Reading for Gist and Analyzing Point of View: Moon Shadow | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M3A:U2:L8

Reading for Gist and Analyzing Point of View: Moon Shadow

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can determine an author's point of view or purpose in an informational text. (RI.6.6)

Supporting Targets

  • I can analyze the structure of a model literary essay.
  • I can identify Moon Shadow's point of view in an excerpt of Dragonwings.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Structured notes
  • Qualities of a Strong Literary Analysis Essay anchor chart
  • Analyzing Moon Shadow's Point of View of the Immediate Aftermath graphic organizer

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Reader: Chapter 11 of Dragonwings (6 minutes)

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Analyzing the Structure of the Model Literary Analysis (10 minutes)

B. Analyzing Moon Shadow's Point of View of the Immediate Aftermath (19 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Triad Discussion: Similarities and Differences between the Points of View of Emma Burke and Moon Shadow (8 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Read Chapter 12 of Dragonwings and the afterword. Use evidence flags to identify three text details, then answer the focus question in your structured notes, using text evidence.

  • In this lesson, students help create an anchor chart of the structure of a literary analysis essay based on the model literary analysis.
  • The language to use on the anchor chart comes directly from the New York State Grades 6-8 Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric and the writing prompt distributed in Lesson 7. Students will use the rubric in Lessons 9-11 to self-assess their writing.
  • In this lesson, students analyze Moon Shadow's point of view of the immediate aftermath of the earthquake, using a similar graphic organizer to the one they have been using to analyze Emma Burke's point of view in the first half of the unit.
  • In the suggested answers for teacher reference, there are many quotes listed in the second column. Students may not identify all of these quotes. As many possibilities as possible have been provided for you as a guide, but this is not the expectation for students.
  • In advance: Review the anchor chart and the Analyzing Moon Shadow's Point of View of the Immediate Aftermath graphic organizer (see supporting materials).
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

structure

Materials

  • End of Unit 2 Assessment Prompt: Point of View of the Immediate Aftermath Literary Analysis Prompt (from Lesson 7; one per student)
  • Model literary analysis (from Lesson 7; one per student)
  • Qualities of a Strong Literary Analysis Essay anchor chart (new, co-created with students in Work Time A)
  • Dragonwings (book; one per student)
  • Analyzing Moon Shadow's Point of View of the Immediate Aftermath of the Earthquake (one per student and one for display)
  • Document camera
  • Analyzing Moon Shadow's Point of View of the Immediate Aftermath of the Earthquake (answers, for teacher reference)
  • Author's Purpose anchor chart (begun in Lesson 3)
  • Author's Purpose anchor chart (answers, for teacher reference)
  • Author's Point of View Graphic Organizer: Immediate Aftermath Excerpt (from Lesson 5)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Chapter 11 of Dragonwings (6 minutes)

  • Remind students that for homework they were to read Chapter 11 of Dragonwings. Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

*   "What happens in Chapter 11?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses with the whole group. Listen for them to explain that Moon Shadow and Windrider moved to a new place and had a tough few years. They built Dragonwings during this time, and then Black Dog came and stole all of their money.
  • Remind students of the focus question:

*"This chapter ends with the line, 'There was some beauty to life after all, even if it was only the beauty of hope.' In this chapter, what gives Moon Shadow hope and something to believe in?"

-   Invite students to share their answers to the question from their structured notes with the rest of their triad.

-   Select volunteers to share their answer with the whole group.

  • Opening the lesson by asking students to share their homework makes them accountable for completing it. It also gives you the opportunity to monitor which students are not doing their homework.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Invite students to read the learning targets with you:

*   "I can analyze the structure of a model literary analysis essay."

*   "I can identify Moon Shadow's point of view in an excerpt of Dragonwings."

  • Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "What is the structure? If you are going to analyze the structure in a piece of writing, what are you going to be looking for?"

Select volunteers to share their responses. Listen for students to explain that the structure is the way the writing has been put together.

  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Analyzing the Structure of the Model Literary Analysis (10 minutes)

  • Remind students that in the previous lesson, they unpacked the End of Unit 2 Assessment Prompt: Point of View of the Immediate Aftermath Literary Analysis Prompt and identified the main ideas of the Model Literary Analysis.
  • Invite them to reread the assessment prompt to ground themselves in what they are being asked to do.
  • Ask students to review their gist statements from their annotated model literary analysis. Explain that their gist statements will help them identify the structure and qualities of a strong literary analysis essay.
  • Ask triads to discuss:

*   "What is the structure of a strong literary analysis essay?"

*   "What are the qualities of a strong literary analysis essay?"

  • Begin the Qualities of a Strong Literary Analysis Essay anchor chart. Cold call triads to share the structure and qualities they discussed that make a strong literary analysis essay.
  • As students share their answers, put them into language from the rubric and prompt. Be sure the chart includes:

-   Introductory paragraph--introduces what the essay will be about

-   Body paragraph 1--describes Miss Whitlaw's point of view of dragons

-   Body paragraph 2--describes Moon Shadow's point of view of dragons

-   Concluding paragraph--summarizes the content of the essay and answers the question: How do the different cultures and backgrounds of Miss Whitlaw and Moon Shadow affect their points of view of dragons?

  • For anything students do not identify on their own, add it to the anchor chart and explain why you are adding it.
  • A model essay provides a framework that students can replicate to structure their own thinking to answer a similar question.
  • Anchor charts collect whole-group thinking for reference later on.

B. Analyzing Moon Shadow's Point of View of the Immediate Aftermath (19 minutes)

  • Congratulate students for creating an anchor chart that will guide them through this writing process.
  • Tell students that they will now reread an excerpt of the novel Dragonwings (pages 198-204) to analyze Moon Shadow's point of view of the immediate aftermath of the earthquake.
  • Distribute Analyzing Moon Shadow's Point of View of the Immediate Aftermath of the Earthquake. Invite students to read through the directions and the column headings of the graphic organizer with you. Remind them that this graphic organizer is very similar to the one they have been filling out for the Emma Burke excerpts in the first half of the unit, but this time they don't have to analyze how Moon Shadow conveys his point of view, as that isn't relevant to the content of their essay.
  • Invite students to work in triads to fill in the graphic organizer. Remind them to discuss ideas in their triads before recording anything.
  • Circulate to support students as they work. Ask guiding questions:

* "What is his point of view here? How do you know?"

* "What in the text suggests this point of view?"

  • Invite students to pair up with someone from another triad to share their answers and to make revisions where they think necessary.
  • Select students to share whole group. Use a document camera to display a blank Analyzing Moon Shadow's Point of View of the Immediate Aftermath organizer and fill it with appropriate student responses. Invite students to revise or add to their own graphic organizers. Refer to the Analyzing Moon Shadow's Point of View of the Immediate Aftermath of the Earthquake (answers, for teacher reference) to guide students in what they should have recorded.
  • Graphic organizers and recording forms engage students more actively and provide scaffolding that is especially critical for learners with lower levels of language proficiency and/or learning.
  • Inviting students to discuss their ideas in triads before they record anything on their graphic organizers can help to ensure that all students are engaged in the thinking process. It can also provide additional support to ELLs.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Triad Discussion: Similarities and Differences between Points of View of Emma Burke and Moon Shadow (8 minutes)

  • Ask triads to discuss:

* "What is an author's purpose in a novel? So what is Laurence Yep's purpose in Dragonwings and in this excerpt?"

  • Select volunteers to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that an author's purpose in a novel is to entertain us by telling us a story that we want to keep reading, so Laurence Yep's purpose is to entertain us by telling a story that we want to keep reading. Record this in the first column on the Author's Purpose anchor chart. See Author's Purpose anchor chart (answers, for teacher reference).
  • Ask triads to discuss:

* "So how does that affect the narrator's point of view?"

  • Cold call students to share their ideas. Listen for them to explain that Moon Shadow's point of view appeals to our emotions by focusing on the people in the immediate aftermath of the earthquake and how he felt about what he saw. Record this in the second column on the Author's Purpose anchor chart.
  • Invite students to refer to their Author's Point of View Graphic Organizer: Immediate Aftermath Excerpt completed in Lesson 5.Remind them that they already identified Emma Burke's point of view of the immediate aftermath on this assessment. Ask students to compare the two graphic organizers (from Lesson 5 and the one they completed in this lesson) to discuss in triads:

*   "How is Emma Burke's point of view similar to Moon Shadow's?"

*   "How is Emma Burke's point of view different from Moon Shadow's?"

*   "Think about the end of unit assessment prompt question about how author's purpose affects the narrator's point of view in each of the texts. Look at the Author's Purpose anchor chart. Why do you think their points of view are different?"

  • Select volunteers to share their discussions with the whole group. These are only preliminary thinking ideas, so don't expect students to know the answer to this question immediately. Listen for them to explain that Emma Burke was writing an informational text to inform people about her experiences of the earthquake, whereas Laurence Yep is writing to entertain the reader and draw them into the story. This results in Emma Burke focusing on providing details about physical destruction and the significant events she witnessed, while Laurence Yep tries to draw us in emotionally by having Moon Shadow's point of view of the immediate aftermath of the earthquake focused on things that will appeal to the reader's emotions, like the people and their suffering.

Homework

Homework
  • Read Chapter 12 of Dragonwings and the afterword. Use evidence flags to identify three text details, then answer the focus question below in your structured notes, using text evidence:

*   "Give this chapter a new title. Use evidence flags to identify three details in the story that guided you to this title."

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