Analyzing Plot Development Across Flush | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M3B:U2:L12

Analyzing Plot Development Across Flush

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can analyze how a particular sentence, stanza, scene, or chapter fits in and contributes to the development of a literary text. (RL.6.5)

Supporting Targets

  • I can explain how Chapters 18-21 contribute to plot development.
  • I can explain how Carl Hiaasen develops the plot across the novel.
  • I can write a Reader's Review of the novel Flush.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Structured notes: end of Flush (from homework)
  • Reader's Review of Flush

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A.  Unpacking Learning Targets (3 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A.  Plot Development throughout the Novel (10 minutes)

B.  Reader's Review (17 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A.  Independent Reading Launch (15 minutes)

4.  Homework

A.  Read your independent reading book.

  • This is the final lesson of this unit. It has been included after the End of Unit 2 Assessment to ensure students have time to synthesize their learning about plot development in the novel Flush and to capture their thinking about the novel.
  • Independent reading is launched at the end of this lesson. See two separate stand-alone documents on EngageNY.org: The Importance of Increasing the Volume of Reading and Launching Independent Reading in Grades 6-8: Sample Plan--which together provide the rationale and practical guidance for a robust independent reading program. Having launched independent reading in Module 2, you may find students don't need as much time for the launch in this module; however, allocate time according to the needs of your particular students.
  • Students may require more time to finish reading the novel before this lesson.
  • Post: Learning targets.
  • Review: The Importance of Increasing the Volume of Reading and Launching Independent Reading in Grades 6-8: Sample Plan.

Vocabulary

None

Materials

  • Flush (book; distributed in Lesson 1; one per student)
  • Flush Plot Development anchor chart (from Lesson 2)
  • Reader's Review: Flush (one per student and one for display)
  • Launching Independent Reading in Grades 6-8: Sample Plan (for teacher reference; see Teaching Notes)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Unpacking Learning Targets (3 minutes)

  • Invite students to read aloud the learning targets with you:

*    "I can explain how Chapters 18-21 contribute to plot development."

*   "I can explain how Carl Hiaasen develops the plot across the novel."

*   "I can write a Reader's Review of the novel Flush."

  • Congratulate students on finishing the novel and on their good thinking on point of view, perspective, and plot development. Explain that in this lesson, they are going to finish up their work on the novel.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Plot Development throughout the Novel (10 minutes)

  • Invite students to refer to their structured notes and their novel, Flush, to share the answers they wrote to the homework focus question with their triads:

*   "What happened in the remaining chapters of Flush? How did that contribute to plot development?"

  • Point out the ideas recorded on the Rising Action section of the Flush Plot Development anchor chart and ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "What issues/problems were introduced throughout the story? How did each of them contribute to the plot?"

  • Select volunteers to share their responses. Listen for students to list the things from the Rising Action part of the anchor chart.
  • Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "How were those issues/problems resolved in the final chapters?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that the problem of the Coral Queen polluting the ocean was resolved when the food coloring made a purple river in the water from the Coral Queen out to sea, and the conflict between Noah and Jasper Jr. ended when Noah stood up to him and forced him to apologize.
  • Record the resolutions at the end of the line on the Flush Plot Development anchor chart.
  • Ask students to synthesize their learning about plot development in triads:

*   "So how did Carl Hiaasen develop the plot of Flush? What did he do?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that he introduced a big problem early on that needed to be resolved, and he added tensions associated with that problem along the way as characters tried to resolve the problem, including conflicts and tensions between characters.

B. Reader's Review (17 minutes)

  • Explain that now that students have finished the novel, they are going to write a Reader's Review of it to synthesize their thinking about it.
  • Display and distribute the Reader's Review. Invite students to read through the directions silently in their heads as you read it aloud.
  • Invite students to ask any clarifying questions.
  • Explain that because a Reader's Review contains opinions about a book, you would like them to complete this independently without talking to anyone else. Explain that you would like them to be honest about the book and to think carefully about their responses. Remind students that they need to justify their responses.
  • Circulate to support students as they work. Ask guiding questions:

*   "What happened?"

*   "What did you notice?"

*   "What did this book make you think about? Did you make any connections to other texts?"

*   "Why would you give it that star rating?"

  • Refocus the whole group. Invite students to share parts of their Reader's Reviews with the whole group.
  • Reading the instructions with students will ensure that all of them understand what is expected of them.
  • Consider inviting students who may struggle with putting their thoughts into writing to say them aloud to you before writing.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Independent Reading Launch (15 minutes)

  • Follow the Launching Independent Reading in Grades 6-8: Sample Plan for practical guidance in launching the independent reading program.

Homework

Homework
  • Read your independent reading book.

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