End of Unit Assessment: Drafting the Informative Consumer Guide | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M3B:U3:L10

End of Unit Assessment: Drafting the Informative Consumer Guide

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can write informative/explanatory texts that convey ideas and concepts using relevant information that is carefully selected and organized. (W.6.2)
  • I can introduce the topic of my text. (W.6.2a)
  • I can organize my information using various strategies (e.g., definition/classification, comparison/contrast, cause/effect). (W.6.2a)
  • I can include headings, graphics, and multimedia to help readers understand my ideas. (W.6.2a)
  • I can develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, and quotations. (W.6.2b)
  • I can use transitions to clarify relationships among my ideas. (W.6.2c)
  • I can use contextually specific language/vocabulary to inform or explain about a topic. (W.6.2d)
  • I can establish and maintain a formal style in my writing. (W.6.2e)
  • I can construct a concluding statement or section of an informative/explanatory text. (W6.2f)
  • I can use evidence from a variety of grade-appropriate texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.6.9)

Supporting Targets

  • I can use domain-specific vocabulary in my informative consumer guide.
  • I can draft the written content of a relevant and compelling informative consumer guide to inform people who are buying fish about how and why to buy fish caught using sustainable methods.
  • I can maintain a formal style in my writing.

Ongoing Assessment

  • End of Unit 3 Assessment: Draft of Written Content of Informative Consumer Guide

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A.  Partner Feedback: Subheadings (3 minutes)

B.  Unpacking Learning Targets (4 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A.  Language Mini Lesson: Formal Style (10 minutes)

B.  Drafting the Informative Consumer Guide (25 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A.  Debrief (3 minutes)

4.  Homework

A.  If you haven't already done so, finish writing the content of your informative consumer guide.

B.  Continue reading your independent reading book.

  • In this lesson, students begin the End of Unit 3 Assessment. To do so, they draft the written content of their informative consumer guide using their Quote Sandwich graphic organizers. Make it clear to students that they do not have to plan the layout of their consumer guide or think about visual images or charts in this lesson. This is assessing only written content. The performance task will assess the completed guide.
  • This is the first lesson in which students will draft their bulleted list of suggestions for ways to buy fish caught using sustainable fishing methods in this lesson.
  • Assess informative consumer guides against Rows 1 and 2 of the New York State Grades 6-8 Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric. Provide students with a star (something they have done well) and a step (something they could improve on) for each of rows 1 and 2 of the rubric. Students will need their drafts in Lesson 12 for a peer critique, but they will not need teacher feedback from the End of Unit 3 Assessment until Lesson 13.
  • Be prepared to return and collect again the drafts in Lesson 12 to have feedback ready for students in Lesson 13.
  • Some students may need additional time to finish their drafts. Allow these students to take their work home to finish it, but emphasize that it must be returned in the next lesson so you can assess it.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

domain-specific vocabulary

Materials

  • Quote Sandwich graphic organizers (from Lessons 8 and 9; three per student)
  • Word-catchers (completed across the module)
  • Mid-Unit 3 Assessment Part 1: Researching Information about Buying Fish Caught Using Sustainable Methods (completed in Lesson 5)
  • End of Unit 3 Assessment: Draft of Written Content of Informative Consumer Guide (one per student)
  • Performance Task Prompt: Informative Consumer Guide (from Lesson 1; one to display)
  • Model informative consumer guide (from Lesson 1; one per student)
  • Model Quote Sandwich Guide: Are You Buying Fruits and Vegetables Today? (from Lesson 8; one per student)
  • Formal style examples (one to display)
  • Formal Style anchor chart (new; co-created during Work Time A)
  • New York State Grades 6-8 Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric (from Lesson 1; one to display)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Partner Feedback: Subheadings (3 minutes)

  • Invite students to take out their Quote Sandwich graphic organizers.
  • Tell students they will be sharing the subheadings drafted for homework with a partner.
  • Ask students to find an elbow partner to share with.
  • Record the following sentence starters on the board:
  1. "Your subheadings lead me to expect ... will follow"
  2. "The words that draw me in are ..."
  • Invite students to review the subheading of their elbow partners' newspaper articles and to use the two sentence starters provided to give feedback.
  • Invite students to revise their headline and subheading based on the feedback they received if needed.
  • Reviewing homework can hold students accountable for completing homework. It can also give you an opportunity to see who is completing homework and who isn't.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (4 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and read them aloud:

*   "I can use domain-specific vocabulary in my informative consumer guide."

*   "I can draft the written content of a relevant and compelling informative consumer guide to inform people who are buying fish about how and why to buy fish caught using sustainable methods."

*   "I can maintain a formal style in my writing."

  • Tell students that domain-specific vocabulary is words specific to a topic or study.
  • Tell students to take out their word-catchers for the whole module.
  • Ask students to consider:

*   "What words are good examples of domain-specific vocabulary that you want to use in your informative consumer guides?"

  • Ask for volunteers and listen for examples such as: trawling, depleted, extinct, hook-and-line, ecosystem, environment, by-catch, etc.
  • Consider making a Word Wall list from student examples that can be referenced while students are writing. 
  • Invite students to turn and talk:

*   "Now that you have seen the learning targets for this lesson, what do you think you will be doing today?"

  • Listen for: "We going to use our Quote Sandwich graphic organizers to draft the written content of our informative consumer guides, making sure we use domain-specific words."
  • Remind students to use their Quote Sandwich graphic organizers for all of the sections they need to include apart from the suggestions for buying fish caught using sustainable methods. That section should be a bulleted or numbered list rather than a paragraph like the other sections. Remind students that they have circled the suggestions they would like to use on their Mid-Unit 3 Assessment Part 1: Researching Information about Buying Fish Caught Using Sustainable Methods.
  • Distribute End of Unit 3 Assessment: Draft of Written Content of Informative Consumer Guide.
  • Invite students to read the directions.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Language Mini Lesson: Formal Style (10 minutes)

  • Display the Performance Task Prompt: Informative Consumer Guide and invite students to reread itto ground themselves in what is expected of them on the End of Unit 3 Assessment.
  • Ask students to take out their model informative consumer guide and Model Quote Sandwich Guide: Are You Buying Fruits and Vegetables Today?
  • Invite them to reread both of these documents
  • Ask students to turn and talk with an elbow partner:

*   "How did the author of the model informative consumer guide use the Quote Sandwich to write that paragraph of the model essay?"

  • Select volunteers to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that the author joined the pieces of the Quote Sandwich together to write the paragraph.
  • Explain that students are going to do exactly that as they draft the paragraphs for their informative consumer guide.
  • Remind them that the learning target requests that they maintain a formal style.
  • Display the formal style examples.
  • Explain that the first example is the paragraph from the Model Informative Consumer Guide, and the second example is a less formal version. Invite them to read both of the examples with you aloud.
  • Ask students to turn and talk:

*   "In what ways does the first example sound more formal?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that the first example is more formal because it sounds like something you would read in a textbook--it sounds like the person writing is an expert who really knows what he or she is talking about, whereas the second example sounds like someone speaking to a friend. The vocabulary in the first example is more precise and complex, and the vocabulary in the second is simple and includes slang.
  • Record students' responses on the Formal Style anchor chart. Ensure that the following are included:

-   Avoid using contractions (e.g., instead of "don't," use "do not").

-   Avoid using slang (e.g., instead of "awesome," use "very good").

-   Use more varied and mature vocabulary (e.g., "negative" instead of "bad").

  • Providing good and bad examples for students to compare can highlight the differences between good and bad work and provide them with guidelines and expectations.

B. Drafting the Informative Consumer Guide (25 minutes)

  • Reassure students that they don't have to have the final informative consumer guide finished by the end of this lesson--just a draft of the written content. Make it clear that they will add images, charts, and graphs in the next lesson.
  • Display the New York State Grades 6-8 Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric. Invite students to read Column 3 to remind themselves of what their writing should include.
  • Direct student's attention to Row 1, where it says: "Clearly introduce a topic in a manner that follows from the task and purpose."
  • Ask students:

* "What information are you going to include first to introduce the topic and to prepare the reader for what comes next?"

  • Ask volunteers to share their responses. Listen for students to explain that they need to introduce their information about the issue of overfishing and fish depletion before anything else, so the reader understands the issue and understand why the rest of the information is important.
  • Direct students' attention to Row 3 where it says: "Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from the topic and information presented."
  • Ask students:

* "What information are you going to use to conclude the informative consumer guide? What are you going to leave the consumer with to think about? Why?"

  • Select volunteers to share their responses. Listen for students to explain that they need to finish with the suggestions for how to buy fish caught using sustainable methods, so the consumers remember and apply what they have learned when making their fish purchases.
  • Tell students that now they are going to draft the written content of their informative consumer guides. Make it clear that students do not need to be concerned about the layout or the look of it--this assessment is only assessing the written content.
  • Remind students to use all the resources they have collected as a class over the past weeks to write their article. List the resources on the board:

-   Performance Task Prompt: Informative Consumer Guide

-   Model informative consumer guide

-   The NYS Grades 6-8 Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric

-   Their completed Quote Sandwich graphic organizers

-   Their completed Mid-Unit 3 Assessment Part 1: Researching Information about Buying Fish Caught Using Sustainable Methods 

-   Formal Style anchor chart

  • Ask them to begin independently drafting the written content of their informative consumer guide.
  • Circulate to support students by reviewing the model with them as an example as needed.
  • Some students may benefit from speaking ideas aloud before writing them down. Organize these students into a group to work with you away from other students who need to work quietly.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Debrief (3 minutes)

  • Refocus students whole group.
  • Ask students to look over their drafts and to discuss in triads:

*   "How do you think you have done? What went well in your drafting? Why?"

*   "What didn't go so well? Why not?"

*   "What do you think you could improve upon? Why?"

  • The debrief after the assessment can help build a culture of achievement in your classroom.

Homework

Homework
  • If you haven't already done so, finish writing the content of your informative consumer guide.
  • Continue reading your independent reading book.

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