Introducing World Without Fish | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M3B:U1:L1

Introducing World Without Fish

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can determine the main idea of an informational text based on details in the text. (RI.6.2)
  • I can analyze how key individuals, events, or ideas are developed throughout a text. (RI.6.3)
  • I can use a variety of strategies to determine word meaning in informational texts. (RI.6.4)

Supporting Targets

  • I can find the gist of an excerpt of the Introduction of World without Fish.
  • I can use evidence from the text to answer text-dependent questions.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Sticky notes for gist
  • Text-Dependent Questions: Pages x-xii

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A.  Introducing the Text: World without Fish (6 minutes)

B.  Unpacking Learning Targets (3 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A.  Reading for Gist: Pages x-xii (15 minutes)

B.  Text-Dependent Questions: Pages x-xii (18 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A.  Main Ideas (3 minutes)

4.  Homework

A.  Reread the excerpt of the introduction you read today (pages x to xii). Use evidence flags to gather evidence as you read and answer the focus question on your structured notes.

  • This lesson launches a new module. It starts with students becoming oriented to World without Fish, one of the two central texts. Because of the complexity of the text, students will read only short excerpts of it at any given time. They will read excerpts first during the lesson--often with the assistance of a teacher-led close reading--to fully understand the content, and then they will reread at home, gathering evidence on evidence flags as they have in previous modules and answering a focus question that will challenge them to think more deeply.
  • This lesson includes an opportunity for students to flip through World without Fish to take note of its beautiful illustrations, images, and other striking text features. This will help build students' excitement for tackling this challenging text. Throughout the unit, students continue to focus on the text features during their initial "gist" reading of sections of text.
  • Students will read excerpts of the Introduction over two lessons, reading for the gist in Lesson 1 and then digging deeper in Lesson 2.
  • At the end of this lesson, students are given structured notes on which to record their homework. Post or display the homework focus question at the conclusion of the lesson and instruct students to copy the question and columns for taking notes into a journal rather than use the structured notes handout itself. In either case, establishing a routine will be important, as this homework structure will be repeated throughout the unit. The homework focus question is also on the reading calendar. The focus question is often quite similar from lesson to lesson, since students are tracing the author's argument.
  • In advance:

-   Create triads who will work together to read, think, talk, and write about World without Fish. Intentionally place students in groups that are different from previous triads.

-   Review pages x-xii of the Introduction of World without Fish.

  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

gist, fish depletion; unravel, cormorants, Industrial Revolution (xi), generation (xii)

Materials

  • Equity sticks
  • World without Fish by Mark Kurlansky (book; one per student)
  • World without Fish word-catcher (one per student)
  • Dictionary (at least one per triad)
  • Sticky notes (five per student)
  • Text-Dependent Questions: Pages x-xii (one per student)
  • Close Reading Guide: Pages x-xii (for teacher reference)
  • Structured notes (one to display or one per student; see Teaching Notes)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Introducing the Text: World without Fish (6 minutes)

  • Write the title of the text on the board. Ask students to discuss with an elbow partner:

*   "Imagine a world without fish. What would your life be like without fish? Would it be any different? How?"

  • Select volunteers to share their responses. Ask for a show of hands:

*   "Who likes to eat fish?"

  • Summarize what you see, for example: "Wow--most of you like fish!"
  • Ask students to discuss with an elbow partner:

*   "What kinds of fish do you like to eat?"

  • Consider using equity sticks to select students to share their responses.
  • Distribute World without Fish by Mark Kurlansky to each student. Tell students that World without Fish is an informational text.
  • Invite students to spend a few minutes flipping through the book.
  • Ask students to discuss with an elbow partner:

*   "What do you notice?"

*   "What do you wonder?"

*   "What excites you about this book?"

  • Select students to share their responses with the whole group. Listen for students to notice the images, the large bold words, the graphic novel within the book, the illustrations, etc. Try to generate enthusiasm by pointing out the things that catch your eye when you look at the book, such as the colorful illustrations and the bold fonts.
  • Post the list of new triads and invite students to get into their groups. Tell them that they will work with these same triads throughout the first half of this unit.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (3 minutes)

  • Invite students to read the learning targets along with you.

*   "I can find the gist of an excerpt of the Introduction of World without Fish."

*   "I can use evidence from the text to answer text-dependent questions."

  • Ask triads to discuss:

*   "What are the important words or phrases in the learning targets? Why do you think those are important?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses and circle the words and phrases they suggest. Make sure gist is circled.
  • Focus students on the word "gist." Ask triads to discuss:

*   "What is the gist, and how do we read for it?"

  • Consider using equity sticks to select students to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that the gist is what the text is mostly about and that you summarize the main points as you do a first read.
  • Remind students that they have been practicing reading for the gist in previous modules. Tell them that they will be using their reading skills to dive into the message from this author.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reading for Gist: Pages x-xii (15 minutes)

  • Invite a student to read aloud the learning target about reading for the gist.

*   "I can find the gist of an excerpt of the Introduction of World without Fish."

  • Explain to students that they are going to read in their heads as you read aloud from pages x to xii, beginning at "Most stories about the destruction of the planet" and stopping after the bolded words, "and more responsibilities than any other generation in history."
  • When you have finished reading the excerpt aloud, ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "What do you now know about this book? What is it going to be about?"

  • Consider using equity sticks to select students to share their ideas with the class. Listen for students to explain that from this excerpt, it seems like the book is going to be about how species of fish that we eat might die out in the next 50 years.
  • Distribute World without Fish word-catchers to each student.
  • Tell students that this a challenging text, but reassure them that you know they are going to be able to understand it by reading it in small pieces. Explain that now that students have read the excerpt once through, they are going to work with their triads to read it again for the gist, annotate the gist on sticky notes, and record unfamiliar words on their word-catchers. Remind students that they have been building reading stamina in previous modules and now they are ready to take on something more challenging.
  • Model how to find the gist with page x. Reread it aloud and ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "What is this page mostly about?"

  • Select volunteers to share their responses. Listen for students to explain that it is mostly about how World without Fish is a story about how the earth could be destroyed. Record this on a sticky note and place it in your copy of the book, instructing students to do the same.
  • Ask:

*   "Are there any unfamiliar words on this page?"

  • Invite students to record any unfamiliar vocabulary on their word-catchers.
  • Ask:

*   "What strategies do you already have for figuring out unfamiliar vocabulary?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses and listen for them to explain that they can look at the root word for clues, read around the word, use context clues, or use a dictionary to determine the meaning of the word. Pass out dictionaries to each triad. Remind students that if they can't work out the meaning of a word, they are to wait for those words to be shared and discussed with the whole group later.
  • Distribute five sticky notes to each student. Remind students that the goal is for them to understand the basic idea of the excerpt one piece at a time. They will write the gist of each section on separate sticky notes as they read.
  • Circulate and support students as they read. For those who need more support, ask them to practice telling you the gist of a section before they write it on their sticky note.
  • As students finish up, refocus whole group. Focus students on the word unravel, and ask them to discuss in triads:

*   "Read the sentence containing the word unravel. Using context clues from the rest of the sentence, what do you think it might mean? What words would you replace it with?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses. Listen for and guide students to understand that unravel means "to undo," so here the author means there could be serious negative consequences for life on earth.
  • Invite students to share any unfamiliar vocabulary words they found, along with the definition if they found it. If they were unable to work out the definition from the context or find it in a dictionary, encourage other students to assist them with the definition. To keep things moving, if no one else knows what the word means, define it for the class. Be sure that the following words are discussed: cormorantsIndustrial Revolution, and generation.
  • Remind students to record new words on their word-catchers.
  • Hearing a complex text read slowly, fluently, and without interruption or explanation promotes fluency for students. They are hearing a strong reader read the text aloud with accuracy and expression and are simultaneously looking at and thinking about the words on the printed page. Be sure to set clear expectations that students read along silently in their heads as you read the text aloud.
  • Allow students to grapple with a complex text before explicit teaching of vocabulary. After students have read for the gist, they can identify challenging vocabulary for themselves.
  • Asking students to identify challenging vocabulary helps them monitor their understanding of a complex text. When students annotate the text by circling these words, it can also provide a formative assessment for the teacher.

B. Text-Dependent Questions: Pages x-xii (18 minutes)

  • Distribute Text-Dependent Questions: Pages x-xii and guide students through it using the Close Reading Guide: Pages x-xii (for teacher reference).
  • Asking students to discuss challenging questions before recording them helps to ensure that all students have an idea about what to write and can give students confidence in their responses.
  • Some students may benefit from having access to "hint cards": small slips of paper or index cards that they turn over for hints about how/where to find the answers to text-dependent questions. For example, a hint card might say, "Look in the third paragraph."
  • Some students may benefit from having key sections pre-highlighted in their texts. This will help them focus on small sections rather than scanning the whole text for answers.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Main Ideas (3 minutes)

  • Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "What main ideas are you are taking away after reading this excerpt?"

  • Select volunteers to share their responses. Listen for students to explain that Mark Kurlansky thinks the planet is in danger because people are not looking after it as they should.
  • Tell students that the way we can describe fish species dying out is fish depletion, because depletion means the numbers are going down.
  • Distribute the structured notes for homework.

Homework

Homework
  • Reread the excerpt of the Introduction you read in class today (pages x-xii), beginning at, "Most stories about the destruction of the planet," and stopping after the bolded words, "and more responsibilities than any other generation in history." Use evidence flags to gather evidence as you read to answer this focus question on your structured notes in your journal:

-   "How does Mark Kurlansky introduce his idea of fish depletion in the first few pages of World without Fish?"

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