Mid-Unit Assessment: Analyzing Point of View and Plot Development in Flush | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M3B:U2:L5

Mid-Unit Assessment: Analyzing Point of View and Plot Development in Flush

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can determine the meaning of literal, connotative, and figurative language (metaphors and similes) in literary text. (RL.6.4)
  • I can analyze how an author's word choice affects tone and meaning in a literary text. (RL.6.4)
  • I can analyze how a particular sentence, stanza, scene, or chapter fits in and contributes to the development of a literary text. (RL.6.5)
  • I can analyze how an author develops a narrator or speaker's point of view. (RL.6.6)
  • I can use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or paragraph, a word's position or function in a sentence) to determine the meaning of a word or phrase. (L.6.4a)

Supporting Targets

  • I can determine the meaning of words and phrases in the text.
  • I can analyze how the word choice affects tone and meaning.
  • I can analyze how Hiaasen develops Noah's point of view.
  • I can explain how a chapter contributes to plot development.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Structured notes: Chapters 6 and 7 (from homework)
  • Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Point of View, Figurative Language, and Plot Development in Flush
  • Flush Plot Development anchor chart

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A.  Engaging the Reader: Chapters 6 and 7 of Flush (7 minutes)

B.  Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A.  Mid-Unit 2 Assessment (33 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A.  Debrief (3 minutes)

4.  Homework

A.  Read the rest of Chapter 8. As you read, mark the text with evidence flags to help you answer the focus question in your structured notes.

B.  Record new vocabulary words on your word-catcher.

  • In this Mid-Unit 2 Assessment, students read a passage of Flush and are asked to identify and interpret the point of view and use of figurative language in the passage. They do this in a graphic organizer nearly identical to the one they have been using to track point of view throughout the novel so far. Students are then asked a series of short constructed response questions about figurative language, word choice, and plot development.
  • Assess student responses using the NYS Grade 6 2-Point Rubric--Short Response. There are also suggested answers in the supporting materials, but be aware that student answers may differ from those suggested--they are to be used as a guideline for the kind of responses to look for.
  • Consider allowing time for catch-up reading to ensure all students are at the same place in the book.
  • In advance:

-   Review Concentric Circles protocol (see Appendix).

  • Post: Learning targets; Plot Development: The Rising Action in Flush anchor chart; Flush Plot Development anchor chart.

Vocabulary

Do not preview vocabulary.

Materials

  • Plot Development: The Rising Action in Flush anchor chart (from Lesson 3)
  • Plot Development: The Rising Action in Flush anchor chart (answers, for teacher reference)
  • Flush Plot Development anchor chart (from Lesson 2)
  • Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Analyzing Point of View and Plot Development in Flush (one per student)
  • Flush (book; distributed in Lesson 1)
  • Sticky notes (five per student)
  • Colored pencils or markers (blue and one other color; one of each color per student)
  • Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Analyzing Point of View and Plot Development in Flush (suggested answers, for teacher reference)
  • NYS Grade 6 2-Point Rubric--Short Response (for teacher reference)
  • Structured notes (from Lesson 1; one new blank copy per student)
  • Evidence flags (at least three per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Chapters 6 and 7 of Flush (7 minutes)

  • Invite students to refer to their structured notes homeworkand the answer to the focus question:

*   "What does Shelly think of Lice in Chapter 6? How do you know?"

  • Remind students of Concentric Circles protocol:
  1. Split the group in half. Invite one half to make a circle facing out and the other half to make a circle around them, facing in.
  2. Ensure that all students are facing someone opposite them.
  3. Ask: "What happened in Chapter 6?"
  4. Invite students to share their answers with the person opposite them.
  5. Invite students on the inside circle to move two people to the right.
  6. Ask: "What happened in Chapter 7?"
  7. Invite students on the inside circle to move two people to the right.
  8. Ask: "What does Shelly think of Lice in Chapter 6? How do you know?"
  9. Invite students to share their answers to with the person opposite them.
  • Refocus whole group. Invite volunteers to share their answers with the whole group. Listen and write student answers on the displayed Plot Development: The Rising Action in Flush anchor chart. For guidance, see Plot Development: The Rising Action in Flush anchor chart (answers, for teacher reference).
  • Direct students' attention to the posted Flush Plot Development anchor chart and add a summative statement for Chapters 6 and 7. For example: "Tension builds with the possibility that Noah's dad could actually be wrong and there is disappointment that Lice, who Noah's dad has been pinning his hopes on, has gone. The tension about the sewage tank is relieved when we find out the sewage tank isn't used."
  • Opening the lesson by asking students to share their homework makes them accountable for completing it. It also gives you the opportunity to monitor which students are not doing their homework.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Invite students to read the learning targets with you:

*   "I can determine the meaning of words and phrases in the text."

*   "I can analyze how the word choice affects tone and meaning."

*    "I can analyze how Hiaasen develops Noah's point of view."

*   "I can explain how a chapter contributes to plot development."

  • Remind students that these are the same learning targets they have been working with for the past four lessons. Tell them that today they will show how well they can demonstrate these targets independently in an assessment.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Mid-Unit 2 Assessment (33 minutes)

  • Distribute a Mid-Unit 2 Assessment: Analyzing Point of View and Plot Development in Flush to each student. They will also need their text Flush, five sticky notes, and colored pencils or markers.
  • Invite students to read through the learning targets and the prompt with you. Remind them that the graphic organizer on the assessment handout is similar to the one they have been using to analyze point of view in previous lessons.
  • Invite students to read through the questions below the graphic organizer with you. Explain that once they have analyzed the point of view and tone, they are to answer those questions.
  • Remind the class that because this is an assessment, it is to be completed independently. However, if students need assistance, they should raise their hand to speak with a teacher.
  • Explain to students they should independently read the excerpt for gist, and they have the option of using the sticky notes to write down the gist as a tool to support their comprehension.
  • Circulate and support students as they work. During an assessment, your prompting should be minimal.
  • At the conclusion of the allotted time, collect the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment.
  • Congratulate students on their hard work during the assessment.
  • If students receive accommodations for assessment, communicate with the cooperating service providers regarding the practices of instruction in use during this study, as well as the goals of the assessment.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Debrief (3 minutes)

  • Fist to Five. Invite students to reread each of the learning targets with you and to show on their fingers how well they achieved each target with 0 being "not at all" and 5 being "achieved it successfully."
  • Take note of students who show low numbers on their fingers and be sure to address their concerns in the next lesson.
  • Preview homework and distribute structured notes and evidence flags.

Homework

Homework
  • Read the rest of Chapter 8. As you read, mark the text with at least three evidence flags to help you answer this focus question in your structures notes:

*   "What happens in this chapter and how do those events contribute to the plot development?"

  • Record new vocabulary words on your word-catcher.

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