Tracing the Idea of Fish Depletion: Chapter 2 | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M3B:U1:L5

Tracing the Idea of Fish Depletion: Chapter 2

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can determine the main idea of an informational text based on details in the text. (RI.6.2)
  • I can analyze how key individuals, events, or ideas are developed throughout a text. (RI.6.3)
  • I can use a variety of strategies to determine word meaning in informational texts. (RI.6.4)

Supporting Targets

  • I can find the gist of pages 28-33 of World without Fish.
  • I can use strategies to determine the meaning of words and phrases in an excerpt of Chapter 2 of World without Fish.
  • I can use evidence from the text to answer text-dependent questions.
  • I can analyze how Mark Kurlansky illustrates/elaborates on the problem of fish depletion in an excerpt of Chapter 2 of World without Fish.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Structured notes for "The Story of Kram and Ailat: Part 2" (from homework)
  • Text-Dependent Questions: Pages 28-33

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A.  Engaging the Reader: Graphic Novel Part 2 (6 minutes)

B.  Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A.  Reading for Gist: Pages 28-33 (16 minutes)

B.  Text-Dependent Questions: Pages 28-33 (15 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A.  Tracing the Development of an Idea (6 minutes)

4.  Homework

A.  Reread the excerpt of Chapter 2 that you read in class today.

B.  Read "The Story of Kram and Ailat: Part 3" (the graphic novel) at the end of Chapter 2. Answer the focus question on your structured notes.

  • This lesson is similar in structure to Lessons 1-4. Students read a new excerpt of World without Fish for the gist and then answer text-dependent questions to dig deeper into the text and analyze how Mark Kurlansky illustrates and elaborates on the idea of fish depletion in Chapter 2.
  • In advance:

-   Read World without Fish Chapter 2, pages 28-33.

-   Review Text-Dependent Questions: Pages 28-33 (see supporting materials).

  • Post: Learning targets; Graphic Novel: Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart; Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart.

Vocabulary

industry, productive, sail power, innovations, fishing territories (28), beam trawler (29), efficient, advantages, well boats (30), technological (31), teeming, boon, lucrative (32)

Materials

  • Graphic Novel: Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart (begun in Lesson 4)
  • Graphic Novel: Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart (answers, for teacher reference)
  • World without Fish (book; distributed in Lesson 1; one per student)
  • Sticky notes (eight per student)
  • Dictionaries (at least one per triad)
  • World without Fish word-catchers (students' own; from Lesson 1)
  • Text-Dependent Questions: Pages 28-33 (one per student, one for display)
  • Text-Dependent Questions: Pages 28-33 (answers, for teacher reference)
  • Exit Ticket: Tracing the Development of an Idea, Chapter 2 (one per student)
  • Exit Ticket: Tracing the Development of an Idea, Chapter 2 (answers, for teacher reference)
  • Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Graphic Novel Part 2 (6 minutes)

  • Remind students of the of the homework focus question: "What do we learn about fishing from the graphic novel? How does Mark Kurlansky illustrate and elaborate on the idea of fish depletion here?"
  • Tell students they are going to start with Mix and Mingle protocol:

1.         Play music. Invite students to move around the room with their structured notes homework.

2.         After 15 seconds, stop the music.

3.         Ask students to share their answer to the focus question with the person standing closest to them.

4.         Repeat until students have spoken to at least two people.

  • Select volunteers to share their responses with the whole group. Listen for students to explain that we learn that fishing with nets catches a lot of fish and that the fishermen throw back the dead fish when they catch more than they are legally allowed to. Listen for students to also explain that the author illustrates and elaborates on the idea of fish depletion by introducing a way of fishing that is causing fish depletion and a loophole related to regulating how much fish fishermen can catch.
  • Record students' ideas on the posted Graphic Novel: Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart. See the Graphic Novel: Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart (answers, for teacher reference) for a guide.
  • Reviewing homework holds all students accountable for reading the text and completing their homework.
  • Capturing students' ideas on an anchor chart can ensure easy reference later and can enable students to see how an idea has developed through a text at a glance.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Ask for a volunteer to read the learning targets aloud.

*   "I can find the gist of pages 28-32 of World without Fish."

*   "I can use strategies to determine the meaning of words and phrases in an excerpt of Chapter 2 of World without Fish."

*   "I can use evidence from the text to answer text-dependent questions."

*   "I can analyze how Mark Kurlansky illustrates/elaborates on the problem of fish depletion in an excerpt of Chapter 2 of World without Fish."

  • Point out to students that these are the same learning targets they have encountered in previous lessons.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reading for Gist: Pages 28-33 (16 minutes)

  • Invite students to take out World without Fish and turn to page 21, which is the first page of Chapter 2. Invite students to read along in their heads as you read the page aloud. Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "What is this chapter going to be about? How do you know?"

  • Select volunteers to share their ideas with the whole group. Listen for students to explain that it is going to be about how humans began to fish and how fishing became an industry.
  • Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "What does it mean by 'fishing became an industry'? Think back to what you found out about the Industrial Revolution earlier in the unit."

  • Select volunteers to share their responses. Listen for and guide students to understand that it means how fishing went from being a man on a small boat with a fishing rod to being huge boats with lots of motorized equipment to catch fish.
  • Tell students to turn to page 28 of Chapter 2.
  • Invite students to silently read along as you read aloud from "It was in the North Sea ..." on page 28 up to "... they simply moved on to new ones" on page 33. Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "What is this excerpt mostly about?"

  • Select volunteers to share their responses. Listen for students to explain that it is mostly about how the fishing industry began to change because technology was developed, such as steam-powered boats and rails to deliver fresh fish in the late 19th century.
  • Invite a student to reread the learning target about reading for the gist aloud.

*   "I can find the gist of pages 28-33 of World without Fish."

  • Distribute eight sticky notes to each student. Remind students of the importance of summarizing smaller chunks of text as they read for the gist, and ask them to annotate the gist on the sticky notes. Remind students to ask questions as they read to help them monitor comprehension. Explain that the goal is for them to understand what this excerpt is mostly about. Remind students that where possible, you would like them to use their word strategies to figure out the meaning of unfamiliar words: reading around unfamiliar words, looking for root words, replacing the word with other words that would make sense, and looking for context clues to figure out what they mean. Distribute dictionaries to each triad. If students can't figure out the meaning from the context, encourage them to look the word up. If they aren't sure what the word means after looking for context clues and looking in the dictionary, students should leave the definition to be discussed with the whole group later.
  • Invite students to work together as a triad to read for the gist, annotate sticky notes, and record unfamiliar words on their World without Fish word-catchers.
  • Circulate and support students as they read. For those who need more support, ask them to practice telling you the gist of a section before they write it on a sticky note.
  • As students finish up, refocus the whole group. Invite students to share any unfamiliar vocabulary words they found, along with the definition. If they were unable to work out the definition from the context or find it in a dictionary, encourage other students to assist them with the definition. To keep things moving, if no one else knows what the word means, define the word for the class.
  • Students may struggle with these words, so be sure to address them here: productive, sail power, innovations, fishing territoriesbeam trawler, efficient, advantageswell boatstechnological, boonteeming, and lucrative.
  • If students are unable to work out the definition from the context or find it in a dictionary, encourage other students to assist them with the definition. To keep things moving, if no one else knows what the word means, define the word for the class.
  • Remind students to record new words on their word-catchers.
  • Allow students to grapple with a complex text before explicit teaching of vocabulary. After students have read for the gist, they can identify challenging vocabulary for themselves.

B. Text-Dependent Questions: Pages 28-33 (15 minutes)

  • Display and distribute Text-Dependent Questions: Pages 28-33. Remind students that the purpose of this is to dig deeper into the text to understand what Mark Kurlansky is saying.
  • Invite students to read along with you as you read aloud the learning target at the top of the handout and the questions in the first column.
  • Invite triads to work together to reread the text-dependent questions in Column 1, review the excerpt of text, and discuss possible answers before recording their answers to the questions in Column 2, using evidence from the text.
  • Circulate and observe triads working. Support students as needed by asking them to use only evidence from the excerpt to answer the questions. Refer to the Text-Dependent Questions: Pages 28-33 (answers, for teacher reference) as needed..
  • Asking students to discuss challenging questions before recording them helps to ensure that all students have an idea about what to write and can give students confidence in their responses.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Tracing the Development of an Idea (6 minutes)

  • Distribute the Exit Ticket: Tracing the Development of an Idea, Chapter 2. Explain to students that previously they have answered this question as a whole group on the Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart, but in this lesson they are going to fill out an exit ticket instead because in the next lesson they are going to be doing their mid-unit assessment, in which they will be filling out a chart like this independently.
  • Focus students on the Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart.Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "What is the idea we are tracing here?"

  • Select students to share their responses. Listen for students to explain that the idea is fish depletion.
  • Ask students to independently record on their exit tickets the answer to this question:

*   "How does the author illustrate and elaborate on this idea in the excerpt you have read from Chapter 2?"

  • Remind students that illustrate and elaborate mean to add detail and develop the idea.
  • Collect in the exit tickets to check that all students are on the right track with filling out this chart independently.
  • Capturing students' ideas on an anchor chart can ensure easy reference later and can enable students to see at a glance how an idea has developed through a text.

Homework

Homework
  • Reread the excerpt of Chapter 2 that you read in class today.
  • Read "The Story of Kram and Ailat: Part 3" (the graphic novel) at the end of Chapter 2. Answer this focus question on your structured notes in your journal:

-   "What do we learn about fishing from the graphic novel? How does Mark Kurlansky illustrate and elaborate on the idea of fish depletion here?"

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