Analyzing the Purpose of a Newspaper Article | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M3A:U2:L12

Analyzing the Purpose of a Newspaper Article

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can determine the main idea of an informational text based on details in the text. (RI.6.2)
  • I can write informative/explanatory texts that convey ideas and concepts using relevant information that is carefully selected and organized. (W.6.2)

Supporting Targets

  • I can find the gist of a model newspaper article.
  • I can determine the angle of a model newspaper article.
  • I can determine the purpose of a newspaper article and explain what readers expect from a newspaper article.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Model newspaper article annotations
  • Team Chalk Talk chart

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A.  Unpacking Learning Targets (3 minutes)

B.  Reviewing the Performance Task Prompt and Introducing the Rubric (10 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A.  Reading the Model Newspaper Article for Gist 
(14 minutes)

B.  Chalk Talk: The Purpose of a Newspaper Article 
(12 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A.  Whole Group Share (6 minutes)

4.  Homework

A.  Read your independent reading book.

  • This lesson and the next lesson introduce Unit 3 in order to give you some time to provide feedback on the draft literary analysis essays. Make sure students are aware of why they are jumping into Unit 3 before they have finished Unit 2. In this lesson, students read and analyze a model to determine the purpose of a newspaper article.
  • Students are introduced to the rubric in this lesson. The Newspaper Article Rubric is based on the New York State Grades 6-8 Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric, but it has been modified to assess the specific structure and organization of a newspaper article. There are two rubrics in supporting materials; one for student reference and one for teacher reference. The reason for this is that the elements specific to a newspaper article have been underlined for teacher reference, so that when students are asked to do the same thing, you have an answer key..
  • For Lesson 13, prepare the research materials for each triad (see Supporting Materials in Lesson 13). Each triad needs one research article, and you must have enough of each article for one per student. The articles provided are of a range of levels, so determine how to allocate the articles by considering the reading level of students in each triad. In addition to the article, each triad needs a glossary for their article too.
  • In advance: Review the model newspaper article and the Newspaper Article Rubric (see supporting materials).
  • Review: Chalk Talk Protocol (see Appendix).
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

gist, angle

Materials

  • Performance Task Prompt for the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire (from Lesson 1)
  • Newspaper Article Rubric (one per student and one for display)
  • Newspaper Article Rubric (with underlining; for teacher reference; see Teaching Note above)
  • Model newspaper article: "Sandy wreaks havoc across Northeast; at least 11 dead" (one per student and one for display)
  • Equity sticks (optional)
  • Chart paper (one piece per team)
  • Markers (a different color for each student in each team and a different color for you)
  • Newspaper Article Criteria anchor chart (new; teacher-created; see Closing and Assessment A)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Unpacking Learning Targets (3 minutes)

  • Tell students that while you look over their draft literary analyses to provide feedback, they are going to begin preparing for Unit 3.
  • Invite students to read the learning targets with you:

*   "I can find the gist of a model newspaper article."

*   "I can determine the angle of a model newspaper article."

*   "I can determine the purpose of a newspaper article and explain what readers expect from a newspaper article."

  • Remind students of what "finding the gist" means. Tell them that the angle is the main idea of a newspaper article. Explain that it is sometimes also called the "hook."
  • Ask students to discuss in triads:

*    "Why are we going to be reading a model newspaper article?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses. Listen for students to explain that analyzing a model will help them identify what they need to include in their own newspaper articles.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Reviewing the key academic vocabulary in learning targets can prepare students for vocabulary they may encounter in the lesson.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

B. Reviewing the Performance Task Prompt and Introducing the Rubric (10 minutes)

  • Invite students to reread the Performance Task Prompt for the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire to ground themselves in what is expected of them at the end of Unit 3.
  • Display and distribute the Newspaper Article Rubric. Explain to students that this is very similar to the writing rubric they often use for literary essays and other informative writing, but it has been adapted to assess specific features of a newspaper article.
  • Ask students to read through the criteria of the rubric and then to read through the column that scores "3." Then ask them to work in their triads to underline the parts of the rubric that are specific to a newspaper article.
  • Select volunteers to share with the whole group those parts of the rubric that they underlined. See Newspaper Article Rubric (for teacher reference) for guidance in which parts of the rubric should have been underlined.
  • Consider providing select students with a pre-highlighted version of the rubric that highlights the "3" score column to guide students toward the level you would like them to focus on.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reading the Model Newspaper Article for Gist (14 minutes)

  • Display and distribute the model newspaper article: "Sandy wreaks havoc across Northeast; at least 11 dead." Tell students they will now begin reading like a writer, studying a model newspaper article to see what they will be writing.
  • Invite students to follow along while you read the model newspaper article out loud.
  • Ask students to discuss in triads:

*   "What is this model newspaper article mostly about?"

  • Consider using equity sticks to select students to share their responses with the whole group. Listen for students to explain that the newspaper article is mostly about the destruction caused by Hurricane Sandy.
  • Explain to students that now they will be working in triads to reread and annotate each paragraph of the model newspaper article for the gist to get an idea of what each of the paragraphs is mostly about. Remind students to discuss the gist of each paragraph in their triads before recording anything.
  • Circulate and observe student annotations and invite students who are struggling to say the gist aloud to you before recording it.
  • Refocus the whole group. Ask students:

*   "So what is the angle of the model newspaper article? What is the main idea?"

  • Select volunteers to share the main idea of the model newspaper article with the whole group. Listen for them to explain that the main idea is that Hurricane Sandy caused widespread destruction including deaths and injuries.
  • Tell students that journalists make sure they include the "five W's" in their newspaper articles: who, what, where, when, and why. Ask students to identify the five W's in the model newspaper article:
  • Cold call volunteers to share their responses. Listen for students to explain and record on the board:

-   Who: The people affected by the hurricane

-   What: Destruction including injuries and deaths

-   Where: The Northeast of the United States

-   When: Monday

-   Why: Superstorm Sandy

  • Hearing a complex text read slowly, fluently, and without interruption or explanation promotes fluency for students: They are hearing a strong reader read the text aloud with accuracy and expression, and are simultaneously looking at and thinking about the words on the printed page. Be sure to set clear expectations that students read along silently in their heads as you read the text aloud.

B. Chalk Talk: The Purpose of a Newspaper Article (12 minutes)

  • Tell students that they are now going to do a Chalk Talk in their triads about the purpose of a newspaper article. Explain that thinking about the purpose of a newspaper article will help them make sure they include the necessary content in their own newspaper articles for the performance task.
  • Distribute chart paper and markers. Remind students that in a Chalk Talk there is no talking--instead students take turns to write their ideas on their piece of chart paper. Remind students that as it is a silent discussion, they are to ask and answer one another's questions as they answer the prompt questions.
  • Post the questions students are to discuss in their Chalk Talk:

*   "What is the purpose of a newspaper article?"

*   "What do readers need/expect from a newspaper article? Why?"

  • Invite triads to record those questions at the top of their chart paper before they begin.
  • Invite triads to begin the Chalk Talk. Circulate to ensure triads are talking only on paper and that all students are contributing. (This should be clear from the colors evident on the chart paper).
  • Note: To deepen students' thinking, on each team's chart paper, use a separate colored marker to record any questions or ideas relevant to what they are writing about. .
  • The Chalk Talk protocol can help to ensure that all students are engaged in thinking about the guiding questions and can enable students to push one another's thinking further without requiring them to speak.
  • Some students may need additional support and assistance in reading the ideas of others and writing their own ideas. Consider inviting those students who may struggle to write to say their ideas to you aloud before writing.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Whole Group Share (6 minutes)

  • Cold call triads to share their ideas. Record student ideas on the Newspaper Article Criteria anchor chart. Ensure the list includes:

-   Informative: Tells readers key facts about the who, what, where, when, why

-   Has an angle--a main idea, to be more precise

-   Provides quotes from eyewitnesses to give the reader an idea of what it was like to experience it

-   Objective (unbiased)

-   Compelling to make the reader want to keep reading all the way to the end

-   Believable

  • Capturing whole class thinking on an anchor chart can ensure quick reference later on.

Homework

Homework
  • Read your independent reading book.

 

Note: Preview Lesson 13 carefully and prepare the research articles in advance.

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