Evaluating Eyewitness Accounts | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M3A:U3:L8

Evaluating Eyewitness Accounts

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can write informative/explanatory texts that convey ideas and concepts using relevant information that is carefully selected and organized. (W.6.2)
  • I can organize my information using various strategies (e.g., definition/classification, comparison/contrast, cause/effect). (W.6.2b)
  • I can develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, and quotations. (W.6.2d)
  • I can produce text (print or nonprint) that explores a variety of cultures and perspectives. (W.6.4a)
  • I can use evidence from a variety of grade-appropriate texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.6.9)
  • I can apply grade 6 Reading standards to literature (e.g., "compare and contrast texts in different forms or genres [e.g., stories and poems; historical novels and fantasy stories] in terms of their approaches to similar themes and topics"). (W.6.9a)

Supporting Targets

  • I can evaluate research to choose the most relevant eyewitness accounts showing a variety of perspectives.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Eyewitness account quotes recorded on the Newspaper Article Planning graphic organizer

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Unpacking the Learning Target (3 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Introducing the Newspaper Article Planning Graphic Organizer (20 minutes)

B. Evaluating Eyewitness Quotes (20 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Update Anchor Chart (2 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Continue reading your independent reading book.

  • In the previous lesson, students evaluated the factual information they collected through research in the first half of the unit. Now, in this lesson, students evaluate the eyewitness quotes they have collected in order to choose those most relevant to the factual information while also being compelling. This may require more modeling time than has been allocated in this lesson, depending on how well your students understand the process. Some students may require additional support and assistance as they work.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

evaluate

Materials

  • Newspaper Article Planning graphic organizer (one per student and one for display)
  • Researching Factual Information graphic organizer (from Unit 2, Lesson 13)
  • Researching Eyewitness Accounts graphic organizer (from Lesson 2)
  • Students' completed Mid-Unit 3 Assessment (from Lessons 4 and 5; returned to students in Lesson 7)
  • Newspaper Article Criteria anchor chart (from Unit 2, Lesson 12)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Unpacking the Learning Target (3 minutes)

    • Invite students to read the learning target with you:

*   "I can evaluate research to choose the most relevant eyewitness accounts showing a variety of perspectives."

    • Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "What does it mean to evaluate?"

    • Select volunteers to share their responses. Listen for students to explain that evaluate means to compare the research against criteria to determine which pieces are the most relevant to include in their newspaper articles.
    • Explain that today, as in Lesson 7, students are going to be evaluating which eyewitness accounts are the most relevant evidence for their newspaper articles.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Introducing the Newspaper Article Planning Graphic Organizer (20 minutes)

    • Display and distribute the Newspaper Article Planning graphic organizer. Invite students to read through each of the boxes with you and to discuss what they think should go in each box. When you arrive at the graphic organizer, tell students to ignore the first column for now, as they will focus on that in the next lesson.
    • Invite students to record their angle in the first box.
    • Remind students that on their Researching Factual Information graphic organizer in the previous lesson they starred the factual information that is most relevant and compelling for their angle.
    • Invite students to transfer the starred information from their Researching Factual Information graphic organizer to the second column of the new organizer. Tell them not to worry about the first column of the organizer or the order they record them in at this stage, as this is something we will address in the next lesson.
  • Graphic organizers and recording forms engage students more actively and provide the necessary scaffolding that is especially critical for learners with lower levels of language proficiency and/or learning.
  • Inviting students to discuss their ideas in triads before they record anything on their graphic organizers can help to ensure that all students are engaged in the thinking process. It can also provide additional support to ELL students.

B. Evaluating Eyewitness Quotes (20 minutes)

    • Remind students that in the previous lesson, they evaluated their factual information to identify the information most relevant to their angle. Tell students that now that they have identified the factual information that is relevant for their angle, they need to do the same thing with their eyewitness quotes on their Researching Eyewitness Accounts graphic organizer in order to choose a few compelling eyewitness quotes to give readers an emotional connection and to make them want to keep reading.
    • Tell students that when evaluating their eyewitness quotes, they need to not only determine which are relevant to the angle and compelling, but also determine which will work to support the factual information they have chosen.
    • Select a student and invite her to help you model this process with the whole group. Invite the student to share her angle with the whole group.
    • Ask students:

*   "Look at these this first eyewitness quote. Does it support her angle? Is it compelling?"

    • Ask the student you are modeling with what she thinks. Invite her to put a star next to it if it does.
    • Explain that students should aim to have no more than three eyewitness quotes in their newspaper article, so if they have more than three quotes starred when they have finished, they must evaluate the quotes further to choose only the three most relevant and compelling.
    • Model this with the student. Once the student has two quotes starred, ask the class:

*   "Which of these is the most relevant and compelling for the angle? And supports the factual information chosen?"

      • Explain that students are going to continue working with their partner from Work Time A to do exactly the same thing with their Researching Eyewitness Accounts graphic organizer and their completed Mid-Unit 3 Assessment until they have three eyewitness quotes.
      • Circulate to assist students. Ask guiding questions:

*   "Does this quote support your angle? Does it work with the factual information you have chosen?"

*   "Which of these two quotes is the most relevant? Which is the most compelling? Why?"

  • Invite students to record their three eyewitness quotes in the final column of their Newspaper Article Planning graphic organizer.
  • Modeling the activity for students can provide them with the expectations you have of their independent work. It can also provide students with the confidence to work independently, giving you time to support students who require additional support during work time.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Update Anchor Chart (2 minutes)

    • Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "After this lesson, are there any new criteria for newspaper articles we need to record on the anchor chart?"

    • Select volunteers to share their responses. Record students' ideas on the Newspaper Article Criteria anchor chart. Ideas could include:

-   Compelling and relevant research

  • Anchor charts are a way to capture whole group thinking to refer to later.

Homework

Homework
  • Continue reading your independent reading book.

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