The Five W’s | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M3A:U3:L6

The Five W’s

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can write informative/explanatory texts that convey ideas and concepts using relevant information that is carefully selected and organized. (W.6.2)

Supporting Targets

  • I can use the information from my research to determine who, what, where, when, and why to form the basis of my newspaper article.
  • I can choose a compelling angle for my article that is supported by the information from my research.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Five W's web organizer

 

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A.  Unpacking Learning Targets (3 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Determining the Who, What, Where, When, and Why (19 minutes)

B. Determining the Angle (20 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Update Anchor Chart (3 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Continue reading your independent reading book.

  • In this lesson, students use their research to determine the who, what, where, when, and why of their newspaper article.
  • When choosing an angle for individual newspaper articles, encourage students to look across their research and to consider what is compelling.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

angle, compelling

Materials

  • Performance Task Prompt for the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire (distributed in Unit 2, Lesson 1)
  • Five W's web organizer (one per student and one for display)
  • Model newspaper article: "Sandy wreaks havoc across Northeast; at least 11 dead" (from Unit 2, Lesson 12)
  • Researching Factual Information graphic organizer (from Lesson 13)
  • Researching Eyewitness Accounts graphic organizer (from Lessons 2 and 3)
  • Mid-Unit 3 Assessment Part 1: Researching the Destruction Caused by the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake and Fires (from Lesson 4)
  • Newspaper Article Criteria anchor chart (from Unit 2, Lesson 12)
  • Scrap paper (one piece per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Unpacking Learning Targets (3 minutes)

    • Invite students to read the learning targets with you:

* "I can use the information from my research to determine who, what, where, when, and why to form the basis of my newspaper article."

*   "I can choose a compelling angle for my article that is supported by the information from my research."

    • Remind students of what a compelling angle is. Ask students:

*   "Based on these learning targets, what do you think you will be doing in this lesson?"

    • Listen for students to explain that they will be determining the who, what, where, when, and why of their own newspaper articles.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Determining the Who, What, Where, When, and Why (19 minutes)

    • Invite students to reread the Performance Task Promptfor the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire to ground themselves in what is expected of them at the end of this unit.
    • Remind students of the five W's and that journalists always make sure they include this crucial information in their newspaper articles.
    • Display the Five W's web organizer and model newspaper article: "Sandy wreaks havoc across Northeast; at least 11 dead". Invite students to help you fill out the displayed Five W's web graphic organizer for the model:

-   Who: The people affected by the hurricane

-   What: Destruction including injuries and deaths

-   Where: The Northeast of the United States

-   When: Monday

-   Why: Superstorm Sandy

    • Invite students to get take out the following materials and to look across the information they collected through research in the first half of this unit:

-    Researching Factual Information graphic organizer

-   Researching Eye Witness Accounts graphic organizer

-    Mid-Unit 3 Assessment: Researching the Destruction Caused by the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake and Fires

    • Invite students to discuss in triads:

*   "What do you think the who, what, where, when, and why will be for your newspaper article?

  • Distribute the Five W's web organizer and invite students to record the Who, What, Where, When, and Why on their organizer.
  • Circulate to assist students in filling out their organizer. Ask guiding questions:

*   "So looking across your research, who was affected?"

*   "What happened?"

*   "Where did it happen?"

*   "When did it happen?"

*   "Why did it happen?"

    • Select students to share their five W's with the whole group. These responses should all be very similar as the question is quite specific about the event:

-   Who: The people of San Francisco

-   What: Destruction, death, injury, loss

-   Where: San Francisco

-   When: April 18, 1906

Why: Earthquake and fire

  • Graphic organizers and recording forms engage students more actively and provide the necessary scaffolding that is especially critical for learners with lower levels of language proficiency and/or learning.
  • Inviting students to discuss their ideas in triads before they record anything on their graphic organizers can help to ensure that all students are engaged in the thinking process. It can also provide additional support to ELL students.
  • Guiding questions provide motivation for student engagement in the topic.

B. Determining the Angle (20 minutes)

    • Tell students that now that they have decided on the five W's, they need to think about the angle they are going to take. Remind students the angle is the main idea.
    • Remind them of the angle--the main idea--of the model: Hurricane Sandy caused widespread destruction including deaths and injuries.
    • Record this in the center of the Five W's web organizer.
    • Remind students that the research question is about the impact of the earthquake and fire on the community of San Francisco, so we know that the angle has to have something to do with the impact on the people. However, this is a very broad topic, so to make the article more compelling, they need to refine their focus. Ask students:

*   "What effect on the people could you focus on? The destruction of infrastructure (the buildings, the water mains, electricity)? The hardships people faced? The sadness at the loss (of family, homes, belongings, etc.)? The way people helped each other out?"

    • Tell students that the way they will determine the angle is by looking across the information they have collected through research to determine what angle their information lends itself to and what really stands out to them.
    • Refer to the Newspaper Article Criteria anchor chart and focus students on the word compelling. Remind them that they must make the newspaper article something that people want to read about. Ask students to consider what will be most interesting for people to read. Encourage them to consider what angle would make readers buy the newspaper if they saw it on the front page on a newsstand.
    • Invite students to look across the information they gathered through research and discuss in triads the possible angles that 1) their information from research will support and 2) are compelling. Ask them to record their ideas on scrap paper.
    • Circulate to support students:

*   "What angles or main ideas about the impact of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire on the community of San Francisco does the information from your research suggest?"

*   "Which angle is the most compelling? Which one would make people want to buy the newspaper to read the article?"

    • Invite students to look over their angle ideas to choose one that 1) contains the information from their research and 2) is compelling. Then direct them to record their angle in the middle of their Five W's web organizer. Explain that they do not need to take the same angle as the other people in their team--this is an individual decision.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Update Anchor Chart (3 minutes)

    • Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "After this lesson, are there any new criteria for newspaper articles we need to record on the anchor chart?"

    • Select volunteers to share their responses. Record students' ideas on the Newspaper Article Criteria anchor chart. Ideas could include:

-   Contains five W's: who, what, where, when, why.

  • Anchor charts are a way to capture whole group thinking to refer to later.

Homework

Homework
  • Continue reading your independent reading book.

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