End of Unit 3 Assessment: Drafting the Newspaper Article | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M3A:U3:L10

End of Unit 3 Assessment: Drafting the Newspaper Article

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can write informative/explanatory texts that convey ideas and concepts using relevant information that is carefully selected and organized. (W.6.2)

    a. I can introduce the topic of my text.

    b. I can organize my information using various strategies (e.g., definition/classification, comparison/contrast, cause/effect).

    c. I can include headings, graphics, and multimedia to help readers understand my ideas.

    d. I can develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, and quotations.

    e. I can use transitions to clarify relationships among my ideas.

    f. I can use contextually specific language/vocabulary to inform or explain about a topic.

    g. I can establish and maintain a formal style in my writing.

    h. I can construct a concluding statement or section of an informative/explanatory text.

  • I can produce text (print or nonprint) that explores a variety of cultures and perspectives. (W.6.4a)
  • I can use evidence from a variety of grade-appropriate texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.6.9)
  • I can apply grade 6 Reading standards to literature (e.g., "compare and contrast texts in different forms or genres [e.g., stories and poems; historical novels and fantasy stories] in terms of their approaches to similar themes and topics"). (W.6.9a)
  • I can integrate information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words to develop a coherent understanding of a topic or issue. (RI.6.7)

Supporting Targets

  • I can use active words and domain-specific vocabulary in my newspaper article.
  • I can draft an interesting, accurate, and objective newspaper article based on carefully selected evidence.

Ongoing Assessment

  • End of Unit 3 Assessment: Draft newspaper article

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Partner Feedback: Headlines and Subheadings (3 minutes)

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (4 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Analyzing Model: Drafting with Descriptive Word Choice (10 minutes)

B. Drafting Newspaper Article (25 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Debrief (3 minutes)

4. Homework

A. If you haven't already done so, finish your draft newspaper article.

B. Continue reading your independent reading book.

  • This lesson is the end of unit 3 assessment. Students draft their newspaper article based on the carefully selected factual information and eyewitness quotes they gathered on their Newspaper Article Planning graphic organizer in previous lessons. Given that newspapers today have various formats, there is not a guide for one format to use for their article. Instead keep the focus on students using the criteria established on the anchor chart.
  • Assess students' newspaper article drafts against the Newspaper Article Rubric.
  • Given that the final draft of the newspaper article is the performance task, students will be revising their newspaper articles over the next couple of lessons. If you take the drafts home to assess, ensure you bring them back for each lesson, as students will need them to revise their work and be ready to write their final draft in Lesson 12.
  • Some students may need additional time to finish their first drafts. Allow these students to take their work home to finish it, but emphasize that it must be returned in the next lesson so you can assess it.
  • Post: Learning targets; Newspaper Article Criteria anchor chart.

Vocabulary

domain-specific vocabulary, active verbs

Materials

  • Newspaper Article Planning graphic organizer (from Lesson 8)
  • Word-catchers (students' own, from this unit)
  • Model newspaper article for word choice: "Sandy wreaks havoc across Northeast; at least 11 dead" (one per student)
  • Newspaper Article Criteria anchor chart (from Unit 2, Lesson 12)
  • Drafting the Model Newspaper Article form (one for display)
  • Performance Task Prompt for the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire (from Unit 2, Lesson 1)
  • End of Unit 3 Assessment Prompt: Draft Newspaper Article: How the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake and Fire Affected the People of San Francisco (one per student)
  • Authentic newspaper articles (distributed and annotated in Lesson 7)
  • Newspaper Article Rubric (from Unit 2, Lesson 12)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Partner Feedback: Headlines and Subheadings (3 minutes)

    • Invite students to take out their Newspaper Article Planning graphic organizer to share with an elbow partner the headlines and subheadings drafted for homework.
    • Remind students that the headline and subheading should:

-   Make the angle of the newspaper article clear

-   Contain powerful and dramatic descriptive language to draw the reader in

    • Record the following sentence starters on the board.

*   "Your headline and subheading make me think about ..."

*   "The words that draw me in are ..."

    • Invite students to review the headline and subheading of their elbow partner's newspaper articles and to use the two sentence starters provided to give feedback.
    • Invite students to revise their headline and subheading based on the feedback they received, if they want to.
  • Reviewing homework can hold students accountable for completing homework. It can also give you an opportunity to see who is completing homework and who isn't.

 

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (4 minutes)

    • Invite students to read the learning targets with you:

*   "I can use active words and domain-specific vocabulary in my newspaper article."

*   "I can draft an interesting, accurate, and objective newspaper article based on carefully selected evidence."

    • Tell students that domain-specific vocabulary is words specific to a topic or study, such as "conflagration."
    • Tell students to take out their Word-catchers for the module.
    • Ask for volunteers:

*   "What words are good examples of domain-specific vocabulary that you want to use in your article?"

    • Call on students and listen for examples such as: temblor, trembler, undulating, militia, dynamite, gunpowder, refugees, feeding stations, shanties, camps, etc. Consider making a Word Wall from students' examples that can be referenced while students are writing. 
    • Invite students to turn and talk:

*   "Now that you have seen the learning targets for this lesson, what do you think you will be doing today?"

    • Listen for: "We going to draft our newspaper articles making sure we use domain-specific words."
    • Encourage students to use all their knowledge of a newspaper article from the anchor chart to draft their articles.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Analyzing Model: Drafting with Descriptive Word Choice (10 minutes)

    • Ask students to sit in triads.
    • Invite students to get into triads and to reread the model newspaper article: "Sandy wreaks havoc across Northeast; at least 11 dead."
    • Explain that domain-specific vocabulary, active verbs, and descriptive words have been used to make the newspaper article more compelling. Remind students that domain-specific vocabulary is vocabulary that is specific to the topic of hurricanes in this example. Tell students that active verbs are verbs that help the reader imagine the action: wreaked, ordered, lost, etc. Explain that passive verbs--for example, has, was, am--are used very little in newspaper articles.
    • Model highlighting the domain-specific vocabulary, active verbs, and descriptive words in the first paragraph. Ask students:

*   "Which of these words is domain-specific vocabulary?"

*   "What descriptive words have been used to make the newspaper article more compelling?"

*   "What active verbs have been used?"

    • Select volunteers to share their responses and highlight them on the displayed model newspaper article.
    • Invite students to circle any domain-specific vocabulary, active verbs, and descriptive words that have been used to make the model newspaper article more compelling.
    • Refocus the whole group. Ask students:

*   "So what do you notice about the word choice in this article?

*   "What do you notice about domain-specific vocabulary?"

*   "What do you notice about active verbs?"

*   "What do you notice about describing words?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses with the whole group. Listen for them to explain that there are a lot of domain-specific vocabulary, active verbs, and descriptive words in the article. Many of the words in the model fall into one of these categories.
  • Direct students' attention to the Newspaper Article Criteria anchor chart. Add these criteria:

-   Careful word choice: domain-specific vocabulary, active verbs, and descriptive words to make it compelling

-   Quotes used word-for-word with quotation marks.

  • Consider supporting some students by helping them make a next-steps list at the top of their draft article. This helps students chunk the task for revision into smaller steps.

B. Drafting Newspaper Article (25 minutes)

    • Display and distribute the Drafting the Model Newspaper Article form. Explain that this is the Newspaper Article Planning graphic organizer filled out for the model newspaper article. Invite students to compare the two. Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "What do you notice about how the journalist has transitioned from his ideas on the planning graphic organizer to write the model newspaper article?"

*   "What do you wonder?"

    • Select volunteers to share their responses. Listen for students to explain and add the following ideas to the Newspaper Article Criteria anchor chart:

-   Keep paragraphs brief (two to four sentences)

  • Invite students to reread the Performance Task Prompt for the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire to ground themselves again in what is expected of their work.
    • Distribute the End of Unit 3 Assessment Prompt: Draft Newspaper Article: How the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake and Fire Affected the People of San Francisco and invite students to read silently in their head as you read it aloud.
    • Tell students that now they are going to draft their own newspaper articles. Remind students to use all the resources they have collected as a class over the past weeks to write their article. List the resources on the board:

-   The Newspaper Article Criteria anchor chart for support   

-   The authentic newspaper articles they examined in Lesson 7

-   The model newspaper article

-   The Newspaper Article Rubric

    • Tell students they can choose the format they want to use for the newspaper. They can choose how they want to organize the features, as long as each of the features on the anchor chart is included. Invite students to refer to the authentic newspaper articles for ideas.
    • Explain that students will not be including their visual component in their draft, but they should clearly show where it will go and which visual component they have chosen from their caption.
    • Ask them to begin drafting their articles. Remind students that as this is an assessment, they are to work independently writing their newspaper articles.
    • Circulate to support students by reviewing the model with them as an example as needed.
  • Some students may benefit from saying their ideas aloud before they write them down. Organize these students into a group to work with you apart from students who need to work quietly.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Debrief (3 minutes)

    • Ask students to look over their drafts and to discuss in triads:

*   "How do you think you have done? What went well in your drafting? Why?"

*   "What didn't go so well? Why not?"

*   "What do you think you could improve upon? Why?"

  • The debrief after the assessment can help build a culture of achievement in your classroom.

Homework

Homework
  • If you haven't already done so, finish your draft newspaper article.
  • Continue reading your independent reading book.

 

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