Finding Evidence of Carl Hiaasen’s Perspective in Flush | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M3B:U2:L9

Finding Evidence of Carl Hiaasen’s Perspective in Flush

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can explain how an author's geographic location or culture affects his or her perspective. (RL.6.6a)

Supporting Targets

  • I can identify evidence of Carl Hiaasen's perspective in Flush.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Structured notes: Chapters 13 and 14 (from homework)
  • Finding Evidence of Carl Hiaasen's Perspective in Flush graphic organizer

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A.  Engaging the Reader: Chapters 13 and 14 of Flush (10 minutes)

B.  Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A.  Summarizing Carl Hiaasen's Perspective of Florida (10 minutes)

B.  Identifying Evidence of Hiaasen's Perspective in Flush (20 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A.  Debrief (3 minutes)

4.  Homework

A.  Read Chapters 15 and 16 of Flush. As you read, mark the text with evidence flags to help you answer the focus question in your structured notes.

B.  Record new vocabulary on your word-catcher.

  • In this lesson, students work in triads to identify evidence of Carl Hiaasen's perspective of Florida in Flush. In order to gather as much evidence as possible, each student in the triad will analyze a different excerpt of Flush. To save time, be prepared to assign excerpts to students.
  • Collect students' Finding Evidence of Carl Hiaasen's Perspective in Flush graphic organizer at the end of the lesson and look them over to determine which students might need extra guidance or assistance before they are assessed against these standards in Lesson 11.
  • In advance:

-   Review Mix and Mingle Checking for Understanding technique (see Appendix) and have music ready to use for the opening of this lesson.

  • Post: Learning targets; Flush Plot Development anchor chart.

Vocabulary

No new vocabulary

Materials

  • Equity sticks
  • Flush Plot Development anchor chart (from Lesson 2)
  • Finding Evidence of Carl Hiaasen's Perspective in Flush graphic organizer (one per student and one for display)
  • Finding Evidence of Carl Hiaasen's Perspective in Flush graphic organizer (suggested answers, for teacher reference)
  • Flush (book; distributed in Lesson 1)
  • Structured notes (from Lesson 1; one new blank copy per student)
  • Evidence flags (at least three per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Chapters 13 and 14 of Flush (10 minutes)

  • Remind students that for homework they were to read chapters 13 and 14 and record their answers to the focus question in their structured notes. Ask students to retrieve the handout and prepare for Mix and Mingle.
  • Mix and Mingle:
  1. Play music. Invite students to move around the room with their structured notes.
  2. After 15 seconds, stop the music.
  3. Invite students to share their answer to the following question with the person standing closest to them: "What happens in Chapter 12?"
  4. Repeat Steps 1 and 2.
  5. Invite students to share their answer to the following question with the person standing closest to them: "What happens in Chapter 13?"
  6. Repeat Steps 1 and 2.
  7. Invite students to share their answer to the following question with the person standing closes to them: "How do those events contribute to the rising action of the plot?"
  • Refocus whole class and consider using equity sticks to call on few students to summarize the plot development in Chapters 13 and 14. Add to the posted Flush Plot Development anchor chart something like: "13 and 14--Another conflict between Jasper and Noah is stopped by a new character, an old man. Bull comes to apologize, which relieves some of the tension in that conflict. Tension builds as Noah, Shelly, and Abbey cook up a dangerous plan to put food dye in the sewage system of the Coral Queen."
  • Reviewing homework holds all students accountable for reading the novel and completing their homework.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Invite students to silently follow along as you read the learning targets aloud:

*   "I can identify evidence of Carl Hiaasen's perspective in Flush."

  • Remind students of what perspective means.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.
  • Discussing and clarifying the language of learning targets helps build academic vocabulary.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Summarizing Carl Hiaasen's Perspective of Florida (10 minutes)

  • Display and distribute Finding Evidence of Carl Hiaasen's Perspective in Flush graphic organizer.
  • Invite students to read through the first three directions on the first page of the graphic organizer with you:

-   Read back through all the inferences you have made about Carl Hiaasen's perspective of Florida on your Gathering Evidence of Hiaasen's Perspective graphic organizers from Lessons 6-8.

-   Look for the common themes in each of the perspectives you have inferred and combine those to write a short summary (no more than two sentences) describing Carl Hiaasen's perspective of Florida, using the sentence starter in the top row of the Claim column.

-   Record that summary in the first column of your organizer.

  • Model the process with a volunteer student. Ask the student:

*   "What similarities do you see between all of the perspectives you have inferred? What are some common ideas and themes?"

  • Listen for the student to suggest things like: "He loves Florida," "He loves the nature and the water," and "He doesn't like the development and exploitation." Record these themes on the displayed organizer and explain that identifying these common themes will help students to summarize Carl Hiaasen's perspective of Florida.
  • Model combining those themes into one short paragraph. Use Finding Evidence of Carl Hiaasen's Perspective in Flush graphic organizer (suggested answers, for teacher reference) to help you fill out the first column of the displayed graphic organizer.
  • Invite students to follow the first three directions in the same way to independently summarize the perspectives of Florida that they have inferred. Explain that they may talk to other students, but this is independent work, so ultimately the ideas and writing should be their own.
  • Circulate to assist. Ask:

*   "What similarities do you see between all of the perspectives you have inferred? What are some common ideas and themes?"

*   "How can you combine those ideas into one summary paragraph of just a couple of sentences?"

  • Some students may benefit from saying their summary aloud to you before recording it on their organizer. Invite those students to sit in a group close to you so that you can work with them.

B. Identifying Evidence of Hiaasen's Perspective in Flush (20 minutes)

  • Tell students that now they have inferred how being born and raised in Florida has affected Carl Hiaasen's perspective of the place, they need to look for evidence of that perspective in Flush.
  • Tell students that in triads they are going to reread excerpts of Flush to look for evidence of where Carl Hiaasen may have communicated his perspective of Florida.
  • Invite students to read steps 4 - 7 with you in the directions. Emphasize to students the direction that each student in their triad needs to be assigned one set of page numbers to analyze.
  • Tell students that you are going to model this with pages 27-29 . Fill out the displayed organizer as a model for the whole group. Refer to the Finding Evidence of Carl Hiaasen's Perspective in Flush graphic organizer (suggested answers, for teacher reference).
  • Invite students to follow steps 4-7 to do the same thing with the page numbers listed.
  • Circulate to listen to triad discussions. Ask the following question as necessary to help students stay focused on the task:

*   "How is that evidence of Carl Hiaasen's perspective of Florida?"

  • Refocus whole group. Consider using equity sticks to select students to share their responses with the whole group. Guide students using Finding Evidence of Carl Hiaasen's Perspective in Flush graphic organizer (suggested answers, for teacher reference).
  • Collect students' Finding Evidence of Carl Hiaasen's Perspective in Flush graphic organizers at the end of the lesson and look them over to determine which students might need extra guidance or assistance before they are assessed against these standards in Lesson 11.
  • Asking students to discuss prompts before recording their answers helps to ensure that all students have an idea about what to write and can give students confidence in their responses.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Debrief (3 minutes)

  • Fist to Five: Ask students to share how confident they feel about their progress on each of the learning targets by holding up anywhere from zero (low) to five (high) fingers. Make a note of those students who hold low numbers of fingers in order to address their concerns in the next lesson before they are assessed in Lesson 11.
  • Preview homework and distribute structured notes and evidence flags.
  • Inviting students to self-assess can help you gauge who requires additional support and guidance before the end of unit assessment.

Homework

Homework
  • Read Chapters 15 and 16 of Flush. As you read, mark the text with at least three evidence flags to help you answer this focus question in your structured notes:

*   "What happens in these chapters and how do those events contribute to the plot?"

  • Record any new vocabulary on your word-catcher.

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