End of Unit 1 Assessment: Analyzing Author’s Point of View and How it is Conveyed | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M3B:U1:L11

End of Unit 1 Assessment: Analyzing Author’s Point of View and How it is Conveyed

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can determine an author's point of view or purpose in an informational text. (RI.6.6)
  • I can explain how an author's point of view is conveyed in an informational text. (RI.6.6)

Supporting Targets

  • I can identify Mark Kurlansky's point of view.
  • I can explain how Mark Kurlansky conveys his point of view.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Structured notes for "The Story of Kram and Ailat: Part 6" (from homework)
  • End of Unit 1 Assessment: Analyzing Author's Point of View and How it is Conveyed in Chapter 5 of World without Fish

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A.  Engaging the Reader: Graphic Novel Part 6 (6 minutes)

B.  Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A.  End of Unit 1 Assessment (32 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A.  Tracing the Development of an Idea (5 minutes)

4.  Homework

A.  None.

  • This lesson is the End of Unit 1 Assessment. Students repeat what they have been practicing over the past few lessons in analyzing point of view with a new excerpt of text: pages 70-75 from Chapter 5 of World without Fish.
  • Assess student responses using the NYS Grade 6 2-Point Rubric--Short Response.
  • Post: Learning targets; Graphic Novel: Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart; Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart.

Vocabulary

Do not preview vocabulary.

Materials

  • Graphic Novel: Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart (begun in Lesson 4)
  • Graphic Novel: Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart (answers, for teacher reference)
  • End of Unit 1 Assessment: Analyzing Author's Point of View and How it is Conveyed in Chapter 5 of World without Fish (one per student; one for display)
  • Sticky notes (eight per student)
  • Highlighters (any color; one per student)
  • World without Fish (book; distributed in Lesson 1)
  • End of Unit 1 Assessment: Analyzing Author's Point of View and How it is Conveyed in Chapter 5 of World without Fish (answers, for teacher reference)
  • NYS Grade 6 2-Point Rubric--Short Response (for teacher reference)
  • Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2)
  • Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart (answers, for teacher reference)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Graphic Novel Part 6 (6 minutes)

  • Remind students of the of the homework focus question: "What do we learn about fishing from the graphic novel? How does Mark Kurlansky illustrate and elaborate on the idea of fish depletion here?"
  • Invite students to refer to their structured notes homework and discuss their answers with their triads.
  • Select volunteers to share their responses with the whole group. Listen for them to explain that the author illustrates and elaborates on the idea by returning to an idea discussed in an earlier part of the graphic novel and describing how overfishing had impacts in the ocean and on land.
  • Record students' ideas on the posted Graphic Novel: Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart. See the Graphic Novel: Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart (answers, for teacher reference) as a guide.
  • Opening the lesson by asking students to share their homework makes them accountable for completing it. It also gives you the opportunity to monitor which students are not doing their homework.
  • Capturing students' ideas on an anchor chart can ensure easy reference later and can enable students to see at a glance how an idea has developed through a text.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Invite students to read the learning targets aloud with you:

*   "I can identify Mark Kurlansky's point of view."

*   "I can explain how Mark Kurlansky conveys his point of view."

  • Remind students that these are similar to the learning targets they have been working with for the past several lessons. Tell them that today they will show how well they can demonstrate these targets independently in an assessment.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. End of Unit 1 Assessment (32 minutes)

  • Distribute an End of Unit 1 Assessment: Analyzing Author's Point of View and How it is Conveyed to each student, along with sticky notes and highlighters. Remind students they will also need their text World without Fish.
  • Invite students to read through the questions with you:

*   "Read pages 70-75 of World without Fish for the gist from 'Some governments ...' on page 70 to the end of page 75. It is optional for you to use the sticky notes to annotate the gist as you read."

*   "Analyze the excerpt for Mark Kurlansky's point of view of the Great Banks codfish situation, one paragraph at a time, and complete the point of view graphic organizer as you have in previous lessons. Provide at least three examples of his point of view of the Great Banks codfish situation."

  • Remind students that the graphic organizer on the assessment handout is similar to the one they have been using to analyze point of view in previous lessons.
  • Remind the class that because this is an assessment, it is to be completed independently. However, if students need assistance, they should raise a hand to speak with a teacher.
  • Circulate and support students as they work. During an assessment, your prompting should be minimal.
  • At the conclusion of the allotted time, collect the End of Unit 1 Assessment, which you will assess using the End of Unit 1 Assessment: Analyzing Author's Point of View and How it is Conveyed (answers, for teacher reference) and the Grade 6 2-Point Rubric--Short Response.
  • Congratulate students on their hard work during the assessment and throughout the unit.
  • If students receive accommodations for assessment, communicate with the cooperating service providers regarding the practices of instruction in use during this study, as well as the goals of the assessment.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Tracing the Development of an Idea (5 minutes)

  • Focus students' attention on the posted Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart.  Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "How does Kurlansky illustrate and elaborate on the idea of fish depletion in the excerpt you have read today?"

  • Select volunteers to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that he illustrates and elaborates on the idea by providing an example of fish depletion that could have been avoided.
  • Record this on the Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart. See Tracing the Development of an Idea anchor chart (answers, for teacher reference) for a model.
  • Capturing students' ideas on an anchor chart can ensure easy reference later and can enable students to see at a glance how an idea has developed through a text.

Homework

Homework
  • None

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