Making a Claim: Emma Burke’s Point of View of the Immediate Aftermath of the Earthquake | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M3A:U2:L9

Making a Claim: Emma Burke’s Point of View of the Immediate Aftermath of the Earthquake

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can use evidence from a variety of grade-appropriate texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.6.9)
  • I can apply grade 6 Reading standards to literature (e.g., "Compare and contrast texts in different forms or genres [e.g., stories and poems; historical novels; and fantasy stories] in terms of their approaches to similar themes and topics"). (W.6.9a)

Supporting Targets

  • I can make a claim about Emma Burke's point of view of the immediate aftermath of the earthquake.
  • I can skillfully select the best evidence to support my claim.
  • I can draft the first body paragraph of my literary analysis essay.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Making a Claim Graphic Organizer: Emma Burke's Point of View of the Immediate Aftermath
  • Draft of body paragraph 1 of literary analysis essay

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A.  Receiving Feedback from Mid-Unit 2 Assessment (4 minutes)

B.  Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A.  Comparing Body Paragraph 1 of the Model Literary Analysis against the Rubric (6 minutes)

B.  Modeling Making an Evidence-Based Claim (8 minutes)

C.  Making an Evidence-Based Claim: Emma Burke's Point of View of the Immediate Aftermath (16 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A.  Begin Drafting Body Paragraph 1 (9 minutes)

4.  Homework

A.  Use the resources from today's lesson to support you in completing this draft of body paragraph 1 about Emma Burke's point of view of the immediate aftermath of the earthquake.

  • In Lessons 9-11, students draft their literary analysis essays. Each lesson has a similar structure of direct instruction with the model literary analysis followed by students' work on their own literary analysis essays.
  • To get a clear vision of success, students evaluate the model literary analysis against the New York State Grades 6-8 Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric to scaffold their writing.
  • Part of the New York State Grades 6-8 Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric asks students to "develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, details, quotations, or other information and examples from the text(s)." In this lesson, the focus is describing Emma Burke's point of view of the immediate aftermath and supporting claims about this point of view with evidence. In Lesson 10, students focus on describing Moon Shadow's point of view of the immediate aftermath with evidence. 
  • The Making a Claim Graphic Organizer: Miss Whitlaw's Point of View of Dragons is used for teacher modeling only. Students receive their own copy just so they can follow along.
  • The Making a Claim Graphic Organizer: Emma Burke's Point of View of the Immediate Aftermath helps students analyze how their evidence supports the claim. It also scaffolds the writing of the first body paragraph, which students begin as the Closing of this lesson. They should finish drafting their first body paragraph for homework.
  • A suggested answer key has been provided in the supporting materials for you to reference as you circulate to support students.
  • In advance: Review the model literary analysis and evaluate according to the New York State Grades 6-8 Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric. Consider the support students will need to identify relevant evidence from the model to produce a similar claim in their own literary analysis essay (see Making a Claim Graphic Organizer: Miss Whitlaw's Point of View of Dragons (answers, for teacher reference). Consider pairing students according to the feedback they received on the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment to differentiate and meet their needs as writers.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

skillfully

Materials

  • Mid-Unit 2 Assessments (from Lesson 6)
  • End of Unit 2 Assessment Prompt: Point of View of the Immediate Aftermath Literary Analysis Prompt (from Lesson 7; one per student)
  • Document camera
  • Model literary analysis (from Lesson 7; one per student)
  • Qualities of a Strong Literary Analysis Essay anchor chart (begun in Lesson 8)
  • New York State Grades 6-8 Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric (from Lesson 7; one per student)
  • Equity sticks
  • Making a Claim Graphic Organizer: Miss Whitlaw's Point of View of Dragons (one per student and one to display)
  • Making a Claim Graphic Organizer: Miss Whitlaw's Point of View of Dragons (answers, for teacher reference)
  • Making a Claim Graphic Organizer: Emma Burke's Point of View of the Immediate Aftermath (one per student and one to display)
  • Author's Point of View Graphic Organizer: Immediate Aftermath Excerpt (from Lesson 5)
  • Making a Claim Graphic Organizer: Emma Burke's Point of View of the Immediate Aftermath (answers, for teacher reference)
  • Lined paper (one piece per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A.  Receiving Feedback from Mid-Unit 2 Assessment (4 minutes)

  • Hand back the Mid-Unit 2 Assessments and invite students to spend time reading your feedback.
  • Ask students to write their name on the board if they have questions so that you can follow up either immediately or later in the lesson.
  • Opening the lesson by asking students to share their homework makes them accountable for completing it. It also gives you the opportunity to monitor which students are not doing their homework.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Invite a student to read the learning targets aloud while the other students follow along:

*   "I can make a claim about Emma Burke's point of view of the immediate aftermath."

*   "I can skillfully select the best evidence to support my claim."

*   "I can draft the first body paragraph of my literary analysis essay."

Tell students they will evaluate the model literary analysis according to the rubric first and then begin working on their own essays with a writing graphic organizer.

  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Comparing Body Paragraph 1 of the Model Literary Analysis against the Rubric (6 minutes)

  • Invite students to reread the End of Unit 2 Assessment Prompt: Point of View of the Immediate Aftermath Literary Analysis Prompt to ground themselves in what they are being asked to do.
  • Use a document camera to display the Model Literary Analysis and direct students to reread the copy they annotated in Lesson 7. Explain that the two paragraphs in the middle are the body paragraphs. Invite them to reread the first body paragraph of the essay.
  • Focus students on the description of body paragraph 1 on the Qualities of a Strong Literary Analysis anchor chart.
  • Ask them to discuss in triads:

*   "What is the first claim made in the first body paragraph?"

  • Select volunteers to share their answers with the whole group. Listen for them to explain that the claim is that Miss Whitlaw's point of view is that dragons are wicked.
  • Invite students to take out their New York State Grades 6-8 Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric and evaluate the evidence used to support the first claim in body paragraph 1. Ask triads to discuss:

*   "How does the model literary analysis use relevant evidence to support the first claim?"

*   "How is the evidence connected to the claim?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses. Refer to the model literary analysis to check student responses. Make sure that students have a clear understanding of what makes the evidence in the model meet the criteria of the rubric.
  • Inviting students to compare a model against the rubric can help them to see why the model is strong and therefore is a good example to follow.

B. Modeling Making an Evidence-Based Claim (8 minutes)

  • Display and distribute copies of the Making a Claim graphic organizer: Miss Whitlaw's Point of View of Dragons. Remind students that they have used graphic organizers like this to find evidence to support their claims in previous literary analyses.  This graphic organizer is just a model for students to hold on to, and refer back to when they complete a similar graphic organizer themselves on a different topic.
  • Model how to complete the Making a Claim graphic organizer using body paragraph 1 of the model literary analysis by demonstrating a Think-aloud as you complete the sections of the graphic organizer. Refer to the Making a Claim Graphic Organizer: Miss Whitlaw's Point of View of Dragons (answers, for teacher reference) as necessary. Explain to students that you are going to remind them how to use this graphic organizer.
  • Say, "My answer to the focus question is that Miss Whitlaw's point of view of dragons is that they are evil."
  • Cold call students to provide the supporting evidence from the model literary analysis. Record the evidence on the displayed organizer and ask students to fill in their own copies, so that each student creates a model.
  • Refer to the Making a Claim graphic organizer: Miss Whitlaw's Point of View of Dragons (answers, for teacher reference) as a guide to think aloud how to complete the remaining boxes on the organizer. Invite students to assist you by asking them the questions in each of the boxes. Complete the displayed organizer with appropriate student responses.
  • When reviewing graphic organizers or recording forms, consider using a document camera to display the document for students who struggle with auditory processing.
  • Clear modeling of how to fill out a graphic organizer supports all students in understanding what the content of each part of the organizer should look like, enabling them to work more independently and freeing up the teacher to work with those who are struggling and require additional support.

C. Making an Evidence-Based Claim: Emma Burke's Point of View of the Immediate Aftermath (16 minutes)

  • Refocus students on the assessment prompt, particularly the first bullet:

*   "What is Emma Burke's point of view of the immediate aftermath of the earthquake? Use evidence from the text to support your claim."

  • Display and distribute Making a Claim Graphic Organizer: Emma Burke's Point of View of the Immediate Aftermath and explain that students are going to use the excerpt of text about the immediate aftermath written by Emma Burke and the points of view recorded on their Author's Point of View Graphic Organizer: Immediate Aftermath Excerpt from Lesson 5to fill out their graphic organizer in the same way that you just filled out the displayed model as a whole group.
  • Place students in partnerships based on the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment you handed back in the Opening of the lesson. Invite them to support each other in skillfully selecting the best evidence and putting it in the graphic organizers. Tell them that each student is responsible for completing his or her own organizer.
  • Circulate and support students as they work. Refer to the Making a Claim Graphic Organizer: Emma Burke's Point of View of the Immediate Aftermath (answers, for teacher reference). As needed, support students by asking specific questions like:

*   "What was Emma Burke's point of view of the immediate aftermath? How do you know?"

*   "When you look back over your resources, is there more relevant evidence that you could use to support your claim?"

*   "Are there more details you can add from the text and your own thinking to explain your claim?"

  • Refocus students whole group. Explain that it is important for them to share their work with their peers to help synthesize their thinking before they begin writing their first body paragraph.
  • Invite them to find a new partner with whom they can share their graphic organizers. Encourage them to find a partner who has a similar claim in order to compare their supporting evidence. Not all students may be able to find a partner with the same claim.
  • Ask students to evaluate their partner's claim and supporting evidence against the rubric. Say:

*   "Has the claim been developed with relevant facts, definitions, details, quotations, or other information and examples from the text(s)?"

  • Circulate to support the discussions. Listen for students to push each other to find more relevant evidence connected to their claim.
  • Encourage them to revise their claims or evidence based on their partner collaboration.
  • Graphic organizers and recording forms engage students more actively and provide scaffolding that is especially critical for learners with lower levels of language proficiency and/or learning.
  • Guiding questions provide motivation for student engagement in the topic and give a purpose to reading a text closely.
  • Inviting students to discuss their ideas in pairs before they record anything on their graphic organizers can help to ensure that all students are engaged in the thinking process. It can also provide additional support to ELLs.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Begin Drafting Body Paragraph 1 (9 minutes)

  • Congratulate students for all their hard work making claims and organizing evidence from the texts. Explain that now it is time for them to begin writing their first body paragraph using all of the resources they have been working with in this lesson.
  • Distribute lined paper. Remind students of the expectations for quiet writing time. Explain that they have had several opportunities to talk about Emma Burke's point of view of the immediate aftermath of the earthquake. Now the focus is on working independently to draft a quality literary analysis essay.
  • Circulate to provide additional support to those students who might need it.
  • Some students may benefit from saying sentences aloud before writing them down. Consider seating those students together in the same area so that you can circulate to support each one as they write.

Homework

Homework
  • Use the resources from today's lesson to support you in completing this draft of body paragraph 1 about Emma Burke's point of view of the immediate aftermath of the earthquake.

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