Mid-Unit 3 Assessment Part 2: Explaining How New Information Connects to the Topic | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M3B:U3:L6

Mid-Unit 3 Assessment Part 2: Explaining How New Information Connects to the Topic

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can interpret information presented in different media and formats. (SL.6.2)      
  • I can explain how new information connects to a topic, text, or issue I am studying. (SL.6.2)

Supporting Targets

  • I can explain how the new information I found through research deepens my understanding of what consumers need to know about overfishing and fish depletion when buying fish.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Structured notes
  • Mid-Unit 3 Assessment, Part 2: Explaining How New Information Connects to the Topic (oral)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A.  Unpacking the Learning Target (2 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A.  Mid-Unit 3 Assessment, Part 2: Explaining How New Information Connects to a Topic (40 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A.  Debrief (3 minutes)

4.  Homework

A.  Read to the end of Chapter 9 of World without Fish. Remember to record new words on your word-catcher. As you read, mark the text with evidence flags to help you continue to answer the focus question on your structured notes:

  • According to Mark Kurlansky, what is pollution doing to fish? How?

B.  Continue to read your independent reading book.

  • In this lesson, students complete Part 2 of the Mid-Unit 3 Assessment. For this part of the assessment, students explain orally in a triad discussion how the resources they analyzed in Part 1 of the assessment deepen their understanding of what consumers need to know about sustainable fishing when buying fish. You will observe, in order to assess SL.6.2.
  • Depending on the size of your class, you may need to spend more than the allocated time on this assessment.
  • Work Time A includes discussion questions that enable you to score students' achievement of SL.6.2. Assess students' responses using the Mid-Unit 3 Assessment: Part 2 Rubric provided in the supporting materials.
  • In advance:

-   Prepare and post a discussion schedule so students can see when they will take part in the discussion with you. When they are not participating in their discussion, they should focus on independent reading or an independent reading assessment that you prepare.

-   This may be a good time to assess the independent reading standards RL.6.11a and RL.6.11b. See the stand-alone document on EngageNY.org: Launching Independent Reading in Grades 6-8: Sample Plan

  • Post: Learning target.

Materials

  • Discussion schedule (new; teacher-created; one to display)
  • Mid-Unit 3 Assessment, Part 1 (from Lesson 5; students' completed copies)
  • Assessment research folders (from Lesson 5; one per student)
  • Mid-Unit 3 Assessment, Part 2: Explaining How New Information Connects to the Topic Rubric (one per student)
  • Evidence flags (three per student for homework)
  • Structured notes (from Unit 2, Lesson 1; one new blank copy per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A.  Unpacking the Learning Target (2 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning target and ask for a volunteer to read it aloud:

*   "I can explain how the new information I found through research deepens my understanding of what consumers need to know about sustainable fishing when buying fish."

  • Explain to students that in this lesson they are going to be finishing their Mid-Unit 3 Assessment by having a discussion with you.
  • Point to the posted discussion schedule.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A.  Mid-Unit 3 Assessment, Part 2: Explaining How New Information Connects to the Topic (40 minutes)

  • Set students on independent reading and/or an independent reading assessment (see Teaching Notes).
  • Invite students to get into triads.
  • Invite the first triad to take out their Mid-Unit 3 Assessment: Part 1 and assessment research folders from the previous lesson and move to meet with you.
  • Ask this triad to discuss:

*   "What do you now know about sustainable fishing when buying fish that you didn't know before you saw those resources?"

*   "What factual information did you find out? Which resource did it come from? How did it answer the question?"

*   "What compelling quotes did you find? Which resource did it come from? How did they deepen your understanding?"

  • Ensure all students contribute. If students do not contribute, cold call on them to do so.
  • Assess each student using the Mid-Unit 3 Assessment: Part 2 Rubric.
  • If students receive accommodations for assessments, communicate with the cooperating service providers regarding the practices of instruction in use during this study as well as the goals of the assessment.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A.  Debrief (3 minutes)

  • Refocus students whole group.
  • Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "Now that you have done all of your research, what do you think your next steps should be in creating your informative consumer guide?"

  • Select volunteers to share their responses.
  • Guide students to understand that now they need to evaluate their factual information and quotes to determine which ones they will use in their informative consumer guides.
  • Preview homework and distribute structured notes and evidence flags.
  • The debrief after the assessment can help build a culture of achievement in your classroom.

Homework

Homework
  • Read to the end of Chapter 9 of World without Fish. Remember to record new words on your word-catcher. As you read, mark the text with evidence flags to help you continue to answer the focus question on your structured notes:

-   According to Mark Kurlansky, what is pollution doing to fish? How?

  • Continue to read your independent reading book.

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