Researching: Eyewitness Accounts, Part 2 | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M3A:U3:L3

Researching: Eyewitness Accounts, Part 2

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can recognize, interpret, and make connections in narratives, poetry, and drama, ethically and artistically to other texts, ideas, cultural perspectives, eras, personal events, and situations. (RL.6.11)
  • I can determine the main idea of an informational text based on details in the text. (RI.6.2)
  • I can summarize an informational text using only information from the text. (RI.6.2)
  • I can conduct short research projects to answer a question. (W.6.7)
  • I can use several sources in my research. (W.6.7)
  • I can refocus or refine my question when appropriate. (W.6.7)

Supporting Targets

  • I can interpret a short story and make connections between it and other texts I have read.
  • I can identify compelling quotes to answer my research questions in an eyewitness account.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Researching Eyewitness Accounts graphic organizer

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A. Unpacking Learning Targets (4 minutes)

B. Connecting the Ideas in Texts: Introducing a Play (17 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A. Researching: Eyewitness Accounts (19 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A. Review End of Unit 2 Assessment Feedback (5 minutes)

4.  Homework

A. Continue to read your independent reading book.

  • Due to a lack of age-appropriate, authentic resources, the short story that students will read in Opening B, "Waking Up in a Nightmare," has been written specifically for this lesson, for the purpose of addressing RL.6.11.
  • The Work Time of this lesson is a continuation of the previous lesson. In this lesson, students continue to research eyewitness accounts looking for quotes to answer their interview questions.
  • At the end of this lesson, students are given their End of Unit 2 Assessments with feedback. Invite students who have questions to write their names on a piece of paper on the board; address as many as you can in this lesson, but save the list of names in order to address questions in later lessons when you have the time available.
  • In preparation for the Mid-Unit 3 Assessment (in Lesson 4), organize the assessment research folders. These contain new materials in addition to the research folders used in Lesson 2 and this lesson. There should be one folder per team and each folder should contain enough of each resource for one per student, including one glossary per student. See supporting materials in Lesson 4.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

eyewitness account, compelling

Materials

  • "Waking Up in a Nightmare" (one per student and one to display)
  • Excerpts of "Comprehending the Calamity" (from Unit 2)
  • Dragonwings (book; distributed to students in Unit 1)
  • Stanza 9 of "Poem of the Earthquake" (from Lesson 1)
  • Scene 1: The Great Earthquake and Fires of 1906: A Dramatic Remembrance (from Lesson 2)
  • Connecting Texts anchor chart (from Lesson 1)
  • Connecting Texts anchor chart (answers, for teacher reference)
  • Exit Ticket: Interview Questions (completed in Lesson 1)
  • Researching Eyewitness Accounts graphic organizer (from Lesson 2; students may need a new one)
  • Research folders (distributed to teams in Lesson 2)
  • End of Unit 2 Assessments (students' completed assessments with teacher feedback)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Unpacking Learning Targets (4 minutes)

    • Invite students to read the learning targets with you:

*   "I can interpret a short story and make connections between it and other texts I have read."

*   "I can identify compelling quotes to answer my research questions in an eyewitness account."

    • Remind students that they had very similar learning targets in the previous lesson.
    • Remind students that journalists would normally interview people, but as this event happened more than 100 years ago, nearly all of the people who experienced it are no longer alive.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

B. Connecting the Ideas in Texts: Introducing a Play (17 minutes)

    • Remind students that the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire was such a big disaster that many people wrote eyewitness accounts about it, like Emma Burke; it featured in novels like Dragonwings; and people also wrote poems and plays about it.
    • Display and distribute "Waking Up in a Nightmare." Tell students this is a short story written about the earthquake.
    • Read the short story and invite students to follow along silently in their heads.
    • Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "What is this story about? How do you know?"

    • Select volunteers to share their ideas. Listen for students to explain that the short story is about a girl who wakes up after her house was destroyed by the earthquake, and she is remembering what happened through flashback memories.
    • Ask students to refer to their excerpts of "Comprehending the Calamity" from Unit 2, Chapter 9 of the novel Dragonwings, Stanza 9 of "Poem of the Earthquake," and Scene 1: The Great Earthquake and Fires of 1906: A Dramatic Remembrance to discuss in triads:

*   "How are the texts you have read about the earthquake so far connected? How do the experiences of the girl in this short story compare to Emma Burke's, Eliza Pittsinger's, Moon Shadow's, and the family in the play? What is similar about their experiences of the earthquake? What is different?"

    • Select volunteers to share their responses. Record students' ideas on the Connecting Texts anchor chart. Refer to the Connecting Texts anchor chart (answers, for teacher reference) for the kind of responses to guide students toward.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to
  • Consider grouping ELL students who speak the same first language to enable them to have a deeper discussion about the poem.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Researching: Eyewitness Accounts (19 minutes)

    • Remind students of the focus question for their newspaper articles (How did the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire affect the people of San Francisco?) and invite students to refer to their Exit Ticket: Interview Questions to remember the questions they wrote in Lesson 1 for interviewing eyewitnesses.
    • Remind students that as they can't interview real eyewitnesses (the event happened more than 100 years ago, so most of them are no longer alive), they are going to be reading eyewitness accounts and looking for quotes in the accounts that answer their questions.
    • Remind students also that in the model newspaper article there were eyewitness accounts from a few different people in order to give the reader different perspectives of the event. Explain that students should also aim to have quotes from different eyewitnesses in their own newspaper article, which is why they are going to do more research using the eyewitness accounts in this lesson.
    • Invite students to reread the directions at the top of their Researching Eyewitness Accounts graphic organizer to remind themselves of what they need to do.
    • Invite triads to follow the directions on their Researching Eyewitness Accounts graphic organizer to continue researching using their research folders. Remind students to discuss their ideas before writing anything on their individual graphic organizers.
    • Circulate to support students in reading the texts and selecting compelling quotes. Encourage triads to choose texts that are of an appropriate level for them. Ask guiding questions:

*   "Does this quote answer any of your interview questions? How?"

*   "Is it compelling?"

  • Graphic organizers and recording forms engage students more actively and provide the necessary scaffolding that is especially critical for learners with lower levels of language proficiency and/or learning.
  • When reviewing the graphic organizers or recording forms, consider using a document camera to display the document for students who struggle with auditory processing.
  • Guiding questions provide motivation for student engagement in the topic, and give a purpose to reading a text closely.
  • Inviting students to discuss their ideas in triads before they record anything on their graphic organizers can help to ensure that all students are engaged in the thinking process. It can also provide additional support to ELL students.
  • If students are grouped homogeneously, consider working with triads requiring more reading support to assist them in reading the text.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Review End of Unit 2 Assessment Feedback (5 minutes)

  • Return students' End of Unit 2 Assessments and invite them to spend time reading their feedback.
  • Invite students who have questions to write their names on a piece of paper on the board. Address as many in this lesson as possible and address the rest in the next lessons when you have time.

Homework

Homework
  • Continue to read your independent reading book.

Note: Preview Lesson 4 carefully and prepare materials for the texts in research folders for the Mid-Unit 3 Assessment.

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