Analyzing a Model Informative Consumer Guide | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M3B:U3:L1

Analyzing a Model Informative Consumer Guide

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can write informative/explanatory texts that convey ideas and concepts using relevant information that is carefully selected and organized. (W.6.2)
  • I can use evidence from a variety of grade-appropriate texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.6.9)

Supporting Targets

  • I can find the gist of the model informative consumer guide.
  • I can determine the main ideas of a model informative consumer guide.
  • I can explain the purpose of an informative consumer guide.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Annotations on Model informative consumer guide

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A.  Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

B.  Partner Discussion: The Purpose of an Informative Consumer Guide (6 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A.  Unpacking the Prompt and Introducing the Rubric (12 minutes)

B.  Reading the Model Informative Consumer Guide (15 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A.  Analyzing Content of the Model Informative Consumer Guide (10 minutes)

4.  Homework

A.  Read up to page 97 of Chapter 7 of World without Fish. Remember to record new words on your word-catcher. Use evidence flags to gather evidence as you read to answer the focus question on your structured notes:

  • According to Mark Kurlansky, what are some solutions to the issue of fish depletion? According to Kurlansky, why won't they work?

B.  Continue reading your independent reading book.

  • This lesson launches the performance task in which students will create an informative consumer guide to answer the question: What do consumers need to know about overfishing and fish depletion when buying fish? The task requires students to research about overfishing methods, sustainable fishing methods, case studies of depletion of particular fish species, and suggestions for how to buy fish that have been caught using sustainable methods. They then compile this research into an informative consumer guide using evidence from research sources to support their claims.
  • The New York State Grades 6-8 Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric will be used to assess student informative consumer guides. Students will review the rubric briefly in this lesson, but will use it to evaluate their own writing in later lessons.
  • In later lessons, students will need their annotated model informative consumer guide. Use routines of your classroom to help students keep track of these resources.
  • Students continue the homework routine of taking structured notes and using evidence flags. To streamline routines, consider whether students will record their structured notes on a handout or in their journals. Also consider giving each student one baggie with evidence flags, rather than distributing new flags each day.
  • For Lesson 2, prepare the research materials for each triad (see supporting materials).
  • In advance:

-   Review the model informative consumer guide (see supporting materials).

-   Consider preparing the research materials each triad will need in Lesson 2 (see supporting materials for Lesson 2). Each triad needs to be allocated one research article and you need enough of each article for one per student. The articles provided range in difficulty--determine how to allocate them by considering the reading level of students in each triad. Each triad needs to be given a glossary for its article, too.

  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

gist, main idea

Materials

  • Informative Consumer Guide anchor chart (new; co-created with students during Opening B)
  • Performance Task Prompt: Informative Consumer Guide (one per student and one for display)
  • Equity sticks
  • New York State Grades 6-8 Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric (one per student and one to display)
  • Model informative consumer guide (one per student and one to display)
  • Evidence flags (three per student for homework)
  • Structured notes (from Unit 2, Lesson 1; one new blank copy per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and read them aloud:

*   "I can find the gist of the model informative consumer guide."

*   "I can determine the main ideas of a model informative consumer guide."

*   "I can explain the purpose of an informative consumer guide."

  • Remind students of what finding the gist means. Tell students that their performance task will be to create an informative consumer guide for people about buying fish that have been caught using sustainable fishing methods.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

B. Partner Discussion: The Purpose of an Informative Consumer Guide (6 minutes)

  • Pair students up and ask them to discuss:

*   "What is an informative consumer guide?"

  • Cold call pairs to share their ideas. Listen for and guide students to the understanding that an informative consumer guide is a brochure to guide people in making choices when they are buying something.
  • Post the following questions. Then ask students to discuss in pairs:

*   "What is the purpose of an informative consumer guide?"

*   "What do consumers need/expect from an informative guide? Why?"

  • Cold call pairs to share their ideas. This is only an initial discussion as students have not yet looked at any guides and some students may never have seen one before.
  • Record student ideas on the Informative Consumer Guide anchor chart. Ensure the list includes:

-   Describes the problem: describes the problem and the link to the products they are looking to buy

-   Provides a solution: explains how the problem can be solved

-   Provides an example/case study: evidence and elaboration

-   Provide consumers with advice and suggestions: how and what to buy to help with this issue

  • Capturing whole-class thinking on an anchor chart can ensure quick reference later on.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Unpacking the Prompt and Introducing the Rubric (12 minutes)

  • Display and distribute Performance Task Prompt: Informative Consumer Guide.
  • Invite students to follow along with you as you read the prompt aloud.
  • Ask students to circle any unfamiliar words. Clarify words as needed.
  • Ask students to think back to the work they did in Unit 1. Remind them that they read the first five chapters of Mark Kurlansky's World without Fish, in which the problem of fish depletion due to overfishing was presented.
  • Ask students to discuss in pairs:

*   "What can you remember about the issue of fish depletion and overfishing?"

  • Consider using equity sticks to select students to share out their responses.
  • Ask students to discuss in pairs:

*   "What is a consumer? What is an informative consumer guide?"

  • Select students to share out their ideas. Listen for students to explain that a consumer is someone who buys something and an informative consumer guide is a guide that provides information about what to buy.
  • Ask students to discuss in pairs:

*   "What is the Performance Task Prompt asking you to do?"

*   "What will your writing have to include to address the question?"

  • Circulate and listen for students to list each of the bullet points on the prompt when describing what their writing should include.
  • Display and distribute the New York State Grades 6-8 Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric.
  • Remind students that they should be familiar with this rubric from previous modules and that they will be assessed according to this rubric.
  • Ask students to review the criteria of the rubric with you. Select volunteers to read aloud each criterion. 
  • Invite students to turn and talk with their partner:

*   "Which criterion do you think is a strength for you? Why?"

*   "Which criterion do you think is a challenge for you? Why? How can you work on this?"

  • Cold call students to share out their responses.
  • Consider providing select students with a pre-highlighted version of the Performance Task Prompt that highlights the explicit actions students must take to complete the task.

B. Reading the Model Informative Consumer Guide (15 minutes)

  • Congratulate students for unwrapping the Performance Task Prompt.
  • Display and distribute the model informative consumer guide.
  • Tell them they will now begin reading like a writer by studying a model informative consumer guide.
  • Give students the focus question for the model:

* "What do consumers need to know about chemical pesticides and fertilizers when buying fresh fruit and vegetables?"

  • Guide students to see the difference between the focus question in the prompt versus the model by asking students to discuss in pairs:

*    "What is the difference between the focus question in your prompt and the focus question in this model?"

  • Select students to share their responses with the whole group. Listen for students to explain that the focus questions are very similar, but instead of discussing the issue of fish depletion and overfishing in relation to buying fish, the model discusses the issue of pesticides and buying fruit and vegetables.
  • Invite students to follow along while you read the model informative consumer guide aloud.
  • Ask students to discuss in pairs:

*   "What is this model mostly about?"

  • Consider using equity sticks to select students to share their responses. Listen for students to explain that the model is mostly about how chemical pesticides and fertilizers are used in the process of growing fruits and vegetables and that they can cause health issues, so where possible, we should buy organic fruits and vegetables because they are grown without chemical pesticides and fertilizers.
  • Explain that now students will work in pairs to reread and annotate each paragraph of the model for the gist or to get an idea of what each of the paragraphs is mostly about.
  • Remind students to discuss the gist of each paragraph in their pairs before recording anything.
  • Ask students to begin.
  • Circulate and observe student annotations and invite students who are struggling to say the gist aloud to you before recording it.
  • Hearing a complex text read slowly, fluently, and without interruption or explanation promotes fluency for students; they are hearing a strong reader read the text aloud with accuracy and expression, and are simultaneously looking at and thinking about the words on the printed page. Be sure to set clear expectations that students read along silently in their heads as you read the text aloud.
  • Consider allowing students to grapple with a complex text prior to explicit teaching of vocabulary. After students have read for the gist, they can identify challenging vocabulary for themselves. Teachers can address student-selected vocabulary as well as predetermined vocabulary upon subsequent encounters with the text. However, in some cases and with some students, pre-teaching selected vocabulary may be necessary.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Analyzing Content of the Model Informative Consumer Guide (10 minutes)

  • Explain to students that now they will synthesize their thinking about the model informative consumer guide.
  • Give students 1 minute to review their annotations.
  • Then, have them turn to a new partner and discuss their annotations.
  • Invite students to share their annotations with the whole group. Ask:

*   "What is the main idea of the first paragraph in the model informative consumer guide?"

*   "What is the main idea of the second paragraph?"

  • Select volunteers to share their responses. Listen for students to explain:

-   Some fruits and vegetables are grown using chemical pesticides and fertilizers that may cause health problems.

-   Research shows that some pesticides may be linked to ADHD and the development and growth of children.

-   Eating organic food is a way to prevent consuming pesticides because it is grown without chemical pesticides and fertilizers.

-   Research shows that eating organic fruits and vegetables can lower the levels of certain pesticides in urine.

-   Suggestions for consuming fewer chemicals from non-organic fertilizers and pesticides.

  • Preview homework and distribute the structured notes and evidence flags.

Homework

Homework
  • Read up to page 97 of Chapter 7 of World without Fish. Remember to record new words on your word-catcher. Use evidence flags to gather evidence as you read to answer the focus question on your structured notes:

-   According to Mark Kurlansky, what are some solutions to the issue of fish depletion? According to Kurlansky, why won't they work?

  • Continue reading your independent reading book.

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