Analyzing Author’s Point of View: Chapter 4 of World without Fish | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M3B:U1:L8

Analyzing Author’s Point of View: Chapter 4 of World without Fish

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can determine an author's point of view or purpose in an informational text. (RI.6.6)
  • I can explain how an author's point of view is conveyed in an informational text. (RI.6.6)

Supporting Targets

  • I can analyze Mark Kurlansky's point of view in an excerpt of Chapter 4 of World without Fish.
  • I can explain how he conveys his point of view.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Structured notes for pages 52-61 (from homework)
  • Author's Point of View graphic organizer: pages 52-61
  • Analyzing Author's Point of View anchor chart

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A.  Feedback from Mid-Unit 1 Assessment (4 minutes)

B.  Unpacking Learning Targets (4 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A.  Think-Aloud: Analyzing Kurlansky's Point of View of Thomas Henry Huxley (10 minutes)

B.  Triad Work: Analyzing Kurlansky's Point of View of Thomas Henry Huxley (17 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A.  Partner and Whole Group Share (10 minutes)

4.  Homework

A.  Read "The Story of Kram and Ailat: Part 5" (the graphic novel) at the end of Chapter 4. Answer the focus question on your structured notes.

  • This is the second lesson of the two-lesson cycle begun in Lesson 7. Students analyze the same excerpt they read for the gist in the previous lesson: pages 52-61 of World without Fish. Now, students identify Kurlansky's point of view of Thomas Henry Huxley and how Kurlansky conveyed his point of view.
  • There is a think-aloud and an opportunity for the class to work through an example together before triads work independently, but some students still may need further modeling and guidance. Modify the lesson as needed according to your students' needs.
  • Working in triads to analyze Mark Kurlansky's point of view helps students gain confidence as they hear and discuss the ideas and thinking of others.
  • In advance:

-   Ensure the mid-unit 1 assessments are ready to return to students with feedback.

  • Review:

-   Author's Point of View: Pages 52-61 (answers, for teacher reference; see supporting materials). Note that these are just suggestions. Students may have additional ideas.

  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

point of view, convey, infer

Materials

  • Mid-Unit 1 Assessments with teacher feedback (completed in Lesson 6)
  • Equity sticks
  • World without Fish word-catchers (from Lesson 1)
  • Author's Point of View graphic organizer: pages 52-61 (one per student, one for display)
  • Author's Point of View graphic organizer: pages 52-61 (answers, for teacher reference)
  • Highlighters (any color; one per student and one for the teacher)
  • World without Fish (book; distributed in Lesson 1; one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Feedback from Mid-Unit 1 Assessment (4 minutes)

  • Hand back the Mid-Unit 1 Assessments with teacher feedback and invite students to spend time reading your feedback.
  • Invite students to write their name on the board if they have questions so you can follow up either immediately or later in the lesson.
  • Name some patterns you noticed in students' work, particularly things the class did well.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (4 minutes)

  • Invite students to read the learning targets aloud with you:

*   "I can analyze Mark Kurlansky's point of view in an excerpt of Chapter 4 of World without Fish."

*   "I can explain how he conveys his point of view."

  • Focus students on point of view. Ask triads to discuss:

*   "What does 'point of view' mean? Consider using equity sticks to select students to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that people have different ways of looking at things, and a person's point of view is his or her way of looking at things.

  • Tell students that in literature, every story is told from a point of view. It can be a first-person point of view, where the narrator is the "I" or "me" telling the story; a third-person limited point of view, in which an author appears to know the thoughts and feelings of just one of the characters in a story, or a third-person omniscient point of view, in which an author captures the points of view of all the characters.
  • Ask triads to discuss:

*   "What do you think 'convey' means?"

  • Select volunteers to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that convey means communicates.
  • Direct students to add "point of view" and convey to their World without Fish word-catchers.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.
  • Discussing and clarifying the language of learning targets helps build academic vocabulary.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Think-Aloud: Analyzing Kurlansky's Point of View of Thomas Henry Huxley (10 minutes)

  • Remind students that for homework they analyzed what Mark Kurlansky thinks of Thomas Henry Huxley's ideas and the things he did in the late nineteenth century. Invite students to share their thinking from their structured notes homework with their triads.
  • Display and distribute the Author's Point of View graphic organizer: pages 52-61 and highlighters and ask students to take out their World without Fish books. Invite students to read the column headings aloud with you. Ask:

*   "What do you notice?"

*   "What do you wonder?"

  • Cold call students to share their ideas with the whole group.
  • Explain to students that you will model how to analyze this text for Kurlansky's point of view. First you will do a think-aloud, and then students will have time to practice as triads. Direct students to follow along and listen closely to your thought process, or how you analyze for point of view.
  • The following is an example of a possible think-aloud with the first couple of paragraphs on page 56:

-   "My first step is to scan the excerpt of World without Fish for where Kurlansky begins to talk about Huxley. I can see he starts talking about Huxley on page 56, so I'm going to read the first paragraph. Straight away from the first paragraph I know that Kurlansky thinks Huxley was influential and played an important role in helping people to accept Charles Darwin's ideas, so I'm going to record that in the first column of my graphic organizer."

  • Record in the first column of the displayed organizer. Refer to the Author's Point of View graphic organizer: pages 52-61 (answers, for teacher reference) for guidance. Continue the think-aloud:

-   "In the middle column I need to support my claim about his point of view with evidence from the text, or quotes."

  • Record in the middle column of the displayed organizer. Refer to the Author's Point of View graphic organizer: pages 52-61 (answers, for teacher reference) for guidance. Continue the think-aloud:

-   "The final column asks how Mark Kurlansky conveyed his point of view. The first direction asks me to highlight text clues. The words 'influential' and 'important role' are the parts of the paragraph that showed me his point of view. I'm going to use a highlighter to highlight those."

  • Highlight those words on the displayed organizer. Refer to the Author's Point of View graphic organizer: pages 52-61 (answers, for teacher reference) for guidance. Continue the think-aloud:

-   "The second instruction in the final column asks whether the words I have highlighted told me his point of view directly, or whether they led me to infer it. What does 'infer' mean?"

  • Select students to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that infer means to use clues in evidence to make a claim.
  • Point out that by using the words "influential" and "important role," Kurlansky tells us directly. Record this in the final column of the graphic organizer. Refer to the Author's Point of View graphic organizer: pages 52-61 (answers, for teacher reference) for guidance. Continue the think-aloud:

-   "Now I'm going to move on to the next section of text, these words in bold, colored font."

  • Reread the words in bold, colored font on page 56 aloud. Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "What does this change in font tell you? What do the large, capital letters and the colors suggest?"

  •  Cold call students to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that it suggests he wants to emphasize this information because it is particularly important in this chapter, that the capital letters suggest shock/disbelief, and that he is angry, as suggested by the use of the color red. Point out that often using all capital letters in a text is perceived as "shouting."
  • Record a claim in the first column of the displayed graphic organizer. Refer to the Author's Point of View graphic organizer: pages 52-61 (answers, for teacher reference) for guidance.
  • Record the text evidence in the second column.
  • Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "In addition to the use of different sized and colored font, which words suggest the author's point of view?"

  • Select volunteers to share their responses. Listen for them to suggest that the word "completely" in front of misunderstood really emphasizes the word, which makes him seem shocked or angry. Highlight those words in the middle column of the displayed organizer.
  • Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "Does he tell us directly that he is angry or shocked? Or do we use clues to infer it from the text? If so, how?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that we infer it from the large capital letters and the use of red font.
  • Providing models of expected work supports all learners, but especially supports challenged learners.
  • When reviewing graphic organizers or recording forms, consider using a document camera to display the document for students who struggle with auditory processing.

B. Triad Work: Analyzing Kurlansky's Point of View of Thomas Henry Huxley (17 minutes)

  • Invite students to engage with their triads in the same process you just modeled for the rest of the chapter. Remind students to take it paragraph by paragraph and explain that some paragraphs may not contain evidence of Mark Kurlansky's point of view, but they should discuss it as a triad before moving on to the next paragraph.
  • Circulate to support triads as they work. Ask questions and refer to the Author's Point of View graphic organizer: pages 52-61 (answers, for teacher reference) as needed to guide students. Ask:

*   "What words or text features led you to make that claim about his point of view?"

  • Invite triads you think may struggle with this to focus on just pages 56 and 57.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Partner and Whole Group Share (10 minutes)

  • Invite students to pair up with someone from another triad to share their answers and to make revisions/additions as they see fit (e.g., if their partner has a different idea that didn't come up in their own triad).
  • Select volunteers to share their ideas with the whole group. Invite students to make revisions/additions based on the whole group discussion as they see fit. Refer to the Author's Point of View graphic organizer: pages 52-61 (answers, for teacher reference) for guidance.

Homework

Homework
  • Read "The Story of Kram and Ailat: Part 5" (the graphic novel) at the end of Chapter 4. Answer this focus question on your structured notes in your journal:

-   "What do we learn about fishing from the graphic novel? How does Mark Kurlansky illustrate and elaborate on the idea of fish depletion here?"

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