Planning Content of Informative Consumer Guide: The Issue of Overfishing and Fish Depletion | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M3B:U3:L8

Planning Content of Informative Consumer Guide: The Issue of Overfishing and Fish Depletion

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can write informative/explanatory texts that convey ideas and concepts using relevant information that is carefully selected and organized. (W.6.2)
  • I can produce clear and coherent writing that is appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (W.6.4)
  • I can use evidence from a variety of grade-appropriate texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.6.9)

Supporting Targets

  • I can organize the information and quotes I have chosen about overfishing and the issue of fish depletion into a Quote Sandwich organizer.
  • I can evaluate research to choose the most relevant and compelling factual information and quotes for my informative consumer guide.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Structured notes: Chapter 10 of World without Fish (from homework)
  • Quote Sandwich for the issue of overfishing and fish depletion
  • Circled information and quotes on Researching graphic organizer from Lesson 3

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A.  Engaging the Reader: Chapter 10 of World without Fish (5 minutes)

B.  Unpacking Learning Targets (3 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A.  Modeling the Quote Sandwich (8 minutes)

B.  Working on a Quote Sandwich (12 minutes)

C.  Identifying Relevant and Compelling Factual Information and Quotes (10 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A.  Pair Share (7 minutes)

 4.  Homework

A.  Using the information and quotes you have circled about a depleted fish species on your Researching graphic organizer from Lesson 3, complete the Quote Sandwich graphic organizer to plan the paragraph for your informative consumer guide. Remember that you may not be able to use all of the information and quotes you have circled, in which case you may need to reevaluate which ones you use.

B.  Continue reading your independent reading book.

  • This lesson begins with students revisiting what they read in Chapter 10 for homework. As global warming can be a controversial issue, make it clear to students that this is Mark Kurlansky's opinion, but that other people may have different opinions about global warming.
  • Emphasize to students that they are continuing to read World without Fish for homework because while they are not discussing other issues that he discusses, like global warming, in their informative consumer guides, it is important to understand all of the ideas that Mark Kurlansky suggests in his book to have an idea of the bigger picture of fish depletion outside overfishing.
  • In this lesson, students use the Quote Sandwich organizer to arrange their chosen information and quotes about overfishing and fish depletion into a paragraph that could be used in their informative consumer guide. The process of filling in a Quote Sandwich organizer is modeled in this lesson with a paragraph from the model informative consumer guide. Students are then released to practice independently.
  • Students then evaluate the information and quotes gathered on their Researching graphic organizers from Lesson 3 about the depleted fish species (case study) in the same way they evaluated the information and quotes about overfishing in the previous lesson.
  • For homework, students organize their information and quotes about the depleted fish species (case study) onto a new Quote Sandwich graphic organizer. This will further prepare them to complete their informative consumer guide.
  • In advance:

-   Plan to return students' Mid-Unit 3 Assessments in Lesson 9, with your feedback. .

  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

evaluate

Materials

  • Model informative consumer guide (from Lesson 1)
  • Model Quote Sandwich Guide: Are You Buying Fruits and Vegetables Today? (one to display)
  • Quote Sandwich graphic organizers (two per student)
  • Researching graphic organizer: Lesson 2 (students' completed organizers)
  • Performance Task Prompt: Informative Consumer Guide (from Lesson 1; one per student)
  • Researching graphic organizers: Lesson 3 (students' completed organizers)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Chapter 10 of World without Fish (5 minutes)

  • Remind students of the homework: Read Chapter 10 of World without Fish and answer the focus questions: According to Mark Kurlansky, what is global warming doing to fish? How?
  • Invite students to take out their structured notes.
  • Ask students to pair up to share their answers on their structured notes and to make revisions where they think necessary.
  • Select volunteers to share their answers with the whole group. Listen for students to explain that Kurlansky thinks global warming could kill fish because some species of fish need cold ocean temperatures. Listen for students to also explain that he thinks global warming is melting the polar ice caps, which over time will cause the water to be less salty and could kill some species of fish.
  • Emphasize to students that they are continuing to read World without Fish for homework because while they are not discussing other issues that he discusses, like global warming, on their informative consumer guides, it is important for them to understand all of the ideas that Mark Kurlansky suggests in his book to have an idea of the bigger picture of fish depletion outside overfishing. Remind students that if they only read about overfishing, they only understand one of the three problems that he highlights.
  • Opening the lesson by asking students to share their homework makes them accountable for completing it. It also gives you the opportunity to monitor which students are not doing their homework.
  • Consider pairing ELL students who speak the same first language to deepen their discussion and understanding.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (3 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and read them aloud:

*   "I can organize the information and quotes I have chosen about overfishing and the issue of fish depletion into a Quote Sandwich organizer."

*   "I can evaluate research to choose the most relevant and compelling factual information and quotes for my informative consumer guide."

  • Remind students that they have used the Quote Sandwich organizers in Module 2 to organize their evidence.
  • Remind students also of what evaluate means.
  • Reviewing key academic vocabulary in learning targets can prepare students for vocabulary they may encounter in the lesson.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Modeling the Quote Sandwich (8 minutes)

  • Have students retrieve their copy of the model informative consumer guide from Lesson 1.
  • Invite them to reread the paragraph at the top of the model informative consumer guides aloud.
  • Display Model Quote Sandwich Guide: Are You Buying Fruits and Vegetables Today?
  • Point out the three parts of the Quote Sandwich.
  • Invite students to discuss with an elbow partner:

*   "How has the author used the Quote Sandwich to plan this paragraph?"

  • Select volunteers to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that each part of the Quote Sandwich is a part of the paragraph. In organizing the information and quotes on the Quote Sandwich, the author has planned the content of the paragraph.
  • Make sure students understand that while the quote is in the middle, there is also researched information to introduce the issue. Students should combine their researched information and quotes using the Quote Sandwich organizer.
  • Showing a model of a completed organizer that is connected to the model essay guides students in the expectations you have of them.

B. Working on a Quote Sandwich (12 minutes)

  • Distribute the Quote Sandwich graphic organizers.
  • Explain that students will do the same thing that you have modeled, independently using the evidence they have circled on their Researching graphic organizer: Lesson 2.
  • Explain to students that they may not be able to use all of the information and quotes they have circled, in which case they may need to reevaluate and choose new ones.
  • They may discuss ideas with an elbow partner, but this work is to be their own. Invite students to begin working.
  • Circulate to support students in filling in their organizers. Ask guiding questions:

*   "How can you introduce the issue? What information do you have from research that would introduce the issue well?"

*   "How can you include the quotes you have selected?"

*   "How can you explain the quotes you have selected? Do you have any other information that you can use to explain the quotes you have selected?"

  • Consider seating students who may need additional support in one area to work with them as a group.

C. Identifying Relevant and Compelling Factual Information and Quotes (10 minutes)

  • Ask students to take out their copy of the Performance Task Prompt: Informative Consumer Guide and reread it, focusing particularly on the second bullet: "Your informative consumer guide needs to include relevant and compelling factual information and quotes about: A case study of a fish species that has severely depleted and the impact of the depletion of that species on the food chain."
  • Remind students that their informative consumer guide needs to be no longer than one piece of letter-sized paper containing all of the information listed in the bullet points, so they need to select the information that is most relevant and compelling while providing all of the information the consumers will need to buy fish caught using more sustainable fishing methods.
  • Explain that for the rest of this lesson, students will evaluate their information and quotes about a depleted fish species from Lesson 3 to choose what to use in their informative consumer guide.
  • Remind students they did this in the previous lesson for the information and quotes they had researched about overfishing and fish depletion.
  • Invite students to take out their Researching graphic organizer: Lesson 3.
  • Invite students to work together in pairs to evaluate all of the factual information and quotes in their Researching graphic organizers to identify the most relevant and compelling of those on the issue of overfishing and fish depletion.
  • Circulate to assist students. Ask guiding questions:

*   "Why have you put a star next to this?"

*   "Why do people need to know this information?"

*   "Which of these pieces of information/quotes about the depleted fish species is most relevant and compelling? Or do you need to use them both?"

  • "Does the quote support a particular piece of information? Or does it provide relevant information in a compelling way itself?"
  • Modeling the activity for students can provide them with the expectations you have of their independent work. It can also provide students with the confidence to work independently, giving you time to support students who require additional support.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Pair Share (7 minutes)

  • Invite students to get into new pairs to share the information and quotes they have circled and to justify why they have circled them.
  • Encourage students to help each other to ensure they have only selected the most relevant and compelling information and quotes. Remind students that they will only have one piece of letter-sized paper, and they need to include other information, like the case study, sustainable fishing methods, and suggestions for buying fish caught using sustainable methods, as well.
  • Distribute a new Quote Sandwich graphic organizer to each student.

Homework

Homework
  • Using the information and quotes you have circled about a depleted fish species on your Researching graphic organizer from Lesson 3, complete the Quote Sandwich graphic organizer to plan the paragraph for your informative consumer guide. Remember that you may not be able to use all of the information and quotes you have circled, in which case you may need to reevaluate which ones you use.
  • Continue reading your independent reading book.

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