Analyzing Author’s Point of View: Immediate Aftermath Excerpt of “Comprehending the Calamity” | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M3A:U2:L5

Analyzing Author’s Point of View: Immediate Aftermath Excerpt of “Comprehending the Calamity”

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can determine an author's point of view or purpose in an informational text. (RI.6.6)
  • I can explain how an author's point of view is conveyed in an informational text. (RI.6.6)

Supporting Targets

  • I can identify Emma Burke's point of view of the immediate aftermath of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake.
  • I can explain how Emma Burke conveys her point of view of the immediate aftermath the 1906 San Francisco earthquake.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Author's Point of View Graphic Organizer: Immediate Aftermath Excerpt

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Reader: Second Half of Chapter 9 of Dragonwings (8 minutes)

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Analyzing the Author's Point of View of the Immediate Aftermath (20 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Analyzing How the Author Conveys Her Point of View (15 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Continue Reading Dragonwings and Answer Focus Questions, using structured notes. Read pages 223-236 of Chapter 10 of Dragonwings, stopping at, "All in all, it was a fine evening and we were sorry it had to come to an end." Use evidence flags to identify text details, then answer the focus question in your structured notes using text evidence.

 

  • This is the second in the two-lesson cycle started in the Lesson 4. In this lesson, students analyze the same excerpt they read for gist in the previous lesson to identify Emma Burke's point of view of the immediate aftermath of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. They then identify how she has conveyed her point of view.
  • Remind students at appropriate points throughout the lesson that the activities in Lessons 2-5 will support their success on the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment in Lesson 6.
  • In advance: Read the immediate aftermath excerpt of "Comprehending the Calamity" (see Lesson 4) and consider Emma Burke's point of view of the immediate aftermath of the earthquake and how she conveys it. See the Author's Point of View: Immediate Aftermath Excerpt (answers, for teacher reference) in supporting materials.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

point of view, convey

Materials

  • Equity sticks
  • Document camera
  • Author's Point of View Graphic Organizer: Immediate Aftermath Excerpt (one per student and one for display)
  • Author's Point of View Graphic Organizer: Immediate Aftermath Excerpt (answers, for teacher reference)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Second Half of Chapter 9 of Dragonwings (8 minutes)

  • Remind students that for homework they read the second half of Chapter 9 of Dragonwings. Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "What happens in this part of Chapter 9?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses with the whole group. Listen for students to explain that it is about the aftermath of the earthquake: Moon Shadow, his father, Robin, and Miss Whitlaw try to help people, but a fire quickly spreads across the city and they all have to move to Golden Gate Park.
  • Remind students of the point of view focus question that they answered for homework.

*   "How does Yep help you, the reader, experience what it was like to live through this big event?"

  • Mix and Mingle:

-   Play music and invite students to move around the room.

-   Tell students that when you stop the music, they are to use their structured notes to share their answer with the person closest to them.

-   Repeat three times.

Use equity sticks to select students to share their answers with the whole group.

  • Opening the lesson by asking students to share their homework makes them accountable for completing it. It also gives you the opportunity to monitor which students are not doing their homework.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Invite students to read the learning targets with you:

*   "I can identify Emma Burke's point of view of the immediate aftermath of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake."

*   "I can explain how Emma Burke conveys her point of view of the immediate aftermath of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake."

  • Remind students of what point of view means. Ask them to Think-Pair-Share:

*   "What are the different points of view that an author can write from?"

  • Consider using equity sticks to select students to share their responses. Listen for students to explain that an author can write from first person (I), third person (he, she), or third person omniscient.
  • Remind students that the word convey means communicate, so they are going to consider how Emma Burke communicates her point of view to the reader.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.

 

  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Analyzing the Author's Point of View of the Immediate Aftermath (20 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the document camera. Display and distribute the Author's Point of View Graphic Organizer: Immediate Aftermath Excerpt.
  • Focus students' attention on the first paragraph of the immediate aftermath excerpt and invite them to reread it. Ask students to discuss in triads:

*    "What is Emma Burke's point of view of the immediate aftermath of the earthquake?"

  • Select volunteers to share their responses. Record ideas on the displayed graphic organizer. Refer to Author's Point of View Graphic Organizer: Immediate Aftermath Excerpt (answers, for teacher reference) as needed to guide students toward suggested answers.
  • Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "How do you know? What words or phrases support this claim?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses. Record ideas on the displayed organizer.
  • Invite students to work in triads to reread the rest of the excerpt, analyze it, and fill in their graphic organizer with Emma Burke's point of view of the earthquake. Remind students to discuss their ideas in their triads before they fill out the organizer. Tell students to ignore the third column of the organizer for now, as they will come back to that later.
  • Circulate to assist students with rereading the excerpt and analyzing it for the author's point of view. As you circulate ask students:

*   "What does Emma Burke think of the immediate aftermath of the earthquake?"

*   "How do you know? What evidence can you find of this point of view in the text?"

*   "What words or phrases does she use to convey her point of view?"

  • Refocus whole group. Select volunteers to share their thinking and record appropriate responses on the displayed organizer. 
  • Graphic organizers and recording forms engage students more actively and provide the necessary scaffolding that is especially critical for learners with lower levels of language proficiency and/or learning.
  • When reviewing graphic organizers or recording forms, consider using a document camera to display the document for students who struggle with auditory processing.
  • Guiding questions provide motivation for student engagement with the topic, and give a purpose to reading a text closely.
  • Inviting students to discuss their ideas in triads before they record anything on their graphic organizers can help to ensure that all students are engaged in the thinking process. It can also provide additional support to ELL students.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Analyzing How the Author Conveys Her Point of View (15 minutes)

  • Tell students that now that they have identified Emma Burke's point of view of the immediate aftermath of the earthquake, they are going to think about how she conveys that point of view, just as they did with the excerpt in Lesson 3.
  • Refer to the example recorded on the displayed organizer and ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "So how does she convey the point of view that looking pretty was no longer a priority?"

*   "Does she state it directly? Is it inferred from her descriptions of her actions? Or in her descriptions of the actions of others? Is it inferred from her use of language?"

  • Select volunteers to share their ideas and record appropriate responses on the displayed graphic organizer.
  • Invite students to work in triads to do the same with the other claims they have made about Emma Burke's point of view.
  •  Circulate to assist students with determining how Emma Burke conveyed her point of view. As you circulate, ask:

*   "How does she convey that point of view? What techniques has she used in her writing to convey her point of view?"

*   "Does she state it directly? Is it inferred from her descriptions of her actions? Is it inferred from her use of language?"

  • Refocus whole group. Use equity sticks to select volunteers to share their ideas and record appropriate responses on the displayed graphic organizer.
  • Remind students that they will complete the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment in the next lesson, which will be very much like the activities in Lessons 2-5.

Homework

Homework
  • Read pages 223-236 of Chapter 10 of Dragonwings, stopping at, "All in all, it was a fine evening and we were sorry it had to come to an end." Use evidence flags to identify text details, then answer the focus question below in your structured notes using text evidence:

*   How does Moon Shadow view the demons after the earthquake?

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