Analyzing the Features of a Newspaper Article | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M3A:U3:L7

Analyzing the Features of a Newspaper Article

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can write informative/explanatory texts that convey ideas and concepts using relevant information that is carefully selected and organized. (W.6.2)
  • I can produce text (print or nonprint) that explores a variety of cultures and perspectives (W.6.4a)
  • I can use evidence from a variety of grade-appropriate texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.6.9)

Supporting Targets

  • I can identify the features of a newspaper article.
  • I can evaluate research to choose the most relevant factual information to support my angle.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Annotated newspaper articles

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A.  Unpacking Learning Targets (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Receive Feedback from Mid-Unit 3 Assessment (5 minutes)

B. Identifying the Features of a Newspaper Article (15 minutes)

C. Identifying Relevant Factual Information (17 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Update Anchor Chart (3 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Continue reading your independent reading book.

  • Be prepared to return the Mid-Unit 3 Assessments with feedback to students in this lesson.
  • In this lesson, students evaluate the information they collected through research in the first half of the unit in order to identify the information that is most relevant to the angle they are taking in their newspaper article. This may require more modeling time than has been allocated in this lesson, depending on how well your students understand the process. Some students may require additional support and assistance as they work.
  • In advance: Prepare age-appropriate newspaper articles from real newspapers, one per team and one for you to use as a model. Try to choose front page news rather than "feature" articles. When possible, try to give each team a different newspaper article. Ensure there are as many of the features listed in Work Time B in each article as possible. Students may want to refer to these models once they begin drafting their own articles in Lesson 9 Determine how you want students to organize and save these materials.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

angle

Materials

  • Students' completed Mid-Unit 3 Assessments (with feedback; from Lessons 4 and 5)
  • Newspaper articles (one per team and one for display; see Teaching Note)
  • Newspaper Article Criteria anchor chart (from Unit 2, Lesson 12)
  • Five W's web organizer (from Lesson 6)
  • Researching Factual Information graphic organizer (from Unit 2, Lesson 13)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Unpacking Learning Targets (5 minutes)

    • Invite students to read the learning targets with you:

*   "I can identify the features of a newspaper article."

*   "I can evaluate research to choose the most relevant factual information to support my angle."

    • Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "Why are we identifying the features of a newspaper article? How will that help us write a newspaper article?"

    • Listen for students to explain that identifying the features of a newspaper article will help them ensure that they include all of those features in their own newspaper articles, which will make their newspaper articles appear more authentic.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs


A. Receive Feedback from Mid-Unit 3 Assessment (5 minutes)

    • Hand back students' completedMid-Unit 3 Assessments and ask students to spend time reading your feedback. Invite students to write their name on the board if they have questions, so that you can follow up either immediately or later in the lesson.
    • Hand back students' completedMid-Unit 3 Assessments and ask students to spend time reading your feedback. Invite students to write their name on the board if they have questions, so that you can follow up either immediately or later in the lesson.
  • Receiving feedback from assessments can help students improve their achievement of the learning target later.

B. Identifying the Features of a Newspaper Article (15 minutes)

    • Explain that today students are going to be looking at real newspaper articles to determine the features. Ask:

*   "What do I mean by 'features'?"

    • Cold call students for their responses. Listen for and guide students to understand that features are those things that are outside the content--for example, a headline is a feature and a picture is a feature.
    • Explain to students that not only are they going to identify features but they are going to identify the purpose of each feature as well.
    • Display one of the newspaper articles. Circle the headline in marker and ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "What is the purpose of the headline?"

    • Select students to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that the purpose of the headline is to catch the attention of readers and give them an idea of what the newspaper article is about. Annotate the newspaper article to note the purpose of this feature.
    • Distribute the newspaper articles, one to each team, and invite triads to do the same.
    • Circulate to assist triads. Ask guiding questions:

*   "Why have you circled that feature?"

*   "What is the purpose of that feature?"

    • Cold call triads to share what they found with the whole group. Record students' suggestions on the Newspaper Article Criteria anchor chart. Ensure the following features and purposes are included:

-   Headline: to grab the attention of readers and give them an idea of what the content of the article is about

-   Byline: to let readers know who wrote the article

-   Subheadings: to introduce a new topic or idea

-   Graphic image with caption: to support the content of the article, and make the article "real" for readers.

  • Inviting students to analyze authentic models can give them a clearer idea of what their final product should look like.

C. Identifying Relevant Factual Information (17 minutes)

    • Explain to students that now that they have collected all of the factual information, eyewitness quotes, determined the five W's and the angle, and determined what features they must include in their newspaper articles, they need to start thinking about which factual information they are going to use in their newspaper articles. They have collected a lot of information, but it isn't all appropriate for their angle.
    • Tell students to take out their Five W's web organizer from Lesson 6 and to remind themselves of the angle they are taking to answer the research question: How did the 1906 earthquake and fire affect the people of San Francisco?
    • Tell students that to be able to take that angle, they need to use factual information and eyewitness quotes from multiple perspectives that support and help them to convey that angle successfully to a reader.
    • Model how to do this for students with a think-aloud. Explain that your angle is "The hardships people faced after the earthquake and fire" and record this on the board. Ask a student to provide you with his or her Researching Factual Information graphic organizer from the first half of the unit.
    • Go through each piece of information and ask students:

*   "Does this piece of factual information show the hardships people faced after the earthquake and fire?"

    • Ask for a show of hands from those who think it does and then those who think it doesn't. Clarify your thinking on this for the students. For example:

*   "I think it does show the hardships people faced because it describes how people had to wait in lines for food rations for two or more hours at a time."

    • If the information does support that angle, put a star next to it on the Researching Factual Information graphic organizer.
    • Invite students to pair up with someone who is working on an angle that is similar to theirs. Ask them to work together to evaluate all of the factual information they have collected on their Researching Factual Information graphic organizers and their Mid-Unit 3 Assessments to identify the information that is relevant to their angle.
    • Circulate to assist students. Ask guiding questions such as:

*   "How does that information support your angle?"

  • Modeling the activity for students can provide them with the expectations you have of their independent work. It can also provide students with the confidence to work independently, giving you time to support students who require additional support during work time.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Update Anchor Chart (3 minutes)

    • Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "After this lesson, are there any new criteria for newspaper articles we need to record on the anchor chart?"

    • Select volunteers to share their responses. Record students' ideas on the Newspaper Article Criteria anchor chart. Ideas could include:

-   Contains multiple perspectives: eyewitness accounts

  • Anchor charts are a way to capture whole group thinking to refer to later.

Homework

Homework
  • Continue reading your independent reading book.

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