Researching Facts | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M3A:U2:L13

Researching Facts

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can write informative/explanatory texts that convey ideas and concepts using relevant information that is carefully selected and organized. (W.6.2)
  • I can conduct short research projects to answer a question. (W.6.7)

Supporting Targets

  • I can research to find factual information to use in my newspaper article.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Researching Factual Information graphic organizer

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A. Unpacking the Learning Target (3 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Analyzing the Factual Information in the Model Newspaper Article (10 minutes)

B. Researching Facts: Part 1 of the Jigsaw (20 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Triad Share: Part 2 of the Jigsaw (12 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Continue reading your independent reading book.

  • In this lesson, students work in triads to research factual information about the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire to use as a basis for their newspaper articles. This is done in a jigsaw, so each triad is given a different research article and they partner up with another triad at the end to share what they have found.
  • In advance: Prepare the research materials for each triad (see supporting materials. Each triad needs one research article, and you must have enough of each article for one per student. The articles provided are of a range of levels, so determine how to allocate the articles by considering the reading level of students in each triad. In addition to the article, each triad needs a glossary for their article.
  • Post: Learning target.

Vocabulary

factual information

Materials

  • Performance Task Prompt for the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire (from Lesson 1)
  • Model newspaper article: "Sandy wreaks havoc across Northeast; at least 11 dead" (from Lesson 12)
  • Model newspaper article factual information (for teacher reference only)
  • Newspaper Article Criteria anchor chart (from Lesson 12)
  • Researching Factual Information graphic organizer (one per student and one to display)
  • Research articles and glossaries (each triad should be allocated an article; see Teaching Note above)

-   The Great 1906 Earthquake and Fires of San Francisco (and glossary)

-   Timeline of the San Francisco Earthquake, April 18-23, 1906 (and glossary)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Unpacking the Learning Target (3 minutes)

  • Invite students to read the learning targets with you:

*   "I can research to find factual information to use in my newspaper article."

  • Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "What is factual information?"

  • Select volunteers to share their ideas. Listen for them to explain that factual information is information that is indisputable--it is definitely true and there is no arguing against it. Explain that the who, what, where, when, and why are usually compiled from factual information.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Reviewing the key academic vocabulary in learning targets can prepare students for vocabulary they may encounter in the lesson.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Analyzing the Factual Information in the Model Newspaper Article (10 minutes)

  • Invite students to reread the Performance Task Prompt for the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire. Focus on the overarching question (How did the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire affect the people of San Francisco?) and the bullet that says the newspaper article must contain factual information.
  • Display the model newspaper article: "Sandy wreaks havoc across Northeast; at least 11 dead." Ask students to reread it to remind themselves of what it is about.
  • Tell students they are going to work in triads underlining the factual information--the information that is definitely true.
  • Model this on the displayed newspaper article. Invite students to reread the first paragraph. Ask:

*   "Which information in this first paragraph is factual information? Which information is definitely true and cannot be denied or argued against?"

  • Select volunteers to share their responses. Listen for students to explain that "no longer a hurricane," "Jersey Shore on Monday," and "killing at least 11 people from West Virginia to North Carolina and Connecticut" are all facts. They are things that are undeniably true. Underline those facts on the displayed model newspaper article.
  • Invite students to work in triads doing the same thing with the rest of the article, marking up their own copies.
  • Circulate to support triads. Ask guiding questions:

*   "Is this factual information? Is it something that is undeniably true?"

  • Refocus the whole group. Cold call students to share with the class those facts their triads underlined. Underline appropriate responses on the displayed article. Refer to the model newspaper article factual information (for teacher reference only) to guide students toward how it should look.
  • Ask students to look over all of the facts and discuss in their triads:

*   "Why have these facts been included? Why does the reader need to know them?"

*   "How much of the article is factual information?"

  • Select volunteers to share their responses with the whole group. Listen for students to explain that the facts have been included to inform the reader about the destruction that Hurricane Sandy caused and that the majority of the article is factual information.
  • Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "So what can you learn from this for planning your newspaper articles about the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that their newspaper articles must include a lot of facts to inform the reader.
  • Point out the word "Objective" (unbiased) on the Newspaper Article Criteria anchor chart (from Lesson 12).Tell students that by including a lot of factual information that is undeniably true, they can help keep their newspaper articles objective.
  • Ask students:

*   "So how are you going to get these facts?"

Select volunteers to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that they need to research to find out facts about the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire.

  • Graphic organizers and recording forms engage students more actively and provide the necessary scaffolding that is especially critical for students with lower levels of language proficiency and/or learning.
  • When reviewing the graphic organizers or recording forms, consider using a document camera to display the document for students who struggle with auditory processing.
  • Guiding questions provide motivation for student engagement in the topic, and give a purpose to reading a text closely.
  • Inviting students to discuss their ideas in triads before they record anything on their graphic organizers can help to ensure that all students are engaged in the thinking process. It can also provide additional support to ELL students.

B. Researching Facts: Part 1 of the Jigsaw (20 minutes)

  • Display and distribute the Researching Factual Information graphic organizer. Invite students to read through the directions and the column headings with you.
  • Tell students that they are going to be researching facts about the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire that they could use in their newspaper articles. Explain that they are going to be doing a jigsaw so different triads will have different articles to research. Then they will come together at the end to share what they have found out. Tell students that this way they can share the workload of researching facts.
  • Distribute the research articles and glossaries.
  • Invite triads to begin researching. Remind students to discuss their ideas before writing anything on their individual graphic organizers.
  • Circulate to support students in reading the texts and underlining factual information. Ask guiding questions:

*   "Does this information answer the focus question: How did the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire affect the people of San Francisco?"

*   "Is this factual information? Is it something that is undeniably true?"

  • If students have been grouped homogeneously, focus your attention on those triads who need additional support reading the research materials.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Triad Share: Part 2 of the Jigsaw (12 minutes)

  • Invite triads to pair up with another triad to share the facts they have collected.
  • Invite triads to add any facts to their graphic organizer.
  • Inviting triads to share their work can function as a self-check and can enable triads to push each other's thinking further.

Homework

Homework
  • Continue reading your independent reading book.

 

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