Planning for Writing: Introduction and Conclusion of a Literary Analysis Essay | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M3A:U2:L11

Planning for Writing: Introduction and Conclusion of a Literary Analysis Essay

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can write informative/explanatory texts that convey ideas and concepts using relevant information that is carefully selected and organized. (W.6.2)
  • I can introduce the topic of my text. (W.6.2a)
  • I can construct a concluding statement or section of an informative/explanatory text. (W6.2h)

Supporting Targets

  • I can identify and name key features of a strong introduction and conclusion for a literary analysis essay.
  • I can draft the introduction and conclusion of my literary analysis essay.

Ongoing Assessment

  • First draft of literary analysis essay
  • Self-assessment against Rows 1 and 3 of Grade 6 New York State Expository Writing Rubric

 

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A.  Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2.   Work Time

A.   Studying the Model and Drafting an Introductory Paragraph (15 minutes)

B.   Studying the Model and Drafting a Concluding Paragraph (22 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A.  Self-Assessment against the Grade 6 New York State Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric (6 minutes)

4.  Homework

A.  If you haven't finished your draft literary analysis (introductory paragraph, two body paragraphs, and a conclusion), finish it for homework. Be prepared to hand it in at the beginning of Lesson 12.

  • In this lesson, students draft the introductory and concluding paragraphs of their End of Unit 2 Assessment literary analysis essay. They revisit the model to get a firm grounding in what their introduction and conclusion should include.
  • If students have written literary arguments previously (as in Module 2, Unit 2), they will have experience using a model essay to help them write their own essays.
  • By the end of this lesson, students should have finished their draft argument essay for their end of unit assessment. Those who have not finished their draft by the end of this lesson will benefit from taking it home to finish it for homework. Remind them that they will need to hand in their essay in the next lesson.
  • Be prepared to provide student feedback in Lesson 14 using Row 2 of the New York State Grades 6-8 Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric. Provide specific positive feedback for at least one thing each student did well (star) and at least one specific area of focus for revision (step).
  • In preparation for the next lesson, you will need to put together research folders. See Lesson 12 supporting materials.
  • Unit 3 will be launched in Lessons 12 and 13 to give you an opportunity to assess the draft essays.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

introduction, conclusion, topic, claim, evidence

Materials

  • Model literary analysis essay (from Lesson 7; one per student)
  • Equity sticks
  • Qualities of a Strong Literary Analysis Essay anchor chart (begun in Lesson 8)
  • End of Unit 2 Assessment Prompt: Point of View of the Immediate Aftermath Literary Analysis Prompt (from Lesson 7; one per student)
  • Lined paper (one piece per student)
  • Immediate Aftermath Excerpt of "Comprehending the Calamity" (from Lesson 4)
  • Author's Purpose anchor chart (begun in Lesson 3)
  • Dragonwings (book; one per student)
  • Document camera
  • New York State Grades 6-8 Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric (from Lesson 7; one to display)
  • Rows 1 and 3 of the Grades 6-8 New York State Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Invite students to read the learning targets with you:

*   "I can identify and name key features of a strong introduction and conclusion for a literary analysis essay."

*   "I can draft the introduction and conclusion of my literary analysis essay."

  • Remind students that the introduction is the opening paragraph and the conclusion is the paragraph that closes the essay.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.
  • Discussing and clarifying the language of learning targets helps build academic vocabulary.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Studying the Model and Drafting an Introductory Paragraph (15 minutes)

  • Tell students that now that they have written a first draft of the body paragraphs of their analysis essay and know what they discussed in them, they are going to finish by drafting introductory and concluding paragraphs, which work to support the body paragraphs by introducing them and closing the essay afterward.
  • Invite students to read along silently as you read the introduction of the model literary analysis essay.
  • Ask them to discuss in triads:

*   "What is the purpose of the introduction?"

*   "What does the author include in the introductory paragraph?"

  • Consider using equity sticks to select students to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that the purpose of the introduction is to introduce readers to the content of the essay and to prepare them for what they are about to read. Record any new appropriate responses about what the author includes next to Introductory Paragraph on the Qualities of a Strong Literary Analysis Essay anchor chart for students to refer to throughout the lesson. Note that the key criteria have already been recorded in Lesson 7, but students may suggest other ideas that are useful.
  • Invite students to reread their draft body paragraphs 1 and 2 and the End of Unit 2 Assessment Prompt: Point of View of the Immediate Aftermath Literary Analysis Prompt to remind themselves of the question.
  • Invite students to pair up to verbally rehearse an introductory paragraph for their essays. Remind them to refer to the notes under Introduction on the Qualities of a Strong Literary Analysis Essay anchor chart to be sure their introduction does what it needs to do for their readers. Remind students also to refer to the model literary analysis as a guide.
  • Invite a couple of volunteers to share their verbal rehearsals with the whole group.
  • Distribute lined paper. Ask students to draft their introductory paragraph using their verbal rehearsal. Remind them that they are to write independently, without talking to classmates.
  • Circulate to assist students in drafting their introductory paragraphs. Ask:

*   "How can you begin the paragraph?"

*   "How did the author begin the model analysis essay?"

*   "What is important for the reader to know right at the beginning? Why?"

  • Providing models of expected work supports all learners, especially those who are challenged.
  • Allowing students to discuss their thinking with their peers before writing helps to scaffold comprehension and assists in language acquisition for ELLs.
  • Consider placing students in homogeneous pairs and provide more specific, direct support to those who need it most.

 

B. Studying the Model and Drafting a Concluding Paragraph (22 minutes)

  • Tell students they will now think about how to conclude their essays and take some time to draft a conclusion.
  • Invite triads to discuss what should go into the paragraph by asking:

*   "In this type of essay, how are introductions and conclusions similar to each other but different from the body paragraphs?"

  • Listen for: "They are both writing about the whole essay in some way" or "They are both 'big idea' writing, not about details."
  • Again invite triads to discuss:

*   "How are introductions and conclusions different from each other?"

  • Listen for: "The introduction should get the reader interested in the topic, while the conclusion should wrap up the essay by leaving the reader with something to think about."
  • Invite students to read along silently as you read the concluding paragraph of the model essay. Record any new responses on the Qualities of a Strong Literary Analysis Essay anchor chart for students to refer to throughout the lesson.
  • Ask triads to discuss:

*   "What is the purpose of the concluding paragraph?"

*   "What does the writer do in the concluding paragraph?"

  • Use equity sticks to select students to share their responses. Record any new appropriate responses about what the author includes next to Concluding Paragraph on the Qualities of a Strong Literary Analysis Essay anchor chart for students to refer to throughout the lesson. Note that the key criteria have already been recorded in Lesson 7, but students may suggest other ideas that are useful.
  • Remind students of the third bullet on the assessment prompt:

*   "How do the author's purposes affect the narrator's point of view of the immediate aftermath of the earthquake?"

  • Ask students to refer to their Immediate Aftermath Excerpt of "Comprehending the Calamity" and the Author's Purpose anchor chart to discuss in triads:

*   "So what is Emma Burke's purpose? What is she trying to do?"

*   "How did this affect her point of view?"

  • Students have already discussed this question, so this shouldn't be new thinking for them. Select volunteers to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that she was writing an informational text to inform people about the earthquake, which resulted in her point of view focusing on providing details about physical destruction and the significant events she witnessed.
  • Ask students to refer to pages 198-204 of Dragonwings and the Author's Purpose anchor chart to discuss in triads:

*   "So what is Laurence Yep's purpose? What is he trying to do?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that Yep is writing to entertain readers and draw them into the story. This results in him trying to draw us in emotionally by having Moon Shadow's point of view of the immediate aftermath of the earthquake focused on things that will appeal to the readers' emotions, like the people and their suffering.
  • Invite students to pair up to verbally rehearse their concluding paragraph. Remind them to refer to the Model Literary Essay and the Concluding Paragraph part of the Qualities of a Strong Literary Analysis Essay anchor chart.
  • Invite students to draft their concluding paragraphs on the same paper as their introductory paragraph.
  • Circulate to assist students in writing their concluding paragraphs. Ask:

*   "How can you summarize the argument?"

*   "How did the author conclude the model analysis essay?"

*   "How have the authors' purposes affected the narrators' points of view?"

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Self-Assessment against the Grade 6 New York State Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric (6 minutes)

  • Using a document camera, display the New York State Grades 6-8 Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric (from Lesson 7). Ask students to focus on Rows 1 and 3. Remind them that they have already seen the whole rubric and these are the two rows that apply to the introductory and concluding paragraphs.
  • Invite students to read the Criteria column and Level 3 indicators with you.
  • Distribute the new document: Rows 1 and 3 of the Grades 6-8 New York State Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric.  Tell students they are going to score the introductory and concluding paragraphs of the draft essay against the rubric--Row 1 of the rubric is about the introductory paragraph and Row 3 is about the concluding paragraph. Tell students to underline on the rubric where their essay fits best. They are then to justify how they have scored themselves using evidence from their essay on the lines underneath.
  • Remind students to be honest when self-assessing because identifying where there are problems with their work will help them improve it.
  • Circulate to ask questions to encourage students to think carefully about their scoring choices:

*   "You have underlined this part of your rubric. Why? Where is the evidence in your essay to support this?"

  • Those who finish quickly can begin to revise their draft essays based on their scoring against the rubric.
  • Tell students that now that they have finished the introductory and concluding paragraphs of their essays, they have completed the first draft.
  • Collect the first drafts and the self-assessments. Skim students' drafts for capitalization or punctuation errors that seem to recur, in preparation for the mini lesson in Lesson 14. Some students may need more time to finish their essays. Give them the opportunity to finish the essay at home and collect them at the beginning of the next lesson.
  • Inviting students to self-assess can enable them to identify their own errors, which gives them a sense of ownership when revising their work.

Homework

Homework
  • If you haven't finished your draft literary analysis (introductory paragraph, two body paragraphs, and a conclusion), finish it for homework. Be prepared to hand it in at the beginning of Lesson 12.

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