Researching Information About Overfishing | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M3B:U3:L2

Researching Information About Overfishing

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can write informative/explanatory texts that convey ideas and concepts using relevant information that is carefully selected and organized. (W.6.2)
  • I can conduct short research projects to answer a question. (W.6.7)
  • I can interpret information presented in different media and formats. (SL.6.2)

Supporting Targets

  • I can research overfishing to find relevant and compelling factual information and quotes.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Structured notes: First part of Chapter 7 of World without Fish (from homework)
  • Researching graphic organizer: Lesson 2

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A.  Engaging the Reader: Chapter 7 of World without Fish (5 minutes)

B.  Unpacking the Learning Target (3 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A.  Modeling how to Fill In the Researching Graphic Organizer for a Video (15 minutes)

B.  Researching Facts: Part 1 of the Jigsaw (15 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A.  Triad Share: Part 2 of the Jigsaw (7 minutes)

4.  Homework

A.  Read the rest of Chapter 7 of World without Fish. Remember to record new words on your word-catcher. Use evidence flags to gather evidence as you read to answer the focus question on your structured notes:

  • According to Mark Kurlansky, what are some other solutions to the issue of fish depletion? According to Kurlansky, why won't they work?

B.  Continue reading your independent reading book.

  • In this lesson, students work in triads to research information about overfishing. This is done in a Jigsaw, so each triad is given a different research resource and they partner up with another triad in the Closing and Assessment to share their findings.
  • To practice SL.6.2, students are given Researching graphic organizers and also watch an excerpt of a video called "Ending Overfishing" (accessed here: http://www.ocean2012.eu/pages/94-ending-overfishing-animation) as part of their research. How you choose to manage this depends on the technology you have available. You may choose to show it to the whole group, or have it set up on devices for students to access independently. As with other research resources, it needs to be reviewed multiple times to be used effectively. Please note and explain to students that this video was made by and for Europeans, so many of the measurements they use, like meters and kilos, may not be familiar to them. There is a transcription of the video included in the supporting materials that you can read to your class if you do not have access to audiovisual equipment.
  • As in Unit 1, continue to emphasize to students that the ideas presented are just one point of view and that there are other points of view out there on overfishing and fish depletion.
  • In advance:

-   Prepare the research articles for each triad (see supporting materials). Each triad needs to be allocated one research article, and you need enough of each article for one per student. The articles provided range in difficulty--determine how to allocate articles by considering the reading level of students in each triad. Each triad needs to be given a glossary for its vocabulary article, too. An excerpt of World without Fish is also used as a research resource, so consider allocating this to triads with students who require more support with reading, as they should already be familiar with the text.

-   Review: Concentric Circles protocol (see Appendix).

  • Post: Learning target.

Vocabulary

factual information, relevant, compelling; see glossaries for vocabulary words pertaining to specific research resources

Materials

  • Performance Task Prompt: Informative Consumer Guide (from Lesson 1; one per student)
  • Researching graphic organizer: Lesson 2 (one per student and one for display)
  • "Ending Overfishing" video (up to 2:40)
  • Ending Overfishing" Video Transcript (for teacher reference)

-   Research articles and glossaries (one per student in assigned triad; see Teaching Notes):

-   World without Fish: pages 36 and 37  (book; distributed in Unit 1; one per student)

-   "Threat 1: Overfishing"

-   "Destructive Fishing"

-   "Protecting Ocean Habitat from Bottom Trawling"

  • Evidence flags (three per student for homework)
  • Structured notes (from Unit 2, Lesson 1; one new blank copy per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Chapter 7 of World without Fish (5 minutes)

  • Remind students of the homework: Read up to page 97 in Chapter 7 of World without Fish and answer the focus question on their structured notes: According to Mark Kurlansky, what are some solutions to the issue of fish depletion? According to Kurlansky, why won't they work?
  • Ask students to take out their structured notes and review them.
  • Invite students to follow the Concentric Circles protocol to share their structured notes:
  1. Split the group in half. Invite one half to get into a circle with their structured notes and the other half to make a circle around them also with their structured notes.
  2. Ask the inner circle to face out and the outer circle to face in. Each student should be facing another.
  3. Invite the inner circle to share their answer(s) to the homework focus question with the person opposite them.
  4. Invite the outer circle to do the same.
  5. Invite the inner circle to move two people to the left.
  6. Repeat three to five times until each student has spoken to three people.
  • Ask students to return to their seats.
  • Invite students to make revisions to their structured notes where necessary based on their discussions during the Concentric Circles protocol.
  • Select volunteers to share their answers to the focus question with the whole group. Listen for students to explain that fish farming is one solution, but it won't work because farmed fish are fed wild fish that have been caught at sea. Another solution is limiting the number of fish that fishermen can catch, but this is hard to manage and encourages fishermen, when they have caught more fish than they are allowed, to just throw back the dead fish into the water. The fish have been caught and killed either way.
  • Opening the lesson by asking students to share their homework makes them accountable for completing it. It also gives you the opportunity to monitor which students are not doing their homework.
  • Consider pairing ELL students who speak the same first language to deepen their discussion and understanding.

B. Unpacking the Learning Target (3 minutes)

  • Announce triads. Ask students to quietly move to sit with their triads.
  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning target and ask for a volunteer to read it aloud:

*   "I can research overfishing to find relevant and compelling factual information and quotes."

  • Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "What is factual information? Why are you looking for factual information?"

*   "What does relevant mean?"

*   "What does compelling mean?"

  • Cold call students to share out their ideas whole group. Listen for students to explain that factual information is information that is undeniably true and that they are researching factual information because this brochure is informative --they are aiming to inform the consumer with factual information rather than to try to persuade them with opinions. Listen for students to explain that relevant means that it is appropriate to the topic, and compelling means it sparks the interest of the reader and makes them want to continue reading to the end. We want readers to read to the end of the consumer guides to be fully informed of the issue.
  • Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "Where have you already read some information about overfishing?"

  • Select volunteers to share their ideas. Listen for students to explain that World without Fish contains information about overfishing.
  • Explain to students that today some of them will be revisiting an excerpt of this text in their research.
  • Remind students that as in Unit 1 with Mark Kurlansky's World without Fish, there are different points of view about overfishing and fish depletion, so they should not accept everything they read as fact. Make it clear that good readers question everything--they don't believe everything that they read, but instead they consider ideas they read and use them as a jumping point to find out more.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Modeling How to Fill In the Researching Graphic Organizer for a Video (15 minutes)

  • Display the Performance Task Prompt: Informative Consumer Guide and invite students to refer to their own copies.
  • Focus students on the first bullet: "Include compelling information and quotes about the issue: overfishing and how it causes fish depletion."
  • Ask students to discuss with their triads:

*   "How are you going to find out more about the issue of overfishing and fish depletion? What does the learning target say?"

*   "We read about overfishing and fish depletion in World without Fish, so why are we not just going to the information from that book?"

  • Select students to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that they are going to find out more by researching, as the learning target suggests, and they are not just going to use the information in World without Fish. To ensure they are including the most accurate information, they should read other resources to check that the information in World without Fish is accurate.
  • Display and distribute the Researching graphic organizer: Lesson 2. Focus students on the line for a "'Refined research question" at the top of the page.
  • Tell students to discuss in triads:

*   "You will be researching to find more information about overfishing and fish depletion in this lesson. What do you think a refined research question might be for this lesson? Why?"

  • Select volunteers to share their ideas with the class. Listen for students to suggest a question like: "What is overfishing and how does it contribute to the issue of fish depletion?"
  • Invite students to record a refined research question on the lines of their graphic organizer.
  • Invite students to read through the directions and the column headings on the Researching graphic organizer with you.
  • Tell students that they are going to be researching informative facts about the issue of overfishing that they could use in their informative consumer guides.
  • Explain that they will begin by watching a video about overfishing. Tell students you are going to play the video and you would like them to just watch it through the first time without recording anything on their graphic organizer to see all of the content. You will give them time at the end of the video to make notes on their organizers and you will also replay the video. Emphasize that this video was made by Europeans for Europeans, so many of the measurements they hear, like kilos and meters, may not be familiar to them, but they should still be able to understand the main points the video is making.
  • Play the "Ending Overfishing" video (http://www.ocean2012.eu/pages/94-ending-overfishing-animation) up to 2:40 for the class without stopping it.
  • Invite students to talk with an elbow partner about the compelling and relevant factual information and quotes they saw on the video.
  • Select students to share their ideas with the whole group.
  • Model filling in the displayed Researching graphic organizer with the title and source ("Ending Overfishing" Ocean 2012) and student ideas.
  • Tell students that you are going to replay the video, and this time they can make notes on their Researching graphic organizers as they watch.
  • Replay the video.
  • Invite students to talk with an elbow partner about the compelling and relevant factual information and quotes they saw on the video and recorded on their graphic organizer.
  • Select students to share their ideas with the whole group.
  • Continue to model filling in the displayed Researching graphic organizer with students' ideas.
  • Consider pairing up ELL students who speak the same first language to encourage deeper discussion about the video.
  • Modeling how to fill in the Researching graphic organizer will ensure all students know what is expected of them when they begin working independently; it will also provide them with the confidence necessary to begin working on their own.

B. Researching Facts: Part 1 of the Jigsaw (15 minutes)

  • Tell students they are going to do a Jigsaw so each triad will have a different article to use for research. Then, they will come together at the end to share what they have found; this way, they can share the workload of researching facts.
  • Distribute the research articles and glossaries.
  • Choose a team to model following the directions and filling in the displayed Researching graphic organizer with just the first couple of paragraphs of their article.
  • Remind students to discuss their ideas before writing anything on their individual graphic organizers.
  • Invite triads to begin.
  • Circulate to support students in reading the texts and underlining factual information. Ask probing questions as necessary:

*   "Does this information answer your refined focus question?"

*   "Is this relevant factual information? Is it something that is undeniably true?"

*   "What makes this information/quote compelling?"

  • If students have been grouped homogeneously, focus your attention on those triads that need additional support reading the research materials.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Triad Share: Part 2 of the Jigsaw (7 minutes)

  • Invite triads to pair up with another triad to share the factual information they collected on the issue of overfishing.
  • Invite triads to add any new pieces of factual information to their graphic organizer.
  • Preview homework and distribute structured notes and evidence flags.
  • Inviting triads to share their work can function as a self-check and enables triads to push each other's thinking further.

Homework

Homework
  • Read the rest of Chapter 7 of World without Fish. Remember to record new words on your word-catcher. Use evidence flags to gather evidence as you read to answer the focus question on your structured notes:

-   According to Mark Kurlansky, what are some other solutions to the issue of fish depletion? According to Kurlansky, why won't they work?

  • Continue reading your independent reading book.

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