Reading for Gist and Answering Text-Dependent Questions: Chapter 4 of World without Fish | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M3B:U1:L7

Reading for Gist and Answering Text-Dependent Questions: Chapter 4 of World without Fish

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can determine an author's point of view or purpose in an informational text. (RI.6.6)
  • I can explain how an author's point of view is conveyed in an informational text. (RI.6.6)
  • I can use a variety of strategies to determine word meaning in informational texts. (RI.6.4)

Supporting Targets

  • I can find the gist of an excerpt of Chapter 4 of World without Fish.
  • I can determine the meaning of unfamiliar words and phrases in an excerpt of Chapter 4.
  • I can use evidence from the text to answer text-dependent questions.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Structured notes for "The Story of Kram and Ailat: Part 4" (from homework)
  • Text-Dependent Questions: Pages 52-61

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A.  Engaging the Reader: Graphic Novel Part 4 (6 minutes)

B.  Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A.  Finding the Gist: Pages 52-61 (17 minutes)

B.  Text-Dependent Questions: Pages 52-61 (15 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A.  Tracing the Development of an Idea (5 minutes)

4.  Homework

A.  Reread the excerpt of Chapter 4 that you read in class today. Use evidence flags to help you gather evidence to answer this focus question on your structured notes:

*   "What does Mark Kurlansky think about Thomas Henry Huxley's ideas and the things he did in the late 19th century? Does he agree with him? Does he disagree with him? How do you know?"

  • This lesson begins a two-lesson cycle during which students analyze Kurlansky's point of view (RI.6.6). The structure is similar to the lessons in the first part of this unit. The focus of this lesson is to help students dig deep into Chapter 4 by reading for the gist and answering text-dependent questions to gain a deeper understanding of the text and prepare to analyze point of view in the next lesson.
  • Be prepared to return the Mid-Unit 1 Assessment with teacher feedback to students in Lesson 8.
  • Review:

-   Chapter 4 of World without Fish.

-   Text-Dependent Questions: Pages 52-61 (answers, for teacher reference; see supporting materials).

-   Mix and Mingle protocol.

  • Post: Learning targets; Graphic Novel: Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart; Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart.

Vocabulary

point of view, myth, bounty (51), misconception, indestructible, Darwinism (53), posthumously (54), refuted (55), influential, promoting, anatomy, staunch (56), commissions (57), class, unobservant, avocations, contempt, preservation (57), interfering, objecting, Industrial Revolution, diminution (58), exhaustion, scarce (59)

Materials

  • Graphic Novel: Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart (begun in Lesson 4)
  • Graphic Novel: Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart (answers, for teacher reference)
  • World without Fish (book; distributed in Lesson 1; one per student)
  • Sticky notes (eight per student)
  • Dictionaries (at least one per triad)
  • World without Fish word-catchers (from Lesson 1)
  • Text-Dependent Questions: Pages 52-61 (one per student, one for display)
  • Text-Dependent Questions: Pages 52-61 (answers, for teacher reference)
  • Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2)
  • Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart (answers, for teacher reference)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Graphic Novel Part 4 (6 minutes)

  • Remind students of the of the homework focus question: "What do we learn about fishing from the graphic novel? How does Mark Kurlansky illustrate and elaborate on the idea of fish depletion here?"
  • Mix and Mingle:

-   Play music.

-   Invite students to move around the room with their structured notes.

-   Stop the music after 15 seconds.

-   Invite students to share their responses with the person standing closest to them.

-   Repeat two more time.

  • Select volunteers to share their responses with the whole group. Listen for students to explain that he illustrates and elaborates on the idea by addressing it directly. Kram is interviewed about fish depletion on a talk show and while the presenter listens to some of what he says, he doesn't take it seriously. Instead he is mocked for a prediction he made previously.
  • Record students' ideas on the posted Graphic Novel: Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart. See the Graphic Novel: Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart (answers, for teacher reference) as a guide.
  • Opening the lesson by asking students to share their homework makes them accountable for completing it. It also gives you the opportunity to monitor which students are not doing their homework.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Invite students to read the learning targets aloud with you:

*   "I can find the gist of an excerpt of Chapter 4 of World without Fish."

*   "I can determine the meaning of unfamiliar words and phrases in an excerpt of Chapter 4."

*   "I can use evidence from the text to answer text-dependent questions."

  • Ask triads to briefly turn and talk:

*   "What are we going to be doing today? Why?"

  • Cold call on a student and listen for: "We are reading a new excerpt of World without Fish for the gist and answering text-dependent questions in order to gain a deeper understanding of the text."
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that help all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.
  • Discussing and clarifying the language of learning targets helps build academic vocabulary.

Work Time

Work Time

A. Finding the Gist: Pages 52-61 (17 minutes)

  • Invite students to take out World without Fish and turn to page 51, which is the first page of Chapter 4. Invite students to read along silently as you read the page aloud. Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "What is a myth?"

  • Select volunteers to share their answers. Remind students of the work they did on myths in Module 1. Emphasize here that myth has two meanings. It can be a traditional story explaining something, or it can be a false belief or idea.
  • Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "What is a bounty?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that a bounty is a good thing that is given in large amounts.
  • Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "So what do you think the text means by 'the myth of nature's bounty'?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses. Listen for and guide students to understand that it means the false idea that nature is going to keep giving in large amounts.
  • Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "What is this chapter going to be about? How do you know?"

  • Select volunteers to share their ideas with the whole group. Listen for students to explain that it is going to be about how people, including scientists, have falsely believed for a long time that nature is going to keep giving and giving.
  • Remind students that good readers read complex texts multiple times to make sure they understand what is being written. Invite students to listen for the flow of the book and to follow along closely as you read the chapter aloud to the end of page 61.
  • Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "What is this chapter mostly about?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that it is mostly about how a scientist, Huxley, said that you can't overfish species. Many governments believed him and didn't control their fishing practices. Eventually, Huxley realized he was wrong.
  • Invite a student to reread the first two learning targets aloud.

*   "I can find the gist of an excerpt of Chapter 4 of World without Fish."

*   "I can determine the meaning of unfamiliar words and phrases in an excerpt of Chapter 4."

  • Distribute eight sticky notes to each student. Remind students of the importance of summarizing smaller chunks of text as they read for the gist, and ask them to annotate the gist on sticky notes. Remind students to ask questions as they read to help them monitor comprehension. Explain that the goal is for them to understand the basic idea of this excerpt.
  • Distribute dictionaries to each triad. Remind students that where possible, you would like them to read around unfamiliar words, looking for context clues to figure out what they mean; however, if they can't figure out the meaning from the context, encourage them to look the word up. If they aren't sure what the word means after looking for context clues and looking in the dictionary, they should leave the definition blank to be discussed with the whole group later.
  • Invite students to work together as a triad to read for the gist, annotate sticky notes, and record unfamiliar words on their World without Fish  word-catchers as they reread pages 52-61 of Chapter 4.
  • Circulate and support students as they read. For those who need more support, ask them to practice telling you the gist of a section before they write it on a sticky note.
  • As students finish up, refocus whole group. Focus students on the word indestructible on page 53. Ask them to discuss in triads:

*   "If something is destructible, what does that mean?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that it means it can be destroyed.
  • Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "So what does the 'in' prefix do to the word? How does it change the meaning?"

  • Select volunteers to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that it makes the word have the opposite meaning. So instead of something that can be destroyed, "indestructible" means something that cannot be destroyed.
  • Focus students on the word Darwinism on page 53. Remind students that they read about the ideas of Charles Darwin in Lesson 2 and that Darwinism means the ideas of Charles Darwin.
  • Invite students to share any unfamiliar vocabulary words they found, along with the definition. If they were unable to work out the definition from the context or find it in a dictionary, encourage other students to assist them with the definition. To keep things moving, if no one else knows what the word means, define the word for the class.
  • Students may struggle with these words, so be sure to address them here: posthumouslyrefutedinfluential, promotinganatomy, staunch, commissionsclassunobservantavocationscontempt, preservation, interfering, objectingIndustrial Revolution, diminution, exhaustion, and scarce.
  • If students are unable to work out the definition from the context or find it in a dictionary, encourage other students to assist them with the definition. To keep things moving, if no one else knows what the word means, define the word for the class.
  • Remind students to record new words on their word-catchers.

B. Text-Dependent Questions: Pages 52-61 (15 minutes)

  • Display and distribute Text-Dependent Questions: Pages 52-61. Remind students that the purpose of this is to dig deeper into the text to understand what Mark Kurlansky is saying.
  • Invite students to read along with you as you read the learning target at the top of the handout and the questions in the first column aloud.
  • Invite triads to work together to reread the text-dependent questions in Column 1, review the excerpt of text, and discuss possible answers before recording their answers in Column 2 using evidence from the text.
  • Circulate and observe triads. Support students as needed by asking them to use only evidence from the excerpt to answer the questions. Refer to Text-Dependent Questions: Pages 52-61 (answers, for teacher reference) as needed..

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Tracing the Development of an Idea (5 minutes)

  • Focus students' attention on the posted Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart.  Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "How does Kurlansky illustrate and elaborate on the idea of fish depletion in the excerpt you have read today?"

  • Select volunteers to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that the author illustrates and elaborates on the idea by going back in history to explain why and how overfishing began, even though there were some warning signs.
  • Record this on the Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart. See Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart (answers, for teacher reference) for guidance.
  • Capturing student ideas on an anchor chart can ensure easy reference later and can enable students to see at a glance how an idea has developed through a text.

Homework

Homework
  • Reread the excerpt of Chapter 4 that you read in class today. Use evidence flags to help you gather evidence to answer this focus question on your structured notes in your journal:

-   "What does Mark Kurlansky think about Thomas Henry Huxley's ideas and the things he did in the late 19th century? Does he agree with him? Does he disagree with him? How do you know?"

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