Analyzing Author’s Point of View: Earthquake Excerpt of “Comprehending the Calamity” | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M3A:U2:L3

Analyzing Author’s Point of View: Earthquake Excerpt of “Comprehending the Calamity”

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can determine an author's point of view or purpose in an informational text. (RI.6.6)
  • I can explain how an author's point of view is conveyed in an informational text. (RI.6.6)

Supporting Targets

  • I can identify Emma Burke's point of view of the earthquake.
  • I can explain how Emma Burke conveys her point of view of the earthquake.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Author's Point of View Graphic Organizer: Earthquake Excerpt

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Reader: Chapter 8 of Dragonwings (8 minutes)

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Analyzing the Author's Point of View of the Earthquake (20 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Analyzing How the Author Conveys Her Point of View (15 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Read Dragonwings, Chapter 9: "The Dragon Wakes," pages 189-206, stopping at, "... while Father picked up his hats, dusted them off, and set them on his head one by one." Use evidence flags to identify three text details from Chapter 9, then answer the focus question in your structured notes using text evidence.

 

 

  • This is the second in the two-lesson cycle started in the Lesson 2. Students analyze the same excerpt they read for the gist in the previous lesson: the earthquake excerpt of "Comprehending the Calamity." In this lesson, students identify Emma Burke's point of view of the earthquake. They then identify how she conveyed her point of view.
  • Remind students at appropriate points throughout the lesson that the activities in Lessons 2-5 will support their success on the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment in Lesson 6.
  • In advance: Read the earthquake excerpt of "Comprehending the Calamity" (see Lesson 2) and consider Emma Burke's point of view of the earthquake and how she conveys it. See Author's Point of View: Earthquake Excerpt (answers, for teacher reference) in supporting materials.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

point of view, conveys

Materials

  • Equity sticks
  • Document camera
  • Author's Point of View Graphic Organizer: Earthquake Excerpt (one per student and one for display)
  • Author's Point of View Graphic Organizer: Earthquake Excerpt (answers, for teacher reference)
  • Author's Purpose anchor chart (new; teacher-created; see supporting materials)
  • Author's Purpose anchor chart (answers, for teacher reference)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Chapter 8 of Dragonwings (8 minutes)

  • Remind students that for homework they read Chapter 8 of Dragonwings. Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "What happens in Chapter 8?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses with the whole group. Listen for students to explain that Moon Shadow and Windrider invite Robin and Miss Whitlaw to fly their glider at the beach. Robin gives Moon Shadow some advice and he stands up to Jack and earns the respect of the boys in the neighborhood. Windrider tells a story of the constellations and shares his Chinese culture, but the text also shows how he misses his wife back in China.
  • Remind students of the homework focus question.

*   "Throughout this whole chapter, the Tang culture and the demon culture intermix as the characters do things together. What are some things the characters learn they have in common as human beings, regardless of their different cultures?"

  • Invite students to share the evidence they recorded on their structured notes in their triads.
  • Consider using equity sticks to select students to share their evidence with the whole group.
  • Opening the lesson by asking students to share their homework makes them accountable for completing it. It also gives you the opportunity to monitor which students are not doing their homework.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Invite students to read the learning targets with you:

* "I can identify Emma Burke's point of view of the earthquake."

* "I can explain how Emma Burke conveys her point of view of the earthquake."

  • Remind students that they did a lot of work analyzing Moon Shadow's point of view in Unit 1. Also remind them what point of view means. Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

*   "What are the different points of view that an author can write from?"

  • Consider using equity sticks to select students to share their responses. Listen for students to explain that an author can write from first person (I), third person (he, she), or third person omniscient.
  • Remind students that the word convey means communicate, so they are going to consider how Emma Burke communicates her point of view to the reader.
  • Remind students of how Moon Shadow conveys his point of view. Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

*   "How do we know Moon Shadow's point of view? How is his point of view conveyed?"

  • Select volunteers to share their responses. Listen for students to explain that Moon Shadow's point of view is conveyed through his thoughts, words, and actions, and through the words and actions of others in the novel.
  • Tell students that since "Comprehending the Calamity" is a nonfiction text, the point of view may be conveyed differently from Moon Shadow's point of view in the novel.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Analyzing the Author's Point of View of the Earthquake (20 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the document camera. Display and distribute Author's Point of View Graphic Organizer: Earthquake Excerpt. Ask:

*    "What do you notice?"

*   "What do you wonder?"

  • Cold call students to share their ideas with the whole group.
  • Point out that this organizer is very similar to the graphic organizer they filled out in Unit 1 and tell students they will fill it out in the same way. Point out that the final column about tone is gone and instead the final column is about how Emma Burke conveys her point of view.
  • Focus students' attention on the first paragraph of the earthquake excerpt and invite them to reread it. Ask students to discuss in triads:

*    "What is Emma Burke's point of view of the earthquake?"

  • Select volunteers to share their responses. Record ideas on the displayed organizer. Refer to Author's Point of View Graphic Organizer: Earthquake Excerpt (answers, for teacher reference) as needed to guide students toward suggested answers.
  • Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "How do you know? What words or phrases support this claim?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses. Record ideas on the displayed organizer.  
  • Invite students to work in triads to reread the rest of the excerpt, analyze it, and fill in their graphic organizer with Emma Burke's point of view of the earthquake. Remind students to discuss their ideas in their triads before they fill out the organizer. Tell students to ignore the third column of the organizer for now, as they will come back to that later.
  • Circulate to assist students with rereading the excerpt and analyzing it for the author's point of view. As you circulate, ask:

*   "What does Emma Burke think of the earthquake?"

*   "How do you know? What evidence can you find of this point of view in the text?"

*   "What words or phrases does she use to convey her point of view?"

  • Refocus whole group. Select volunteers to share their thinking and record appropriate responses on the displayed graphic organizer.
  • Graphic organizers and recording forms engage students more actively and provide the necessary scaffolding that is especially critical for learners with lower levels of language proficiency and/or learning.
  • When reviewing graphic organizers or recording forms, consider using a document camera to display the document for students who struggle with auditory processing.
  • Guiding questions provide motivation for student engagement with the topic, and give a purpose to reading a text closely.
  • Inviting students to discuss their ideas in triads before they record anything on their graphic organizers can help to ensure that all students are engaged in the thinking process. It can also provide additional support to ELL students.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Analyzing How the Author Conveys Her Point of View (15 minutes)

  • Tell students that now they have identified Emma Burke's point of view of the earthquake, they are going to think about how she conveys that point of view--just as they did with Moon Shadow.
  • Refer to the example recorded on the displayed organizer and ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "So how does she convey the point of view that it was such a big disaster it was difficult to understand?"

*   "Does she state it directly? Is it inferred from her descriptions of her actions? Is it inferred from her use of language?"

  • Select volunteers to share their ideas and record appropriate responses on the displayed graphic organizer.
  • Invite students to work in triads to do the same with the other claims they have made about Emma Burke's point of view.
  •  Circulate to assist students with determining how Emma Burke conveyed her point of view. As you circulate, ask:

*   "How does she convey that point of view? What techniques has she used in her writing to convey her point of view?"

*   "Does she state it directly? Is it inferred from her descriptions of her actions? Is it inferred from her use of language?"

  • Refocus whole group. Use equity sticks to select volunteers to share their ideas and record appropriate responses on the displayed graphic organizer.
  • Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "Now you have read the first excerpt and analyzed it for point of view, what do you think was Emma Burke's purpose in writing this text?"

  • Select volunteers to share their responses with the whole group. Listen for students to say that her purpose was to inform readers about the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. Emphasize that it is an informational text, so the primary purpose of it is to inform. Record responses in the first column on the Author's Purpose anchor chart. Refer to the Author's Purpose anchor chart (answers, for teacher reference).
  • Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "How do you think that affects her point of view?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses. Listen for students to explain that we have to infer some of her point of view. It isn't always stated directly because she is trying to give more factual details than reveal too much about how she felt about what was happening. Record this in the second column of the Author's Purpose anchor chart.

Homework

Homework
  • Read Dragonwings, Chapter 9: "The Dragon Wakes," pages 189-206, stopping at, "... while Father picked up his hats, dusted them off, and set them on his head one by one." Use evidence flags to identify three text details from Chapter 9, then answer the focus question in your structured notes using text evidence:

*   "The dragon wakes" is a metaphor for a big event in this chapter. What is the event? How do Moon Shadow's beliefs about dragons help him to understand what is happening?

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