Analyzing Point of View and Figurative Language: Noah’s Point of View of Florida | EL Education Curriculum

You are here

ELA 2012 G6:M3B:U2:L4

Analyzing Point of View and Figurative Language: Noah’s Point of View of Florida

You are here:

Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can determine the meaning of literal, connotative, and figurative language (metaphors and similes) in literary text. (RL.6.4)
  • I can analyze how an author's word choice affects tone and meaning in a literary text. (RL.6.4)
  • I can analyze how a particular sentence, stanza, scene, or chapter fits in and contributes to the development of a literary text. (RL.6.5)
  • I can analyze how an author develops a narrator or speaker's point of view. (RL.6.6)
  • I can use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or paragraph, a word's position or function in a sentence) to determine the meaning of a word or phrase. (L.6.4a)

Supporting Targets

  • I can determine the meaning of connotative and figurative language and analyze how an author's choice of words affects tone and meaning.
  • I can analyze how Carl Hiaasen develops Noah's point of view of the area he lives in.
  • I can analyze how Chapters 4 and 5 contribute to plot development.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Structured notes: Chapters 4 and 5 (from homework)
  • Noah's Point of View graphic organizer: pages 27-29
  • Exit Ticket: Chapters 4 and 5 plot development

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A.  Engaging the Reader: Chapters 4 and 5 of Flush (5 minutes)

B.  Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A.  Rereading Pages 27-29 for Unfamiliar Vocabulary (6 minutes)

B.  Analyzing Point of View, Figurative Language, and Tone: Pages 27-29 (14 minutes)

C.  Determining Author's Techniques: Point of View, Tone, and Meaning (10 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A.  Exit Ticket: Chapters 4 and 5 Plot Development (8 minutes)

4.  Homework

A.  Read Chapters 6 and 7. As you read, mark the text with evidence flags to help you answer the focus question in your structured notes.

  • This lesson is similar in structure to Lesson 3: students work in triads without any teacher modeling to analyze an excerpt of Flush for point of view, figurative language, tone, and meaning. This time, the focus of the analysis is Noah's point of view of the area he lives in. Students go back to Chapter 3 in the book for this analysis. The reason for this is that Noah's point of view of the area he lives in is important in the second half of the unit, when students look for evidence of Carl Hiaasen's perspective of where he lives to address standard RI.6.6a.
  • Instead of filling out the anchor chart to track plot development in this lesson, students fill out an exit ticket that looks exactly like the anchor chart to practice for the upcoming mid-unit assessment.
  • As students are reading two chapters of this novel per night, consider providing catch-up reading time to ensure that all students are at the same place in the text as they go into the mid-unit assessment in the next lesson.
  • In advance:

-   Read pages 27-29 and Noah's Point of View graphic organizer (answers, for teacher reference) to familiarize yourself with what students will be doing and the answers you will need to guide them toward (see supporting materials).

-   Informally assess Noah's Point of View graphic organizer: pages 17-19, collected in Lesson 3. Look for students' ability to make a claim, select text evidence, and appropriately determine tone. Consider making a list of students who need extra support and providing them with descriptive feedback (one thing they did well and one thing they can improve upon with concrete next steps). Pre-determine if you will reteach these students as a small group or circulate to them individually during Work Time B.

  • Post: Learning targets; Though, Word, Action symbols.

Vocabulary

Everglades, mangroves (27), squall, hunkered (28)

Materials

  • Flush (book; distributed in Lesson 1; one per student)
  • Equity sticks
  • Flush word-catcher (from Lesson 1)
  • Dictionaries (at least one per triad)
  • Noah's Point of View graphic organizer: pages 27-29 (one per student)
  • Noah's Point of View graphic organizer: pages 27-29 (answers, for teacher reference)
  • Thought, Word, Action symbols (from Lesson 1; one for display)
  • Colored pencils or markers (blue and one other color; one of each color per student)
  • Plot Development: The Rising Action in Flush anchor chart (from Lesson 3)
  • Exit Ticket: Chapters 4 and 5 Plot Development (one per student)
  • Exit Ticket: Chapters 4 and 5 Plot Development (answers, for teacher reference)
  • Flush Plot Development anchor chart (from Lesson 2)
  • Structured notes (from Lesson 1; one new blank copy per student)
  • Evidence flags (at least three per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Chapters 4 and 5 of Flush (5 minutes)

  • Invite students to take out Flush. Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "What happened in Chapters 4 and 5?"

  • Select volunteers to share their answers. Listen for students to explain that Noah helps to sink Jasper's boat, the reporter comes to talk to Noah, Noah goes to visit Lice Peeking again to ask for his help in exchange for his dad's skiff, and Noah and Abbey go to the marina at night to see what Dusty Muleman's people are doing to the Coral Queen.
  • Invite students to refer to their structured notes homework to discuss the answer to the focus question in triads: "What does Noah think of Miles Umlatt? How do you know?"
  • Refocus whole class. Select students to share their answers using equity sticks. Listen for students to share something like: "Noah doesn't like him because he makes him nervous." Listen for students to provide evidence like: "He was thin and blotchy, and his nose was scuffed up like an old shoe," (page 40), or "Miles Umlatt wrote that down on his pad, which made me a little nervous. So did the tiny green light blinking on his tape recorder" (page 43).
  • Opening the lesson by asking students to share their homework makes students accountable for completing homework. It also gives you the opportunity to monitor which students have not been completing their homework.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Invite students to read the learning targets with you:

*   "I can determine the meaning of connotative and figurative language and analyze how the an author's choice of words affects tone and meaning."

*   "I can analyze how Carl Hiaasen develops Noah's point of view of the area he lives in."

*   "I can analyze how Chapters 4 and 5 contribute to plot development."

  • Students should be familiar with these learning targets from previous lessons. Remind students of vocabulary they have explored in previous lessons: gist, connotative language, figurative language, tone, point of view, and plot.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Rereading Pages 27-29 for Unfamiliar Vocabulary (6 minutes)

  • Ask students to follow along silently as you read aloud from "In July days get long and stream together," on page 27 to "Rado took him home while I skated alone down the old road, back toward Lice Peeking's place," in the middle of page 29.
  • Distribute dictionaries to each triad. Remind students that they have already read this chapter and recorded unfamiliar words on their Flush word-catchers for homework. Invite students to share any new vocabulary and definitions with their triad. If they were unable to work out the meaning of a word, encourage other students to assist them with the definition. You may need to explain to students that the Everglades is a large area of wetland in Florida and that mangroves are trees that grow in wetland areas.
  • Focus students' attention on the word squall. Invite them to read the sentence containing the word "squall" and the two sentences after to try and figure out what the word means from the context. Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "What do you think a 'squall' might be? Why do you think that? What in those sentences suggests that?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses. Listen for students to explain that a squall must be a storm because it says that they held their skateboards over their heads to keep the raindrops from their eyes and that it took half an hour for the storm to pass. Invite a volunteer to check the meaning of the word in a dictionary and explain to students that squalls are common in the area of Florida that Carl Hiaasen is writing about in Flush.
  • Focus students' attention on the word hunkered. Invite a volunteer to look up the word in a dictionary and to share the meaning with the whole group, as this isn't an easy one to get from context.
  • Remind students to record new words on their word-catchers.
  •  Asking students to identify challenging vocabulary helps them monitor their understanding of a complex text.
  • ELLs may be unfamiliar with more vocabulary words than are mentioned in this lesson. Check for comprehension of general words that most students would know.

B. Analyzing Point of View, Figurative Language, and Tone: Pages 27-29 (14 minutes)

  • Distribute Noah's Point of View graphic organizer: pages 27-29. Remind students that they filled out a similar organizer in Lessons 2 and 3.
  • Explain that in this lesson, they use the graphic organizer to help them analyze pages 27-29 to identify Noah's point of view of the area he lives in.
  • Remind students to read the directions at the top of the graphic organizer.
  • Direct students to work independently to analyze the text. Explain that they will discuss their answers with their triads after they have tried to complete the organizer on their own.
  • Circulate to assist students with analyzing the text for point of view, figurative language, and tone. Refer to Noah's Point of View graphic organizer: pages 27-29 (answers, for teacher reference) to guide students.Consider doing some small group instruction or circulating to certain individuals based on their work on the graphic organizers you collected in the previous lesson. Consider providing students who need it with clear descriptive feedback (for example, one thing they are doing well and one thing they can improve upon with concrete next steps). As you circulate, ask probing questions such as:

*   "What is Noah's point of view of the area he lives in?"

*   "How do you know? Which specific words, phrases, and sentences from the text support your claim about Noah's point of view?"

*   "Based on the images, words, and phrases you have selected, how would you describe the tone of the text with one word?"

  • Invite students to get into triads to share their graphic organizers. Encourage them to add to and revise their graphic organizers based on what they learn from the other people in their triads.
  • Refocus whole group. Remind students that Flush uses figurative language such as similes and metaphors to help us better understand how things look and what characters think and feel.
  • Invite the class to reread the figurative language learning target with you:

*   "I can determine the meaning of connotative and figurative language and analyze how the author's choice of words affects tone and meaning."

  • Direct students to look back at the evidence they recorded in the middle column and ask them to discuss in triads:

*   "Can you identify any figurative language in the notes you have taken? Remember that figurative language is when you describe something by comparing it to something else."

  • Invite students to circle figurative language on their graphic organizers.
  • Use equity sticks to select students to share their responses. Listen for students to say: "I've always enjoyed watching the sky drop down like a foamy purple curtain when a summer storm rumbles across Florida Bay" on page 27.
  • Ask triads to discuss:

*   "What kind of figurative language is this example? How do you know?"

  • Use equity sticks to call on students for their responses. Listen for them to explain that it is a simile, because similes often use "like" or "as" to compare two things.
  • Ask triads to discuss:

*   "Why does Hiaasen use figurative language here? What does it do for the reader?"

  • Listen for students to explain that it helps the reader create a mental picture of what a storm looks like when it rolls into the Florida Bay.
  • Focus students on the sentence, "Thom, Rado, and I hunkered in the mangroves ..."
  • Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "What connotation does the word 'hunkered' suggest? What words could the author have used instead with a different connotation?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses. Listen for students to explain that "hunkered" has the connotation of having to get down really low in a strong, solid position to avoid being blown over. The author could have used the words "squatted" or "crouched down," but those don't have the same effect.
  • Focus students on the sentence, "Only a certified moron would dive in when the beach was posted."
  • Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "What connotation does the word moron suggest? What words could the author have used instead with a different connotation?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses. Listen for students to explain that "moron" has the connotation of someone being dangerously foolish. The author could have used the word "fool," but that doesn't make the person sound such an unclear thinker for doing something that could endanger their life.
  • Graphic organizers and recording forms engage students more actively and provide the necessary scaffolding that is especially critical for learners with lower levels of language proficiency and/or learning
  • When reviewing graphic organizers or recording forms, consider using a document camera to display the document for students who struggle with auditory processing.
  • By using formative assessment, teachers can provide differentiated instruction to students during individual work time through small group or individual instruction.
  • Descriptive feedback is a research-based strategy that supports student achievement by providing feedback on what students are doing well to replicate their thinking and increase engagement. And by providing feedback on what students can do to improve with specific next steps, to build success and increases student engagement.

C. Determining Author's Techniques: Point of View, Tone, and Meaning (10 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the posted Thought, Words, Actions symbols and remind them of the ways authors can develop point of view.
  • Tell students that now they are going to continue to work in triads to analyze how the author has developed point of view by looking at the evidence from the text recorded in the middle column of their graphic organizers. Distribute colored pencils or markers and remind students to underline evidence as follows:

-   Noah's own thoughts, actions, and feelings--blue

-   The words and actions of others--another color

  • Remind students to then code each piece of evidence as a thought, word, or symbol.
  • Refocus whole group. Ask:

*   "So what techniques does Hiaasen use most often to develop Noah's point of view of where he lives in this excerpt?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses with the whole group. Listen for students to explain that in this excerpt, most of Noah's point of view comes from his own thoughts.
  • Invite students to focus on the Tone column of the graphic organizer. Ask triads to share the words they chose and to justify why they infer that tone.
  • Remind students that the tone helps them to determine the point of view because it gives us an idea of what the narrator thinks of or feels about the subject.
  • Asking students to color code and add symbols to their text provides a clear visual reference for analysis.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A.  Exit Ticket: Chapters 4 and 5 Plot Development (8 minutes)

  • Display the Plot Development: The Rising Action in Flush anchor chart. Invite students to reread what has been recorded so far. Read aloud the learning target:

*   "I can analyze how Chapters 4 and 5 contribute to plot development."

  • Distribute Exit Ticket: Chapters 4 and 5 Plot Development and explain to students that it is identical to the anchor chart they have been filling out over the past couple of lessons. Explain to students that in the next lesson they are going to be doing their mid-unit assessment, so this exit ticket is good practice for that. Ask:

*   "What were the main events in Chapters 4 and 5?"

  • Invite students to independently refer to their text and record the main things that happened on the exit ticket.
  • Ask:

*   "How do these events contribute to the plot development? Do they introduce a new character? Do they provide/build on conflict or tension?"

  • Invite students to independently refer to their text and record how the things they recorded in the middle column contributed to the plot development.
  • Select volunteers to share their answers with the whole group. For suggested answers, see Exit Ticket: Chapters 4 and 5 Plot Development (answers, for teacher reference).
  • Display the Flush Plot Development anchor chart. Invite students to synthesize their thinking about plot development:

*   "How did Chapters 4 and 5 contribute to the rising action and plot development in Flush?"

  • Use equity sticks to call on a few students to share their statements with the class. Listen for students to share that in Chapters 4 and 5 the conflict between Jasper and Noah continues, there is tension as Abbey and Noah realize their dad might be in the wrong Record this next to the Rising Action line on the Flush Plot Development anchor chart.
  • Distribute structured notes and evidence flags for homework.
  • Exit tickets allow a check for understanding of the learning targets so that instruction can be adjusted or tailored to students' needs during the lesson or before the next lesson.

Homework

Homework
  • Read Chapters 6 and 7. As you read, mark the text with at least three evidence flags to help you answer this focus question in your structured notes:

*   "What does Shelly think of Lice in Chapter 6? How do you know?"

  • Remember to record any new vocabulary on your word-catcher.

Get updates about our new K-5 curriculum as new materials and tools debut.

Sign Up