Revising the Informative Consumer Guide: Sentence Structure, Transitions, and Works Cited | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M3B:U3:L12

Revising the Informative Consumer Guide: Sentence Structure, Transitions, and Works Cited

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can use a variety of sentence structures to make my writing and speaking more interesting. (L.6.3a)
  • I can maintain consistency in style and tone when writing and speaking. (L.6.3b)

Supporting Targets

  • I can use a variety of sentence structures to make my informative consumer guide more interesting.
  • I can use appropriate transitions to make the informative consumer guide flow smoothly.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Revised Draft of Written Content of Informative Consumer Guide
  • Self-assessment on Row 3 of the New York State Grades 6-8 Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A.  Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A.  Mini Lesson: Sentence Structure (16 minutes)

B.  Mini Lesson: Transitions (7 minutes)

C.  Writing a Works Cited List (12 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A.  Self-Assessment against the Rubric (8 minutes)

4.  Homework

A.  Continue reading your independent reading book.

  • Students need the End of Unit 3 Assessment: Draft of Written Content of Informative Consumer Guides returned in this lesson for revision; however, they don't need to receive teacher feedback until the next lesson.
  • To address Language Standards L.6.3a and L.6.3b, students have mini lessons on sentence structure and appropriate transitions to improve the flow of their informative consumer guides. Students then revise their guide drafts with this new knowledge in mind.
  • In the next lesson, students will create their final informative consumer guides for the performance task. If you require more time to provide feedback on the End of Unit 3 Assessment, consider adding lessons in which students read independently and/or complete the independent reading assessment. See the independent reading document, "Launching Independent Reading in Grades 6-8: Sample Plan," on EngageNY.org
  • Post: Learning targets.

Materials

  • Sentence Structure and Transitions (one per student and one to display)
  • End of Unit 3 Assessment: Draft of Written Content of Informative Consumer Guide (from Lesson 10; without teacher feedback; one per student)
  • New York State Grades 6-8 Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric (from Lesson 1; one to display)
  • Model informative consumer guide (from Lesson 1; one per student)
  • Researching graphic organizers (from Lessons 2-4 students' completed copies)
  • Mid-Unit 3 Assessment Part 1: Researching Information about Buying Fish Caught Using Sustainable Methods (from Lesson 5; students' completed copies)
  • Row 3 of the New York State Grades 6-8 Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric: Self-Assessment (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Invite students to sit in their triads.
  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and read them aloud:

*    "I can use a variety of sentence structures to make my informative consumer guide more interesting."

*   "I can use appropriate transitions to make the informative consumer guide flow smoothly."

  • Invite students to Think-Pair-Share:

*   "What are appropriate transitions? Why are they important?"

  • Select volunteers to share their ideas. Listen for students to explain that appropriate transitions are the words and phrases used to connect sentences and paragraphs, and they are important because they help writing flow well.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Mini Lesson: Sentence Structure (16 minutes)

  • Display the Sentence Structure handout with only the top of the handout showing to students--the boxes with the A and B examples of sentences.
  • Direct students to determine which one is more interesting: A or B, and why.
  • Read each box aloud.
  • Ask for a volunteer to share which one was more interesting and why. Listen for the student to explain something like: "B flowed more easily, was not as choppy, and had some variety to the sentence structure."
  • Distribute the Sentence Structure handout to each student.
  • Read the asterisked notes under the A and B boxes. Tell students to do Number 2 on the handout.
  • Ask them to read their sentence aloud to their triad and make any changes if it didn't flow well when they read it aloud.
  • Circulate and support students as needed. You might have a student say a new sentence aloud first if he or she is stuck writing one down.
  • Refocus whole class. Cold call on one or two triads to whom you were not able to circulate to extend your check for understanding.
  • Write down their sentences on the displayed Sentence Structure handout.
  • Think aloud about how the students combined the sentences while keeping the language and style. An example of a new sentence might be: "Bottom dragging destroys a lot of life on the seabed and it also results in a lot of by-catch."
  • Hand back students' End of Unit 3 Assessment: Draft of Written Content of Informative Consumer Guide. Give directions:
  1. Choose one paragraph to revise for more interesting sentence structure.
  2. Review the sentences in that paragraph and combine them if needed, writing the new sentences in the margins of your draft.
  3. Read your whole paragraph aloud and determine if the sentences flow together well. If not, revise the sentences that seemed choppy.
  • Circulate and support students with their sentence combining and revision.
  • Consider supporting some students by helping them make a next-steps list at the top of their draft. This helps students chunk the task for revision into smaller steps.

B. Mini Lesson: Transitions (7 minutes)

  • Display the New York State Grades 6-8 Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric.
  • Circle Row 3 and read aloud to students: "Exhibit clear organization with the use of appropriate and varied transitions to create a unified whole."
  • Ask them to discuss in triads:

*   "What does 'transitions to create a unified whole' mean?"

  • Cold call on a student and listen for: "Transition words help connect one paragraph to the next."
  • Emphasize that because informative consumer guides present information in relatively small chunks, they use transitions a little differently than a literary analysis or a narrative. While there are still sometimes transitional words and phrases at the beginning of paragraphs, where there is a subheading dividing paragraphs, we know that the subheading provides the transition by signaling the start of a new topic or idea.
  • Ask students to take out their copies of the model informative consumer guide and reread it, paying particular attention to the transitions.
  • Invite students to discuss in triads.

*    "What do you notice about transitions?"

  • Select volunteers to share their responses. Listen for them to notice that there are a few transitions like "One of the suggested negative impacts on our health ..." and "Another study ..." but mostly the paragraphs are connected by content with subheadings to divide different topics.
  • Invite students to review and revise the transitions in their informative consumer guide drafts.

C. Writing a Works Cited List (12 minutes)

  • Remind students of the final bullet on the Performance Task Prompt: "Include a Works Cited List."
  • Invite students to refer to the Works Cited list at the bottom of the model informative consumer guide.
  • Ask students to look at the format of the Works Cited list:

-   Author's last name, author's first name and middle initial. "Name of text." Where the text was found and when it was published. When the text was found.

  • Invite students to revisit their Researching graphic organizers to write a Works Cited list for the evidence they have used in their informative consumer guide drafts.
  • Circulate to support students in writing their Works Cited list.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Self-Assessment against the Rubric (8 minutes)

  • Distribute Row 3 of the New York State Grades 6-8 Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric: Self-Assessment.
  • Invite students to read the Criteria column and Column 3 aloud with you for Row 3.
  • Tell students they are going to score their informative consumer guide drafts against the rubric. Ask them to underline on the rubric where their writing fits best. Then, they should justify how they have scored themselves using evidence from their draft writing on the lines underneath.
  • Remind students to be honest when self-assessing because identifying where there are problems with their work will help them improve their work in the next draft. Remind students that writing is a set of skills that have to be learned over time. Encourage them to give their best assessment.
  • Invite students to begin.
  • Circulate and encourage students to think carefully about their scoring choices. Consider prompting students with this question as needed:

*    "You have underlined this part of your rubric. Why? Where is the evidence in your essay to support this?"

  • Students who finish quickly can begin to revise their informative consumer guide draft based on their scoring against the rubric.
  • Congratulate students on their focus and effort at revision.
  • Collect the revised drafts and the self-assessments from students to continue providing feedback for the End of Unit 3 Assessment.
  • Self-assessment can enable students to recognize the issues in their own work, so giving them a sense of ownership and responsibility for correcting their mistakes.

Homework

Homework
  • Continue reading your independent reading book.

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