of DDT Cascading Consequences chart.
    • Tell students you will use the video, "DDT--dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane," that the students watched and used in the mid-unit assessment to identify claims and evidence. Begin to show the video: http://www.science.gc.ca/default.asp?lang=en&n=730d78b4-1
    • Pause the video at the end of a claim supported by evidence. (For example, the speaker expresses a claim that DDT is "harmful to all kinds of creatures"). Then he adds evidence such as: "Birds at the top of the food chain are harmed the most," "DDT makes their eggshells thinner," and "no young are produced."
  • Tell students to watch carefully as you continue the video. Pause after another claim and evidence. Ask students what claim and evidence they noticed. For example, the speaker explains (or "claims") that "DDT stays in the environment for a long time."
  • Demonstrate how to add this cascading information to the Cascading Consequences chart. Tell students to add a claim to their chart as you model. Draw an arrow from the "Harmful Consequences of DDT" square and add this to a new square. Then draw an arrow from this new square to add evidence such as "stays in water for 150 years" and it "builds up in the tissue of animals," and this is "called "bio-accumulation or bio-magnification." Demonstrate how to add arrows from the claim to the evidence and from that evidence to the next evidence that supports that claim.
  • Invite students to work in their triads to find and add additional information to the "Harmful Consequences of DDT" chart.
  • Explain that they will use other resources, the "Welcome Back" and "Rachel Carson: Sounding the Alarm on Pollution" articles, to look for additional information. Tell students that they should have at least three claims that support the position that using DDT has harmful consequences. Explain that they should have at least two pieces of evidence that cascades from or supports each claim. Allow students about 5 minutes to develop the Harmful Consequences of DDT Cascading Consequences chart.
  • Ask students to switch to the Benefits of DDT Cascading Consequences chart. Ask them to locate the articles, graphic organizers, and task cards that are listed on that chart. Explain that they will use those resources to look for and add claims and evidence that supports the use of DDT. Tell students that information should be placed on the diagram in a way that shows cascading information, or claims and evidence that happens in stages to cause an outcome.
  • Instruct students to include at least three different claims with at least two pieces of evidence to support each claim.
  • Remind students to label each square with the resources the information came from. This documentation will be important for the Fishbowl discussion that will take place as their end of unit 1 assessment.
  • Circulate and support students as they look for claims and evidence that supports the use of DDT. Watch for students to see if they are using circles, squares, and arrows that indicate a series or stages of related evidence that cascades toward an outcome or consequence. Look for patterns or diagrams that may need to be clarified.
  • Ask students to stop their work on the Cascading Consequences chart. Explain that they will now use the information they have diagrammed on their charts to discuss the benefits and harmful consequences of DDT.

B. Fishbowl Discussion: Cascading Consequences Chart about DDT (10 minutes)

  • Tell students that in a moment, each triad will partner with another triad in order to have a brief Fishbowl discussion. Ask them to be sure to bring all of their materials with them: their Benefits of DDT Cascading Consequence chart plus the resources they used to develop that, as well as the Harmful Consequences of DDT Cascading Consequences chart and the resources they use to develop that.
  • Invite each triad to join another triad. Ask one triad to begin as "1's" in the inner circle; the other triad will be "2's" in the outer circle. Explain that students in the inner circle and students in the outer circle have important roles.
  • Distribute the Fishbowl Assessment (from Lesson 9.) Invite students to look at the checklist. Explain that the students starting in the inner circle will discuss a question. They will use specific claims and evidence from their Cascading Consequences chart and they will refer to the resources in their discussion. The outer circle will listen, observe, and give feedback to their partners. The checklist will help students in both the inner and outer circle develop skills for good discussions with shared evidence.
  • Explain that everyone will participate in both the inner and outer circle. The "1's" who are starting in the inner circle will discuss the benefits of DDT. Later, the "2's" will be in the inner circle to discuss the harmful consequences of DDT. Each group will use their Cascading Consequences chart and the other resources. The goal or purpose of the discussion is to learn how to participate in a Fishbowl discussion and to increase their understanding about DDT and its benefits and consequences.
  • Explain that each group will have 3 minutes to discuss and 1 minute to receive feedback from their outer circle partner. The outer circle partner will help the inner circle partner set two goals to work on. Tell students that the first guided question is: "What are the benefits of DDT?"
  • Direct students to change places so the outer circle students will become the inner circle. Tell students the next guided question is: "What are harmful consequences caused by using DDT?" Invite the inner circle students to begin their discussion while the outer circle students will listen and record feedback for their partners on Fishbowl feedback sheets.
  • Circulate and observe as Fishbowl groups discuss. Watch for strengths and areas to work on.
  • Compliment students on their successes. Offer suggestions for goals to work on.
  • Invite students to organize their Cascading Consequences charts and resources into the benefits group and the harmful consequences group. Explain that they will be using new resources to add more information to the Cascading Consequences charts in the next lesson.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Exit Ticket (5 minutes)

  • Distribute the Exit Ticket: Fishbowl Successes and Fishbowl Goals. Ask students to write two things they did well and two things they would like to become stronger at in their discussion.
  • Collect students' exit tickets to help you gauge which students might need more support during future discussions.

Homework

Homework
  • Read Chapter 10: "There Are Eggs and Trouble." Complete Learning from Frightful's Perspective: Chapter 10.

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