Analyzing the Features of an Informative Consumer Guide | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M3B:U3:L11

Analyzing the Features of an Informative Consumer Guide

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can write informative/explanatory texts that convey ideas and concepts using relevant information that is carefully selected and organized. (W.6.2)
  • I can integrate information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words to develop a coherent understanding of a topic or issue. (RI.6.7)

Supporting Targets

  • I can identify the features of an informative consumer guide.
  • I can select visuals like images, charts, and graphs to make my informative consumer guide eye-catching and to help consumers better understand the issue of overfishing and fish depletion.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Annotated informative consumer guides

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A.  Unpacking Learning Targets (3 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A.  Identifying the Features of an Informative Consumer Guide (15 minutes)

B.  Selecting Visuals for the Informative Consumer Guide (20 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A.  Pair Share (7 minutes)

4.  Homework

A.  Look at the layout of the model and consider the layout of the informative consumer guides you have studied today. Sketch out on your blank paper where you are going to record each of your paragraphs of information, subheadings, and visuals. You don't need to actually write the paragraphs or draw the images; just draw boxes relative in size to the writing or feature to mark how everything will fit on the page.

B.  Continue reading your independent reading book.

  • In this lesson, students analyze authentic informative consumer guides to determine the features they need to include on their own guides.
  • Students also select images they would like to use in their guides in this lesson. Depending on the technology you have available for students, this could be done in different ways. If students are creating their guides on the computer, they could insert clip art or images/charts from the Web found through Internet searches; for example, "Overfishing charts." If students are handwriting their guides, they could either cut out printed images, charts, and graphs or hand-copy from World without Fish and the research materials used in Lessons 2-5. Give students who enjoy creative art the opportunity to draw their own images and designs, but emphasize that somewhere there should be an informative visual, like a graph or chart.
  • In advance:

-   Prepare age-appropriate informative consumer guides. Where possible, try to give each triad a different guide. The model informative consumer guide from Lesson 1 could be used as a teacher model. Ensure there are as many of the features listed in Work Time B in each one as possible. Students may want to refer to these models once they begin drafting their own guides in Lesson 12.

-   Prepare resources for students to access images and charts to use on their guides and determine how they are going to record their choices. For example, if you are providing them with print-outs of images to cut out and use, they will need to store those somewhere until they are ready to use them. If they are using visuals on the computer, they will need to be able to store their selected visuals in an easily accessible folder.

  • Post: Learning targets.

Materials

  • Examples of informative consumer guides (one per triad and one to display)
  • Marker (one per team and one for teacher)
  • Informative Consumer Guide anchor chart (begun in Lesson 1)
  • Performance Task Prompt: Informative Consumer Guide (from Lesson 1; one per student)
  • Images and charts (see Teaching Notes)
  • Blank paper (two pieces per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Unpacking Learning Targets (3 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and read them aloud:

*   "I can identify the features of an informative consumer guide."

*   "I can select visuals like images, charts, and graphs to make my informative consumer guide eye-catching and to help consumers better understand the issue of overfishing and fish depletion."

  • Ask students to discuss with an elbow partner:

*   "Why are we identifying the features of an informative consumer guide? How will that help us to create an informative consumer guide about buying fish caught using sustainable methods?"

  • Listen for students to explain that identifying the features of an informative consumer guide will help them ensure that they include all of those features in their informative consumer guides, which will make consumers more likely to pick up their guide to use when buying fish.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Identifying the Features of an Informative Consumer Guide (15 minutes)

  • Ask students to arrange themselves into triads. Explain that today students are going to be looking at real informative consumer guides to determine the features. Ask students:

*   "What do I mean by features?"

  • Cold call students for their responses. Listen for and guide students to understand that the features are the things outside of the content. For example, a title is a feature.
  • Explain that not only are they going to identify features but they are going to identify the purpose of each feature, too.
  • Display an informative consumer guide. Circle the title with a marker. Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "What is the purpose of the title?"

  • Select students to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that the purpose is to catch the readers' attention and give them an idea of what the informative consumer guide is about.
  • Annotate the title of the consumer guide with the purpose. Distribute examples of informative consumer guides and markers, one to each team, and invite triads to do the same.
  • Circulate to assist triads. Ask guiding questions:

*   "Why have you circled that feature?"

*   "What is the purpose of that feature?"

  • Refocus students whole group. Cold call triads to share what they found with the whole group.
  • Record student suggestions on the Informative Consumer Guide anchor chart. Ensure the following is included:

-   Title--to grab the readers' attention and give them an idea of what the content of the guide is about

-   Large and colorful font--the grab the readers' attention

-   Images--to make the guide look appealing so that people want to pick it up and support the content of the text

-   Charts and graphs--to provide consumers with more information and to help them understand the information presented

-   Subheadings--to organize the information and to make the content appear more manageable to read

-   Bite-sized pieces of information--to make the information easy to read

  • Inviting students to analyze authentic models can give them a clearer idea of what their final product should look like.

B. Selecting Visuals for the Informative Consumer Guide (20 minutes)

  • Ask students to take out their Performance Task Prompt: Informative Consumer Guide and to reread it.
  • Invite students to focus students on the bullet that reads: "Include visuals such as pictures and charts or graphs to make it eye-catching and to improve consumer understanding of the issue."
  • Remind students of visuals on the informative consumer guides they just analyzed with their triad. Emphasize that there are just enough visuals for the guides to be eye-catching, but not so many they are cluttered. Explain to students that if there are too many images, it can make it less eye-catching, and it can distract the consumer from the important information captured in the writing.
  • Direct students' attention to the images and charts available (dependent on your resources).
  • Explain that in the same way they evaluated the information and quotes they collected in research to choose the content of their writing for their guides, they are going to evaluate the images and charts to choose which ones will go into their guides.
  • Explain that students may also be creative and draw their own images and designs to make their guides eye-catching, but they also need to include informative visuals like charts and/or graphs to inform consumers.
  • Emphasize that students should consider the information and quotes recorded on their Quote Sandwich graphic organizers when evaluating, selecting, and designing visuals because the visuals they select should support the content of their writing.
  • Invite students to evaluate and select the visuals to use on their guides.
  • Students who are designing their own visuals or copying from other resources will need blank paper to practice their designs on.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Pair Share (7 minutes)

  • Invite students to get into new pairs to share the visuals they have chosen and to justify why they have chosen them.
  • Encourage students to help each other ensure that they have only selected the most relevant visuals for their content. Remind students that they will only have one piece of letter-sized paper and they need to make sure the information is clear, so they don't want too many visuals.
  • Distribute a second sheet of blank paper for homework.
  • Asking students to justify their choices to another student can help them realize whether the choices they have made are appropriate or not.
  • Consider pairing ELL students to deepen the discussion they have about the choices they have made.

Homework

Homework
  • Look at the layout of the model and consider the layout of the informative consumer guides you have studied today. Sketch out on your blank paper where you are going to record each of your paragraphs of information, subheadings, and visuals. You don't need to actually write the paragraphs or draw the images; just draw boxes relative in size to the writing or feature to mark how everything will fit on the page.
  • Continue reading your independent reading book.

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