End of Unit 2 Assessment: Final Literary Analysis | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M3A:U2:L14

End of Unit 2 Assessment: Final Literary Analysis

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can use correct capitalization, punctuation, and spelling to send a clear message to my reader. (L.6.2)
  • I can use punctuation (commas, parentheses, dashes) to set off nonrestrictive/parenthetical elements. (L.6.2a)
  • I can spell correctly. (L.6.2b)

 

Supporting Targets

  • I can use the NYS Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric to provide kind, specific, and helpful feedback to my peers.
  • I can use teacher feedback to revise my argument essay to further meet the expectations of the NYS Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric.

Ongoing Assessment

  • End of Unit 2 Assessment: Final Draft of Literary Analysis Essay

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A.  Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A.  Language Mini Lesson: Capitalization and Punctuation (10 minutes)

B.  Peer Critique of Draft Literary Analysis Essays (10 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A.  Writing Final Literary Analysis (23 minutes)

4.  Homework

A.  If you didn't finish writing your final literary analysis, do so for homework. Be prepared to return it at the beginning of the next lesson.

  • This lesson is an opportunity for students to review and revise their essays to meet the expectations of the New York State Grades 6-8 Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric.
  • In advance, be sure to have reviewed students' first drafts (from Lesson 11) against Row 2 of the rubric. Give specific positive feedback for at least one thing each student did well. Provide at least one specific area of focus for each student for revision.
  • This lesson includes 5 minutes to address common mistakes you noticed while reviewing student essays. A sample structure is provided here. Focus the lesson on one specific common convention error you noticed as you assessed students' drafts.
  • Some students may need more help with revising than others. There is space for this during the revision time.
  • Some students may not finish their final draft during this lesson. Consider whether to allow them to finish their essays at home and hand them in at the beginning of the next lesson.
  • In advance: Ensure student draft essays have been assessed with teacher feedback in preparation for this lesson. Give specific positive feedback for at least one thing each student did well. Provide at least one specific area of focus for each student for revision.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

peer critique, conventions, comprehension, hinder

 

Materials

  • End of Unit 2 Assessment Prompt: Point of View of the Immediate Aftermath Literary Analysis (from Lesson 7; one per student)
  • Students' draft essays (from Lesson 11)
  • Self-assessment using criteria in Rows 1 and 3 of the rubric (completed in Lesson 11)
  • Peer Critique Guidelines
  • New York State Grades 6-8 Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric (distributed in Lesson 7)
  • Stars and Steps recording form (one per student)
  • Materials for student writing (computers or lined paper)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Invite students to read the learning targets with you:
  • "I can use the NYS Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric to provide kind, specific, and helpful feedback to my peers."
  • "I can use the NYS Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric to help my partner improve control of conventions in his or her essay."
  • Remind students of what conventions refer to--Standard English capitalization, punctuation, spelling, and grammar/usage.  Tell students that they will focus on capitalization, punctuation, and spelling in this lesson.
  • Ask students to discuss in triads:
  • "Given what you have been learning from looking at the model essay and the rubric, and from planning your own essay, what do you want to focus on as you revise?"
  • Emphasize that writing well is hard, and revision is important to make one's message as clear as possible for one's readers. Encourage students and thank them in advance for showing persistence and stamina. Revising can be difficult, but it is one of the things that can help make a good essay great.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A.  Language Mini Lesson: Capitalization and Punctuation (10 minutes)

  • Distribute the End of Unit 2 Assessment Prompt: Point of View of the Immediate Aftermath Literary Analysis (from Lesson 7). Remind students that today is their opportunity to write their final draft. Address any clarifying questions.
  • Return students' draft essays from Lesson 11, as well as their self-assessment using criteria in Rows 1 and 3 of the rubric. Invite them to spend a few minutes looking through the feedback they have been given.
  • Tell students you noticed a common error in their essays relevant to the rubric (for instance, comma splices or inconsistent capitalization).
  • Display an example of the error. Explain why it is incorrect.
  • Model how to revise and correct the error.
  • Check for understanding. Ask students to give you a thumbs-up if they understand the error and how to fix it when revising, or a thumbs-down if they don't understand fully.
  • If many students give a thumbs-down, show another example of the error. Ask students to think about how to fix it.
  • Cold call a student to suggest how to correct it. If the answer is incorrect, clarify. Again ask students to give you a thumbs-up or thumbs-down. If some students are still struggling, consider checking in with them individually.
  • Invite students to revise their draft essays to reflect their learning from the mini lesson.
  • The use of leading questions on student essays helps struggling students understand what areas they should improve before submitting their essay again.

B. Peer Critique of Draft Literary Analysis Essays (10 minutes)

  • Remind students that a peer critique is when we look over someone else's work and provide feedback. Explain that peer critiquing must be done carefully because we want to be helpful to our peers so they can use our suggestions to improve their work. We don't want to make them feel bad. Post the Peer Critique Guidelines and invite students to read them with you.
  • Display the New York State Grades 6-8 Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric and ask students to refer to their own copies.
  • Focus students on the fourth row, Control of Conventions. In Column 3, highlight/underline this section: "Demonstrates grade-appropriate command of conventions with occasional errors that do not hinder comprehension." Ask students to define comprehension and hinder. Ensure they know that to "hinder comprehension" means to get in the way of understanding what is written.
  • Emphasize that their job is to make sure that their peers' writing shows that they know the rules for capitalization and punctuation. Distinguish peer critique from proofreading; they are focusing on convention errors that make the ideas confusing, misleading, or very distracting. It is fine if they catch small errors in each other's work. But the goal is to make the thinking in the writing as strong as possible.
  • Tell students that they will present feedback in the form of stars and steps. Remind them that they have done this in the first module. Today they will give one "star" and one "step" based on Row 4 of the rubric. Remind students that conventions make the reading experience smoother and the ideas easier to understand, so they should pay attention to when the essay is confusing and when it is not as confusing.
  • Briefly model how to give "kind, specific, helpful" stars. Be sure to connect your comments directly to the rubric. For example: "You have capitalized the names of people and sources consistently, which makes the reading very clear." If students have trouble articulating how a peer has mastered conventions, suggest that they find a section that is especially smooth to read and highlight how easy it was to understand the student's ideas without having to figure out what the writer means.
  • Repeat, briefly modeling how to give "kind, specific, helpful" steps. For example: "Would punctuation to make this sentence read more smoothly?" If students have trouble articulating exactly which convention might be helpful, suggest they ask a general question about a part that confused them or forced them to reread.
  • Emphasize that it is especially important to be kind when giving steps. Asking a question of the writer is often a good way to do this: "I wonder if ...?" "Have you thought about ...?"  "I'm not sure what you meant by ..."
  • Distribute the Stars and Steps recording form. Explain that today, students will record a star and step for their partner on this sheet so that their partner can remember the feedback he or she receives. They are to write the name of their partner at the top of their paper.
  • Pair up students. Distribute the draft essays. Invite pairs to swap essays and to spend 3 minutes reading them in silence.
  • Ask students to record a star and step for their partner on the recording form. This form is designed to help them remember the feedback they want to give to their partner from the peer critique. Circulate to assist students who may struggle with articulating or recording their feedback.
  • Ask students to return the essay and Stars and Steps recording form to their partner and to explain the star and step they recorded for their partner. Invite students to question their partners where they don't understand the star or step they have been given.
  • Set up peer critiquing carefully to ensure students feel safe giving and receiving feedback. Students must be given a set of clear guidelines for behavior, and they need to see the teacher model how to do it successfully. Asking students to provide feedback to their peers based on explicit criteria benefits both parties in clarifying what a strong piece of writing should look like. Students can learn from both the strengths and weaknesses that they notice in the work of peers.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Writing Final Literary Analysis (23 minutes)

  • Invite students to apply the stars and steps from the peer critique and the teacher feedback on their draft to write their final literary analysis.
  • Circulate around the room, addressing questions. Consider checking in first with students who need extra support to make sure they can use their time well.
  • Collect essays and drafts from students who have finished by the end of the lesson. Invite those who haven't finished to take them home and return them the following lesson.

Homework

Homework
  • If you didn't finish writing your final literary analysis, do so for homework. Be prepared to return it at the beginning of the next lesson.

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