Launching Frightful’s Mountain: Building Background Knowledge and Establishing Reading Routines | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M4:U1:L1

Launching Frightful’s Mountain: Building Background Knowledge and Establishing Reading Routines

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite text-based evidence to support an analysis of literary text. (RL.6.1)

Supporting Targets

  • I can identify the relationships of the main character at the beginning of the novel Frightful's Mountain.
  • I can use context clues to determine the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary in Frightful's Mountain.
  • I can use details from the text, Frightful's Mountain, to answer text-dependent questions.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Learning from Frightful's  Perspective: Chapter 1
  • Notice and Wonder: Response to Frightful's  Mountain by Jean Craighead George Video

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

     A.  Opening Quote: Human Needs and the Natural World (5 minutes)

     B.  Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2.  Work Time

     A.  Launching the Novel: Read-aloud of Chapter 1 of Frightful's Mountain (20 minutes)

     B.  Notice and Wonders: "Frightful's Mountain by Jean Craighead George"  Video (8 minutes)

     C.  Introducing Routines for Reading the Novel: Learning from Frightful's Perspective (5 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

     A.  Exit Ticket:  (5 minutes)

4.  Homework

     A.  Read Chapter 2, "Frightful Goes to Falcon School." Complete the Learning from Frightful's Perspective Chapter 2.

  • This first lesson is designed to engage students in the novel Frightful's Mountain and the broader issue of human needs and the natural world. and provide feedback.
  • This text is one of the resources students use to explore and evaluate the balance of human needs and the natural world. 
  • More specifically, throughout this module students will continually revisit the idea of the co-existence of people with the natural world, and how human needs affect the environment.
  • In Opening Part A, students consider the meaning of the quote "In nature nothing exists alone." This quote stimulates their thinking about the module's focus.
  • The lesson uses simple routines, or "protocols," throughout the module to promote student engagement. Review the Think-Pair-Share and Notice and Wonder protocols (Appendix).
  • Note that time is spent deconstructing the learning targets with students at the beginning of this lesson. This gives them a clear vision of each lesson's focus. This research-based strategy supports struggling learners most. Using learning targets is also a powerful way to teach academic vocabulary.
  • This lesson introduces close reading practices that will be built on throughout this module. These include reading for the gist, recognizing unfamiliar vocabulary, and finding evidence in text. Students likely are familiar with many of these routines from previous modules; adjust pacing as needed.
  • During read-alouds, students should be looking at the text and actively reading in their heads. The teacher reads aloud slowly, fluently, and without interruption or explanation. This read-aloud process promotes fluency for students, who are hearing a strong reader read the text aloud with accuracy and expression, and are simultaneously looking at and thinking about the words on the printed page.
  • In advance :

Preview the video (see link in supporting materials).

  • Look closely at the cover of Frightful's Mountain and the map; read Chapter 1, "Frightful Takes Off."
  • Prepare technology for showing video and modeling the Learning from Frightful's Perspective.
  • Prepare to display Rachel Carson's quote using the document camera or on chart paper.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

evidence; migrate, migration, instinct (video); sequel (cover), illustrated (title page); talons (5), perch (6), prey (7), jesses (9), culvert (11), predators (12), tiercel (19)

Materials

  • Document camera
  • Rachel Carson's quote (one for display)
  • Frightful's Mountain (book; one per student)
  • Performance Task Prompt
  • "Frightful's Mountain by Jean Craighead George" video from YouTube
  • Learning from Frightful's Perspective: Chapter 1 (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Opening Quote: Human Needs and the Natural World (5 minutes)

  • Using a document camera or chart paper, post Rachel Carson's quote where all students can see it. (See supporting materials.)
  • Do not explain the quote. Simply review that the quotation marks identify the exact words that had been spoken or written by someone else.
  • Verbally review the Think-Pair-Share protocol with students: 

1.  First, take a minute to think about the question or prompt.

Invite students to read the quote and think about it for 1 minute:

* "What do you think this quote means?"

2.  Pair up with someone next to you, a "next-door neighbor," not someone "around the block" from you, and take turns sharing your thinking about the question or prompt.

  • After 1 minute of partner conversation, focus students whole group. Ask:

* "What do you think this quote means?"

3.  Share with the whole class any thoughts you had, conclusions you came to, questions you still have, etc.

  • Encourage students to be specific and to use examples of relationships in nature that they shared with one another.
  • Probe with questions such as the following:

* "What are some relationships in nature?"

* "Can you think of any living thing that can exist without a relationship(s) with other things?"

* "Are all relationships beneficial?"

* "Based on this quote, what do think we will be studying in the weeks to come?"

  • Tell students that today they begin a new and important study about the challenges of finding a balance between human needs and the natural world.
  • Introduce students to the word interdependence. Post it where all students can see. Ask:

* "What words or word parts do you see inside this larger word that might help us understand its meaning?"

  • Invite volunteer responses. Listen for: "inter" and "depend." If students do not know, tell them that inter is a prefix that means "between" or "among" and depend is a verb that means "to rely on" or "to control." Ask:

* "Given those meanings, what do you think interdependence means?"

  • Guide students toward the idea that interdependence means "a relationship between two things in which both parties  need or are affected by the other."
  • Tell students that they will be thinking a lot about the interdependence between people and the natural word throughout this module. 
  • Communicate with ELL and SPED staff to prepare for this module.
  • An audio version of Frightful's Mountain is available. Check with the school library or local library for availability.
  • Provide nonlinguistic symbols to help students make connections with vocabulary. These symbols can be used throughout the module in directions and learning targets.
  • Select students may find it helpful to determine the gist of smaller chunks of the text at a time.
  • Some students may need more frequent checks for understanding and guided practice.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the learning targets for today's lesson. Remind students that learning targets are helpful tools in understanding their own learning goals.
  • Read aloud as students read along:

"I can identify the relationships of the main character at the beginning of the novel Frightful's Mountain."

"I can use context clues to determine the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary in Frightful's Mountain."

Work Time

Work Time

A.Launching the Novel: Read-aloud of Chapter 1 of Frightful's Mountain (20 minutes)

  • Distribute the novel, Frightful's Mountain, to each student. Invite students to look at the cover and the author's name. Explain that the author is also the illustrator, the artist who drew the cover and the pictures in the book. Draw attention to the two other novels listed below the title. Explain that the main characters and the setting were first introduced in those books. Tell the class that Frightful's Mountain is a sequel, a book that follows the others and continues the story.
  • Invite students to open their books to the map on the second page (opposite the title page). Ask students what state this novel takes place in and invite them to find other places they may be familiar with or places that are close to where they live.
  • Direct students' attention to the smaller map and the dotted line. Ask what that line might represent.
  • Before reading aloud, briefly review "getting the gist": reading through quickly to get an initial sense of what the text is mostly about.
  • Tell students that you will read Chapter 1, "Frightful Takes Off," aloud. Tell them that, as usual, they should follow along and read in their heads as you read aloud. Set a purpose for students: as you read, they should notice Frightful's relationships.
  • Read Chapter 1 slowly, fluently, and without interruption.
  • Invite students to think, then talk with a partner:

* "What was this chapter mostly about?"

* "What relationships did you notice Frightful has?"

B. Notice and Wonders: "Frightful's Mountain by Jean Craighead George" Video (8 minutes)

  • Tell students that this video introduces them to a bird of prey, the peregrine falcon, whose survival has been threatened due to changing relationships in its environment, such as the falcon's relationship with humans. The video further introduces Frightful, a peregrine falcon, who is the main character of the novel they are reading.
  • Explain that they are watching the video to help get the gist of the novel. Ask students to label a sheet of paper with two headings. Model if needed. Title the left-hand column with the word "Notice" and the right-hand column with the word "Wonder."
  • Tell students to write their notices and wonders on the labeled paper as they watch the video.
  • Play the "Frightful's Mountain by Jean Craighead George" video from YouTube (3:08 minutes). http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8B7ZVxXYVRE
  • Invite class members to share:

* "What did you notice? What did you wonder?" 

  • Tell students they will continue to learn more about Frightful and peregrine falcons as they read the novel and other texts.

C. Introducing Routines for Reading the Novel: Learning from Frightful's Perspective (5 minutes)

  • Distribute the Learning from Frightful's Perspective: Chapter 1. Tell students that they will use this to help answer a focusing question for each chapter and to look for evidence, details that support ideas and opinions. Explain that the new vocabulary, focus questions, finding evidence, and recording their thoughts will help deepen their understanding of each chapter and the novel.
  • Use a document camera to display Learning from Frightful's Perspective: Chapter 1. Direct students' attention to the
  • Chapter 1 focus question.
  • Read through the question together and guide students through the layout of the document. Model the response to the question. Ask students to record the responses on their Learning from Frightful's Perspective.
  • Still using the document camera, direct students to the word-catcher part of Learning from Frightful's Perspective. Explain that some of the new vocabulary will appear in the glossary section with definitions. The other section, Words I Found Difficult, is where they will add unfamiliar words they find in each chapter.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Exit Ticket: Using the Word-catcher (5 minutes)

  • Ask a student to work with a partner to find definitions for the three words with page numbers from Chapter 1 (jesses, culvert, and tiercel). Tell students that each of these words can be defined using context clues in the sentences around the word.
  • Be sure that each student records his or her definition on the word-catcher part of Learning from Frightful's Perspective

Homework

Homework
  • Read Chapter 2, "Frightful Goes to Falcon School." Complete Learning from Frightful's Perspective: Chapter 2. Add at least three unfamiliar words and definitions to the Words I Found Difficult part of the graphic organizer.

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