Introducing the Struggle for Survival in the Introduction of World Without Fish | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M3B:U1:L3

Introducing the Struggle for Survival in the Introduction of World Without Fish

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can determine the main idea of an informational text based on details in the text. (RI.6.2)
  • I can analyze how key individuals, events, or ideas are developed throughout a text. (RI.6.3)
  • I can use a variety of strategies to determine word meaning in informational texts. (RI.6.4)

Supporting Targets

  • I can find the gist of an excerpt of the Introduction of World without Fish.
  • I can use strategies to determine the meaning of words and phrases in this excerpt of the Introduction of World without Fish.
  • I can use evidence from the text to answer text-dependent questions.
  • I can analyze how Mark Kurlansky introduces the problem of fish depletion in World without Fish.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Structured notes for pages xii-xvii (from homework)
  • Text-Dependent Questions: Pages xx-xxiii

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A.  Engaging the Reader: Excerpt 2 of the Introduction (6 minutes)

B.  Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A.  Reading for Gist: Pages xx-xxiii (15 minutes)

B.  Text-Dependent Questions: Pages xx-xxiii (16 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A.  Discussion: Analyzing the Introduction (6 minutes)

4.  Homework

A.  Reread the excerpt of the Introduction that you read in class today.

B.  Read "The Story of Kram and Ailat: Part 1" (the graphic novel) at the end of the Introduction of World without Fish. Answer the focus question on your structured notes.

  • In this lesson, students continue to discuss and analyze the Introduction of World without Fish. The priority this lesson is that students become familiar with the routine of reading for the gist, answering text-dependent questions, and analyzing their reading to understand how Kurlansky develops his message about fish depletion throughout the text. Students will follow this routine for Chapters 1-3, including the mid-unit assessment.
  • Due to time restraints, students do not closely read all of the introduction. Instead, the excerpts containing the most relevant information have been selected for students to read. In this lesson they skip ahead a couple of pages from the last excerpt they read. You may want to explain this to students and invite them to read those pages in their own time if they desire.
  • The Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart will continue to be used to capture and structure students' thinking about their homework focus questions and class reading and discussion.
  • A close reading guide is not used to guide students through this excerpt because it isn't necessary for students to be able to answer the text-dependent questions. This also creates variety so that each lesson isn't exactly the same.
  • Students will follow the same system for homework begun in Lesson 1: Post or display the homework focus question at the conclusion of the lesson and instruct students to copy it down. You may prefer to have students copy the question into a journal rather than use the structured notes handout.
  • In advance:

-   Review pages xx-xxiii of the Introduction of World without Fish and the Text-Dependent Questions: Pages xx-xxiii (answers, for teacher reference).

-   Review Concentric Circles protocol (see Appendix).

  • Post: Learning targets; Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart.

Vocabulary

fish depletion, ecosystem, aquatic species, polyp, reproduce, colony, organism, culprit (xx), extinct, trawler, coined, biodiversity (xxii), inhabit, unprecedented, decline (xxiii)

Materials

  • Structured notes (completed for homework)
  • Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart (one for display; begun in Lesson 2)
  • Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart (answers, for teacher reference)
  • World without Fish (book; distributed in Lesson 1; one per student)
  • Sticky notes (eight per student)
  • Dictionaries (at least one per triad)
  • World without Fish word-catchers (students' own; from Lesson 1)
  • Text Dependent Questions: Pages xx-xxiii (one per student, one for display)
  • Text Dependent Questions: Pages xv-xxiii (answers, for teacher reference)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Excerpt 2 of the Introduction (6 minutes)

  • Concentric Circles Protocol:

-   Divide the group in half and invite both halves to get into two circles, one inside the other with their structured notes. The circle on the inside should be facing out and the circle on the outside should be facing in.

-   Remind students of the of the homework focus question: "How does Mark Kurlansky continue to introduce his ideas about fish depletion in the first few pages of World without Fish?"

-   Invite students to refer to their structured notes from their homework.

-   Invite students in the inside circle to share their responses with the person opposite them in the outside circle.

-   Invite students in the outside circle to do the same.

-   Invite students in the inside circle to move two people to the left.

-   Repeat steps.

  • Circulate and listen for students to explain that Kurlansky introduces his ideas by telling us what is going to happen to the planet if things don't change.
  • Refocus whole class and refer to the posted Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart.
  • Cold call students to share their responses. Listen for and guide students to understand that Mark Kurlansky continues to introduce his ideas about fish depletion by introducing very famous scientific ideas--like evolution and diversity of species by Charles Darwin--that provide a background to build his ideas on.
  • Record this on the Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart. See Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart (answers, for teacher reference) for a model.
  • Reviewing homework holds all students accountable for reading the text and completing their homework.
  • Capturing students' ideas on an anchor chart can ensure easy reference later and can enable students to see at a glance how an idea has developed through a text.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Invite students to follow along as you read the learning targets aloud:

*   "I can find the gist of an excerpt of the Introduction of World without Fish."

*   "I can use strategies to determine the meaning of words and phrases in this excerpt of the Introduction of World without Fish."

*   "I can use evidence from the text to answer text-dependent questions."

*   "I can analyze how Mark Kurlansky introduces the problem of fish depletion in World without Fish."

  • Remind students that they were introduced to these learning targets in the previous lessons and that this lesson will be much like the previous two in that they will read a new excerpt of the Introduction for the gist and then answer text-dependent questions in order to dig deeper into the text.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reading for Gist: Pages xx-xxiii (15 minutes)

  • Invite students to turn to page xx of the Introduction of World without Fish. Invite students to silently read along as you read aloud pages xx-xxiii.
  • Read aloud the learning target:

*   "I can find the gist of an excerpt of the Introduction of World without Fish."

  • Distribute eight sticky notes to each student. Remind students that the goal is for them to understand what the text is mostly about and that this is a challenging text, so they need to be prepared to use their reading stamina and to persevere, breaking the text into pieces (e.g., paragraphs) and working out the gist one piece at a time. Remind students to discuss the gist in triads before recording anything on their sticky notes.
  • Remind students of the strategies they have practiced for determining the meaning of unknown vocabulary: reading around the word, replacing the word with one that fits, identifying the root word, using the dictionary, etc. Distribute dictionaries to each triad. Explain that if students still aren't sure what the word means after using the strategies, they should leave the definition to be discussed with the whole group later. Remind students to record unfamiliar vocabulary on their World without Fish word-catchers.
  • Remind students to begin at the top of page xx and stop at the end of page xxiii.
  • Circulate and support students as they read. For those who need more support, ask them to practice telling you the gist of a section before they write it on a sticky note.
  • As students finish up, refocus whole group. Focus students on the word ecosystem on page xx. Tell students that the prefix "eco" means "the relationship between living things." Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "So what do you think an 'ecosystem' might be?"

  • Select volunteers to share their responses. Listen for and guide students to understand that an ecosystem is a group of living things that live in an area.
  • Focus students on the words aquatic species on page xx. Ask:

*   "What does the root of this word, 'aqua,' mean?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses. Listen for students to explain that it means water.
  • Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "What do you think 'aquatic species' means?"

  • Select volunteers to share their responses. Listen for students to explain that it means species that live in the water.
  • Focus students on the word culprit on page xx. Ask:

*   "Read around the word 'culprit.' What do you think it means? What words would you replace it with?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses. Listen for and guide students to understand that it means "those responsible."
  • Focus students on the word biodiversity on page xxii. Remind students that bio means life.
  • Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "What does 'diversity' mean?"

  • Select students to share their responses. Listen for students to explain that diversity means variety.
  • Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "So what does 'biodiversity' mean?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses. Listen for students to explain that it means variety in life.
  • Invite students to share any other unfamiliar vocabulary words they found, along with the definition. If they were unable to work out the definition from the context or find it in a dictionary, encourage other students to assist them with the definition. To keep things moving, if no one else knows what the word means, define the word for the class.
  • Students may struggle with these words, so be sure to address them here: polyp, colony, reproduce, organismextincttrawlercoined, inhabitunprecedented, and decline. 
  • If students are unable to work out the definition from the context or find it in a dictionary, encourage other students to assist with the definition. To keep things moving, if no one else knows what the word means, define the word for the class.
  • Hearing a complex text read slowly, fluently, and without interruption or explanation promotes fluency for students. They are hearing a strong reader read the text aloud with accuracy and expression and are simultaneously looking at and thinking about the words on the printed page. Be sure to set clear expectations that students read along silently in their heads as you read the text aloud.
  • Allow students to grapple with a complex text before explicit teaching of vocabulary. After students have read for the gist, they can identify challenging vocabulary for themselves.

B. Text-Dependent Questions: Pages xx-xxiii (16 minutes)

  • Display and distribute the Text-Dependent Questions: Pages xx-xxiii. Remind students that the purpose of this is to dig deeper into the text to understand what Mark Kurlansky is saying.
  • Invite students to follow along silently as you read aloud the learning target at the top of the handout and the questions in the first column.
  • Invite triads to work together to reread the text-dependent questions in Column 1, then review the text excerpt and discuss possible answers before recording their answers to the questions in Column 2 using evidence from the text.
  • Circulate and observe triads working. Support students as needed by asking them to use only evidence from the excerpt to answer the questions. For answers, refer to the Text-Dependent Questions: Pages xx-xxiii (answers, for teacher reference).
  • As students finish up, refocus whole class. Cold call students you missed while circulating to check the understanding of the whole class. Guide students through each question and the responses to the focus question, again using Text-Dependent Questions: Pages xx-xxiii (answers, for teacher reference).
  • Invite students to make revisions to their responses as necessary.
  • Asking students to discuss challenging questions before recording them helps to ensure that all students have an idea about what to write and can give students confidence in their responses.
  • Some students may benefit from having access to "hint cards": small slips of paper or index cards that they turn over for hints about how/where to find the answers to text-dependent questions. For example, a hint card might say, "Look in the third paragraph."
  • Some students may benefit from having key sections pre-highlighted in their texts. This will help them focus on small sections rather than scanning the whole text for answers.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Discussion: Analyzing the Introduction (6 minutes)

  • Remind students that the Introduction is where an author helps the reader understand what this whole book is going to be about and gives the reader a reason to keep reading. Consider explaining that the Introduction is like an outline of the author's message and the key concepts he will use to argue his message.
  • Display the Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart and create a new row to record new thinking based on the reading done in class.Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "How does Mark Kurlansky continue to introduce his idea of fish depletion in the Introduction?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses. Listen for and guide students to understand that he sets up the rest of the book by introducing three main reasons (overfishing, pollution and global warming) for the problem and presenting some research to support his claims.
  • Record this on the Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart. See Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart (answers, for teacher reference) for a model.
  • Capturing students' ideas on an anchor chart can ensure easy reference later and can enable students to see at a glance how an idea has developed through a text.

Homework

Homework
  • Reread the excerpt of the Introduction that you read in class today.
  • Read "The Story of Kram and Ailat: Part 1" (the graphic novel) at the end of the Introduction of World without Fish. Answer this focus question on your structured notes in your journal:

-   "What do we learn about fishing from the graphic novel? How does Mark Kurlansky introduce the idea of fish depletion in the graphic novel?"

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