Analyzing Point of View and Figurative Language: Noah’s Point of View of Lice Peeking | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M3B:U2:L3

Analyzing Point of View and Figurative Language: Noah’s Point of View of Lice Peeking

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can determine the meaning of literal, connotative, and figurative language (metaphors and similes) in literary text. (RL.6.4)
  • I can analyze how an author's word choice affects tone and meaning in a literary text. (RL.6.4)
  • I can analyze how a particular sentence, stanza, scene, or chapter fits in and contributes to the development of a literary text. (RL.6.5)
  • I can analyze how an author develops a narrator or speaker's point of view. (RL.6.6)
  • I can use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or paragraph, a word's position or function in a sentence) to determine the meaning of a word or phrase. (L.6.4a)

Supporting Targets

  • I can analyze how Carl Hiaasen develops Noah's point of view of Lice Peeking.
  • I can determine the meaning of connotative and figurative language and analyze how the author's choice of words affects tone and meaning.
  • I can analyze how Chapters 2 and 3 contribute to plot development.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Structured notes: Chapters 2 and 3 (from homework)
  • Noah's Point of View graphic organizer: pages 17-19

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A.  Engaging the Reader: Chapters 2 and 3 of Flush (5 minutes)

B.  Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A.  Rereading Pages 17-19 for Unfamiliar Vocabulary (6 minutes)

B.  Analyzing Point of View, Figurative Language, and Tone: Pages 17-19 (15 minutes)

C.  Determining Author's Techniques: Point of View, Tone, and Meaning (8 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A.  Analyzing Plot Development in Chapters 2 and 3 (9 minutes)

4.  Homework

A.  Read Chapters 4 and 5 of Flush. As you read, mark the text with evidence flags to help you answer the focus question in your structured notes.

B.  Record any new vocabulary words on your word-catcher.

  • In preparation for the mid-unit assessment, this lesson begins to gradually release students to work more independently. They work in triads without any teacher modeling to analyze an excerpt of Flush for point of view, figurative language, tone, and meaning.
  • At the end of Work Time C, collect Noah's Point of View graphic organizer: pages 17-19 to check students' understanding of making a claim, selecting text evidence, and determining tone. Consider making a list of students who need extra support, noting what they are doing well and what concrete next steps will lead to improvement.
  • In advance:

-   Read pages 17-19 of Flush and Noah's Point of View graphic organizer: pages 17-19 (answers, for teacher reference) to familiarize yourself with what students will be doing and the answers you will need to guide them toward (see supporting materials).

-   Review Plot Development: The Rising Action in Flush graphic organizer to familiarize yourself with what students will be doing in the Closing and Assessment (see supporting materials).

-   Review Mix and Mingle Checking for Understanding technique (see Appendix) and have music ready to use for the opening of this lesson.

  • Post: Learning targets; Thought, Word, Action symbols.

Vocabulary

rising action, snuffed (17), accustomed (18)

Materials

  • Equity sticks
  • Flush (book; distributed in Lesson 1; one per student)
  • Flush word-catcher (from Lesson 1)
  • Noah's Point of View graphic organizer: pages 17-19 (one per student)
  • Noah's Point of View graphic organizer: pages 17-19 (answers, for teacher reference)
  • Thought, Word, Action symbols (from Lesson 1)
  • Colored pencils or markers (blue and one other color; one of each color per student)
  • Flush Plot Development anchor chart (from Lesson 2)
  • Plot Development: The Rising Action in Flush anchor chart (new; co-created with students in Closing and Assessment)
  • Plot Development: The Rising Action in Flush anchor chart (answers, for teacher reference)
  • Structured notes (from Lesson 1; one new blank copy per student)
  • Evidence flags (at least three per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Chapters 2 and 3 of Flush (5 minutes)

  • Ask students to retrieve their structured notes homework and remind them of how Mix and Mingle works.
  • Mix and Mingle:
  1. Play music. Invite students to move around the room with their structured notes homework.
  2. After 15 seconds, stop the music.
  3. Invite students to share their answer to the following question with the person standing closest to them: "What happens in Chapter 2?"
  4. Repeat Steps 1 and 2.
  5. Invite students to share their answer to the following question with the person standing closest to them: "What happens in Chapter 3?"
  6. Repeat Steps 1 and 2.
  7. Invite students to share their answer to the following question with the person standing closes to them: "What is Noah's point of view of Jasper and how do you know?"
  • Refocus whole class and direct students to sit in their triads as they return to seats.
  • Opening the lesson by asking students to share their homework makes students accountable for completing it. It also gives you the opportunity to monitor which students have not been completing their homework.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Invite students to read the learning targets aloud with you:

*   "I can analyze how Carl Hiaasen develops Noah's point of view of Lice Peeking."

*   "I can determine the meaning of connotative and figurative language and analyze how the author's choice of words affects tone and meaning."

*   "I can analyze how Chapters 2 and 3 contribute to plot development."

  • Students should be familiar with these learning targets from previous lessons. Remind students of vocabulary they have explored in previous lessons: gist, connotative language, figurative language, tone, point of view, and plot.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Rereading Pages 17-19 (6 minutes)

  • Ask students to take out their copies of Flush. Invite two students to read the parts of Noah and Lice, and invite the rest of the class to read along silently in their heads from,"'Mr. Peeking?' I said. His real name was Charles," on page 17 to the end of page 19.
  • Ask students to take out their Flush word-catchers. As students have already read this section of Flush for homework and should have already recorded unfamiliar vocabulary on their word-catchers, invite them to work in triads to share any unfamiliar vocabulary words they found on pages 17-19, along with the definition. If they were unable to work out the definition from the context or find it in a dictionary, encourage other students to assist them with the definition.
  • Focus students on the word snuffed on page 17. Invite them to read the sentence around the word to see if they can work out what it means from the context. Ask:

*   "What word or words could you use in place of snuffed in this sentence?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses. Listen for students to explain that they could use the words "put out" or "extinguished" because that is what snuff means.
  • Focus students on the word accustomed on page 18. Again invite them to read the sentence around the word to see if they can work out what it means from the context. Ask:

*   "What word or words could you use in place of accustomed in this sentence?"

  • Consider using equity sticks to select students to share their responses. Listen for students to explain that they could use the words "used to" or "familiar with" because that is what accustomed means.
  • Remind students to record new words on their word-catchers.
  • Asking students to identify challenging vocabulary helps them to monitor their understanding of a complex text.
  • ELLs may be unfamiliar with more vocabulary words than are mentioned in this lesson. Check for comprehension of general words that most students would know.

B. Analyzing Point of View, Figurative Language, and Tone: Pages 17-19 (15 minutes)

  • Distribute Noah's Point of View graphic organizer: pages 17-19 and remind students that they filled out a similar organizer in Lesson 2 to analyze Noah's point of view of the Coral Queen and Dusty Muleman.
  • Invite students to read through the directions at the top of the organizer with you and encourage them to ask questions if they don't understand. Explain that they are to leave the final column empty for now, as they will consider word tone and meaning later in the lesson.
  • Circulate to assist students with analyzing the text for point of view, language, and tone. Refer to Noah's Point of View graphic organizer: pages 17-19 (answers, for teacher reference) to guide students. As you circulate, ask probing questions such as:

*   "What is Noah's point of view about Lice Peeking?"

*   "How do you know? Which specific words, phrases, and sentences from the text support your claim about Noah's point of view?"

  • Refocus whole class.
  • Remind students that Flush uses figurative language such as similes and metaphors to help us better understand how things look and what characters think and feel.
  • Invite the class to reread the figurative language learning target aloud with you:

*   "I can determine the meaning of connotative and figurative language and analyze how the author's choice of words affects tone and meaning."

  • Direct students to look back at the evidence they recorded in the middle column of their graphic organizers and ask them to discuss in triads:

*   "Can you identify any figurative language in the notes you have taken? Remember that figurative language is when you describe something by comparing it to something else."

  • Invite students to circle figurative language on their graphic organizers.
  • Use equity sticks to select students to share their responses. Listen for students to point out: "He looked like a sick iguana." If this isn't suggested, draw students' attention to it on page 19 and ask triads to discuss:

*   "So what kind of figurative language is this example? How do you know?"

  • Use equity sticks to call on students for their responses. Listen for them to explain that it is a simile, because similes often use "like" or "as" to compare two things.
  • Ask triads to discuss:

*   "Why does Hiaasen use figurative language here? What does it do for the reader?"

  • Listen for students to explain that it helps the reader create a mental picture of what Lice Peeking looked like and his character.
  • Focus students on the name "Lice." Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "What connotation does that name have?"

  • Select volunteers to share their responses. Listen for students to explain that it suggests something dirty that no one wants or likes because lice are generally associated with dirtiness and are never wanted.
  • Focus students on the phrase, "Lice Peeking propped himself against the wall of the trailer."
  • Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "What connotation does the word 'propped' have? What does it make you think?"

*   "What words could have been used instead with a different connotation?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses. Listen for students to explain that the word propped has the connotation that he was unable to stand and that the wall stopped him from falling over. "Leaned" could have been used instead, but that would suggest that instead of stopping him from falling over, the wall was just helping to relieve the weight on his feet.
  • Graphic organizers and recording forms engage students more actively and provide the necessary scaffolding that is especially critical for learners with lower levels of language proficiency and/or learning.
  • When reviewing graphic organizers or recording forms, consider using a document camera to display the document for students who struggle with auditory processing.

C. Determining Author's Techniques: Point of View, Tone, and Meaning (8 minutes)

  • Refer to the posted Thought, Word, Action symbols and remind students of the ways authors can develop point of view.
  • Tell students that now they are going to continue to work in triads to analyze how the author has developed point of view by looking at the evidence from the text recorded in the middle column of their Noah's Point of View graphic organizer: pages 17-19. Distribute colored pencils or markers and remind students to underline evidence as follows:

-   Noah's own thoughts, actions, and feelings--blue

-   The words and actions of others--another color

  • Remind students to then code each piece of evidence as a thought, word, or action.
  • Refocus whole group. Ask students:

*   "So what techniques does Hiaasen use most often to develop Noah's point of view of Lice Peeking in this excerpt?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses with the whole group. Listen for students to explain that in this excerpt, most of Noah's point of view comes from his own thoughts.
  • Invite students to focus on the Tone column of the graphic organizer. Ask triads to share the words they chose and to justify why they infer that tone.
  • Remind students that the tone helps to determine the point of view because it gives us an idea of what the narrator thinks of or feels about the subject.
  • Collect students' Noah's Point of View graphic organizers: pages 17-19 to check for understanding.
  • Asking students to color code and add symbols to their text provides a clear visual reference for analysis.
  • Collecting students' graphic organizers allows a quick check for understanding of the learning targets so that instruction can be adjusted or tailored to students' needs during the lesson or before the next lesson.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Analyzing Plot Development in Chapters 2 and 3 (9 minutes)

  • Ask a student to read aloud the learning target about plot:

*   "I can analyze how Chapters 2 and 3 contribute to plot development."

  • Display the Flush Plot Development anchor chart begun in Lesson 2.
  • Focus students on the words rising action along the left side diagonal line. Explain that the bulk of a novel is the rising action. Ask triads to discuss:

*   "What is rising action?"

  • Refocus whole class and listen for students to share something like: "It is how the action, tension, or conflicts grow or increase throughout the book."
  • Explain that something in each chapter is going to cause the action to rise or an increase in conflict or tension. It is like a drum solo building up to a really big and fast pattern. Tell students you want them to determine how Chapter 2 contributes to the rising action of the plot.
  • Display Plot Development: The Rising Action in Flush anchor chart and read aloud the headings in Row 1. Emphasize that in order to analyze the rising action, students first need to determine the main events in the chapters, determine how each event impacted the conflict or tension, and then explain how they know this. Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "What were the main events in Chapter 2?"

  • Select volunteers to share their answers with the whole group. Listen for and list each event in the second column. For suggested answers, see Plot Development: The Rising Action in Flush anchor chart (answers, for teacher reference).
  • Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "What were the main events in Chapter 3?"

  • Select volunteers to share their answers with the whole group. Listen for and list each event in the second column. For suggested answers, see Plot Development: The Rising Action in Flush anchor chart (answers, for teacher reference).
  • Explain that the events help to develop the plot by introducing new characters, information, conflicts, or tensions, or by adding one that has already been introduced. Ask students to discuss in their triads:

*   "How do the events in Chapter 2 contribute to the plot development? Do they provide/build on conflict or tension?"

  • Select volunteers to share their answers with the whole group. Listen for and list student responses in the final column. For suggested answers, see Plot Development: The Rising Action in Flush (answers, for teacher reference).
  • Ask students to discuss in their triads:

*   "How do the events in Chapter 3 contribute to the plot development? Do they provide/build on conflict or tension?"

  • Select volunteers to share their answers with the whole group. Listen for and list student responses in the final column. For suggested answers, see Plot Development: The Rising Action in Flush (answers, for teacher reference).
  • Ask students to synthesize information:

*   "So how did Chapters 2 and 3 contribute to the rising action of the plot in Flush?"

  • Refocus whole class and use equity sticks to call on a few triads to share their answer. On the Flush Plot Development anchor chart, recordnext to the Rising Action line something similar to: "Chapters 2 and 3 introduce: Lice, who might help; conflicts with Jasper; and tension between Noah's mom and dad."
  • Preview homework and distribute structured notes and evidence flags.
  • Graphic organizers and recording forms engage students more actively and provide the necessary scaffolding that is especially critical for learners with lower levels of language proficiency and/or learning
  • When reviewing graphic organizers or recording forms, consider using a document camera to display the document for students who struggle with auditory processing.

Homework

Homework
  • Read Chapters 4 and 5 of Flush. As you read, mark the text with at least three evidence flags to help you answer this focus question in your structured notes:

*   "What does Noah think about Miles Umlatt? How do you know?"

  • Record any new vocabulary on your word-catcher.

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