Analyzing Author’s Point of View: Chapter 5 of World without Fish | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M3B:U1:L10

Analyzing Author’s Point of View: Chapter 5 of World without Fish

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can determine an author's point of view or purpose in an informational text. (RI.6.6)
  • I can explain how an author's point of view is conveyed in an informational text. (RI.6.6)

Supporting Targets

  • I can analyze Mark Kurlansky's point of view in an excerpt of Chapter 5.
  • I can explain how he conveys his point of view.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Structured notes for pages 63-69 (from homework)
  • Author's Point of View graphic organizer: pages 63-69

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A.  Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A.  Analyzing Kurlansky's Point of View of Fishermen (30 minutes)

B.  Triad and Whole Group Critique (10 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A.  Self-Assessment (3 minutes)

4.  Homework

A.  Read "The Story of Kram and Ailat: Part 6" (the graphic novel) at the end of Chapter 5. Answer the focus question on your structured notes.

  • This is the second of the two-lesson cycle started in Lesson 9. Students analyze the same excerpt they read for the gist in the previous lesson: pages 63-68 of World without Fish. In this lesson, students identify Kurlansky's point of view of fishermen and how he conveyed his point of view.
  • In order to gradually prepare for the end of unit assessment in the next lesson, students work independently to complete their point of view graphic organizer in this lesson.
  • Students also perform a whole group critique of a completed graphic organizer to help them improve their work and their understanding of the process of analyzing point of view. Ensure this is done carefully and sensitively--invite a volunteer who would like to share his or her work and make it clear what the student is volunteering for. Ensure that the focus is on how to improve, rather than what is wrong with the work. The suggested questions in Work Time B help to make it a positive learning experience.
  • Review:

-   Author's Point of View: Pages 63-68 (answers, for teacher reference; see supporting materials). Please note that these are just suggestions. Students may have additional ideas.

-   Review Fist to Five in Checking for Understanding techniques (see Appendix).

  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

point of view, convey, infer

Materials

  • Author's Point of View graphic organizer: pages 63-68 (one per student)
  • Author's Point of View graphic organizer: pages 63-68 (answers, for teacher reference)
  • World without Fish (book; distributed in Lesson 1)
  • Highlighters (any color; one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Invite students to read the learning targets aloud with you:

*   "I can analyze Mark Kurlansky's point of view in an excerpt of Chapter 5."

*   "I can explain how he conveys his point of view."

  • Remind students of what point of viewconvey, and infer mean.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.
  • Discussing and clarifying the language of learning targets helps build academic vocabulary.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Analyzing Kurlansky's Point of View of Fishermen (30 minutes)

  • Remind students that for homework they analyzed Mark Kurlansky's point of view of fishermen. Invite students to share their thinking with their triads using their structured notes homework.
  • Distribute the Author's Point of View graphic organizer: pages 63-69 and ask students to take out their World without Fish texts. Remind students that they filled in the same organizer in Lesson 8 using an excerpt from Chapter 4. Invite students to reread the column headings with you.
  • Point out that to get them started there are already two claims, which they need to complete with evidence from the text and by explaining how the author conveys his point of view.
  • Tell students you want them to work independently this time, taking pages 63-69 one paragraph at a time and analyzing for point of view, recording their ideas on the graphic organizer. Remind students that some paragraphs may not contain evidence of Mark Kurlansky's point of view, so they can continue reading if that is the case.
  • Distribute highlighters and circulate to support students as they work. Ask guiding questions and refer to the Author's Point of View graphic organizer: pages 63-69 (answers, for teacher reference) to guide students:

*   "What words or text features led you to make that claim about his point of view?"

  • Providing models of expected work supports all learners, but especially supports challenged learners.
  • When reviewing graphic organizers or recording forms, consider using a document camera to display the document for students who struggle with auditory processing.

B. Triad and Whole Group Critique (10 minutes)

  • Invite students to get into their triads to share their answers and to make revisions/additions as they think necessary.
  • Invite a volunteer to share his or her work with the whole group for a critique. Take each part of the organizer one claim at a time and invite students to help you make suggestions to improve the work. Ask students:

*   "Does this quote support the claim?"

*   "Are there any other words you would highlight here?"

*   "Would you add anything to this explanation about how the author conveys his point of view?"

  • Refer to the Author's Point of View graphic organizer: pages 63-68 (answers, for teacher reference) to make suggestions to improve student work.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Self-Assessment (3 minutes)

  • Read each learning target. Invite students to show a Fist to Five for how confident they feel about each one. Make a note of those students who are still unsure and be sure to make time to address their concerns before the assessment in the next lesson.
  • Preview homework and distribute the structured notes.

Homework

Homework
  • Read "The Story of Kram and Ailat: Part 6" (the graphic novel) at the end of Chapter 5. Answer this focus question on your structured notes in your journal:

-   "What do we learn about fishing from the graphic novel? How does Mark Kurlansky illustrate and elaborate on the idea of fish depletion here?"

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