Launching the Performance Task: The 1906 San Francisco Earthquake and Fire | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M3A:U2:L1

Launching the Performance Task: The 1906 San Francisco Earthquake and Fire

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can use a variety of media to develop and deepen my understanding of a topic or idea. (RI.6.7)
  • I can interpret information presented in different media and formats. (SL.6.2)

Supporting Targets

  • I can use a photograph, a video, and a text excerpt to find out more about an event.

Ongoing Assessment

  • KWL anchor chart

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Launching the Research Topic: Mystery Photographs (10 minutes)

B. Reviewing Learning Target (2 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Gathering Data from a Video (12 minutes)

B. Gathering Data from a Text (10 minutes)

C. Summing Up the Data: Explaining the Mystery Event (5 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Introducing the Performance Task (6 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Finish reading Chapter 7 of Dragonwings, starting on page 156 with, "It was about two demon weeks after the water-pump incident." Use evidence flags to identify three text details from the rest of Chapter 7, then answer the focus question in your structured notes using text evidence

  • This lesson introduces students to the performance task, which they will complete at the end of Unit 3. The reason this is being introduced so soon is to serve as a bridge between Unit 1, which centers on the novel Dragonwings and Unit 2, which is where students are introduced to the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire through an informational text--a first person account of the event. Students have not reached the earthquake in Dragonwings yet, so it is essential at this stage not to "spoil" what happens later on in the book. Guidelines for how to handle this situation are given in the lesson plan directions.
  • Students are introduced to the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire with mystery photographs of the actual event and its aftermath. Each mystery photo will be cut into thirds and students will have to link their pieces to make a whole photograph. Then students will discuss what they know (observe) and wonder (ask questions) about the photograph. Do not tell students what the pictures are about. The mystery element is an engaging way to introduce a topic and build some background knowledge.
  • In Work Time A and B, students are given two other types of media (a video and a text) about this historic event. They will repeat this process of making observations and asking questions.
  • The Closing of this lesson formally introduces students to the performance task prompt so that they know what they are being asked to do by the end of Unit 3.
  • Note that these are older photographs that lose some of their quality once they are printed. You may want to display them digitally for students once they have pieced them together.
  • In advance: Cut each mystery photograph into thirds, so that each picture is like a puzzle that three students have to match up to make a whole picture again. Since there are six photographs total, some triads will have the same photograph. Remember to cut each photograph differently. Also, the simpler you make the cuts in each photograph, the more quickly students will solve the puzzle. This will allow students to have more time to discuss the photographs.
  • In advance: Determine how you want to group the triads: heterogeneously, homogeneously, or randomly. Students will remain in these triads throughout Units 2 and 3. If you decide to intentionally group students, you need to plan how you will distribute the pieces of the pictures so that the intended student gets a third of the proper photograph.
  • In advance: Preview the CBS 60 Minutes Historic Film: Market Street 1906. If there is not time to show the whole video, cue the video to be viewed from minutes 1:00-5:25 and 8:30-11:07.
  • In advance: Prepare chart paper for the KWL anchor chart. Create the posted KWL anchor chart in the same format as the triad KWL anchor chart (see supporting materials).
  • In advance: Review the performance task prompt.
  • Post: Learning targets and KWL anchor chart.

Vocabulary

notice, wonder, accurate, tremor, rubble, dynamite, outskirts, rationed

Materials

  • Mystery photographs (two copies of each, cut into thirds)
  • Tape dispensers (one per triad)
  • KWL anchor chart (new; co-created with students in Opening A)
  • 60 Minutes Historic Film: Market Street 1906 video (http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=7372854n)
  • Triad KWL anchor chart (one per triad)
  • Document camera
  • A Brief Account of the Facts (one for display)
  • Unit 2 word-catcher (two per student)
  • Performance Task Prompt (one per student and one to display)Structured Notes (from Unit 1, Lesson 1; optional for students who may need additional copies)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Launching the Research Topic: Mystery Photographs (10 minutes)

  • Distribute to each student one segment of the pre-cut mystery photographs (see directions in Teaching Notes for cutting photographs and determining grouping of students).
  • Explain to students that each segment is a puzzle piece. It is one-third of a photograph. Invite them to find the other two pieces of the puzzle and make a whole photograph. Tell them that there should be three to a group when they have matched up correctly. Tell students they have 1 minute.
  • After all students have found their match, invite them to sit in their triads. Ask one student from each triad to get a tape dispenser for their group. Direct students to quickly tape their photograph together.
  • Explain that each photograph is different but that all of them are pictures of a specific event in history. Direct students to discuss with their triad:

*   "Make as many observations about your picture as you can. What do you know about this event in history just from looking at the picture?"

  • Circulate and listen for students to make observations about people, buildings, and other observable items in their photographs. As needed, offer students a model like: "I see fire." Even as students try to guess what the event is, keep it a mystery and do not tell them what the photographs are about. Praise students for their accurate and detailed observations.
  • After a few minutes, direct students to discuss with their triad:

*   "What questions do you have about your photograph?"

  • Circulate and listen to students ask questions about their photographs. Listen for questions about what, who, where, when, and how. Consider jotting a few of these questions down to share back with the class.
  • Refocus whole class and direct students' attention to the posted KWL anchor chart. Explain that the Know column is for their observations/notices; the Wonder column is for their questions.
  • Cold call on each triad to share a few of their observations (know) and one or two questions (wonder) about their photograph. Write student thinking on the KWL anchor chart. Praise and bring attention to notices and wonders that address the five W's (who, what, where, when, why). As each triad shares their information, consider having one student walk around the room to show the class their photograph. Encourage students to look quietly while they listen.

B. Reviewing Learning Target (2 minutes)

  • Invite a volunteer to read the learning target out loud and invite the other students to silently follow along:

*    "I can use a photograph, a video, and a text excerpt to find out more about an event."

  • Explain that in this lesson students are introduced to an event that happened at around the same time period that Moon Shadow was a boy in the novel Dragonwings in preparation for the performance task. Make sure not to let students know that Moon Shadow experiences the earthquake and fire in the novel. If they ask, explain that they will read the rest of the book in this unit to find out.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Gathering Data from a Video (12 minutes)

  • Tell students they are going to watch a short video. Explain that the video is actually filmed in modern day, but parts of it talk about the historic event in the photographs. Tell students to keep trying to solve the mystery. Direct them to think about trying to answer the five W's--the who, what, when, where, and why of this mystery event. Direct students to keep making detailed and accurate observations. Ask them to discuss in triads:

*   "What does it mean to make an accurate observation?"

  • Cold call a student and listen for something like: "An accurate observation is where you tell only what is there; you don't add details."
  • Thank students. Invite them to make accurate observations of the video. Also, display the five W's and direct students to these words as a visual reminder of kinds of information to listen and watch for.

*   "Who?"

*   "What?"

*   "Where?"

*   "When?"

*   "Why?"

  • Display the 60 Minutes Historic Film: Market Street 1906 video. Cue the video and begin to play it at 1:00. At 5:24 fast-forward to 8:30. Stop the video at 11:07 minutes. If time allows, consider showing the whole video, which is 12 minutes long.
  • Distribute a triad KWL anchor chart to each triad. Invite them to discuss what they now know and what they wonder about the video. Ask them to write brief notes: observations in the Know column and questions in the Wonder column. Remind students to include information that answers any of the five W's.
  • Circulate and listen for: "where: San Francisco," "what: an earthquake; destruction of the city," "when: April 1906," "who: the people in the video." Support student discussions by prompting them with the five W's. Encourage students to make accurate and detailed observations.
  • Continue listening for the wonders students are discussing, such as: "How many people died?" and "What happened after the earthquake?" Encourage students to ask questions about the five W's.
  • Refocus whole class. Cold call on two or three triads to share what they now know and wonder. Consider calling on triads you were not able to circulate among during triad discussions to expand your check for understanding. Add new thinking to the KWL anchor chart.
  • Praise students for their accurate and detailed observations and strong questions that have helped them to figure out this mystery so far.
  • Inviting students to discuss questions in pairs or groups before asking them to share with the whole group will engage all students in the thinking process and give them more confidence to contribute, particularly ELL students.
  • Inviting ELL students to discuss questions with other ELL students who speak the same language will enable them to think more deeply about the questions being asked.
  • Stopping the video at strategic points to discuss complex issues that have been raised can ensure all students understand what is going on.

B. Gathering Data from a Text (10 minutes)

  • Tell students they will discuss one more piece of data--a brief account of the facts of this mystery event.
  • Direct students' attention to the document camera. Display A Brief Account of the Facts. Invite student to silently follow along as you read the text aloud.
  • Give directions:

a. Reread the text for the gist.

b. Discuss the italicized words with your triad and make sure everyone knows the meaning of these key words. Remember to use the strategies for determining unfamiliar words that you have been developing all school year. The italicized words will be used throughout this unit.

c. Add any new words to your Unit 2word-catcher.

d. Discuss what you want to add to the Know and Wonder columns of your triad KWL anchor chart and take notes as needed. Be ready to share with the whole class. Remember to gather more data on the five W's.

  • Circulate and listen for students discussing the facts: "what: a fire destroyed the city after the fire," "where: in the city," and "when: April 18, 1906; burned for three days."
  • Refocus whole class and invite a few triads to share what they know and wonder. Add new thinking to the Know and Wonder columns of the KWL anchor chart.
  • Posting multi-step directions for all students to see can provide students with some independence when working and help ensure that all students remain on task.
  • ELL students may need support identifying the meaning of additional unfamiliar words besides those in italics.

C. Summing Up the Data: Explaining the Mystery Event (5 minutes)

  • Explain that students have looked at three types of media: the photograph, the video, and the text about an event.
  • Ask triads to discuss:

*   "So what can you tell me about this event?"

  • Refocus whole class. Cold call on two or three triads to share their explanations of the event. In the Learned column on the KLW anchor chart, write the gist of one or two student explanations. An explanation might sound like: "A big earthquake and fire hit San Francisco in 1906, killing 450-700 people and destroying 490 blocks of the city. 250,000 were homeless and they had to move into white tents. Some people watched the fire burn the city. A few days before the earthquake, someone took a film of Market Street in San Francisco. The people didn't know what was about to happen."
  • Direct students' attention to the parts of the explanation that came from each media source. "Some people watched the fire burn the city" was from a photograph, while "450-700 people were killed" is from the text.
  • Congratulate students on putting information together from different media to solve their mystery.
  • Capturing whole class thinking on anchor charts enables students to synthesize their thinking and learn from one another. It also provides a source of reference that can be used as a starting point and built upon in later lessons.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Introducing the Performance Task (6 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the document camera. Display and distribute the Performance Task Prompt to students. Invite students to read it with you, and then discuss in triads:

*   "What do you notice?"

*   "What do you wonder?"

  • Invite students to share their notices and wonders with the whole group.
  • Explain that while they won't be completing the performance task in this unit, it is useful for students to know why they are changing their focus from Dragonwings to the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire. Tell students that over the course of this unit they are going to be exploring one person's point of view and perspective of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire that will help to prepare them to write a newspaper article for the performance task at the end of Unit 3.

Homework

Homework
  • Finish reading Chapter 7 of Dragonwings, starting on page 156 with, "It was about two demon weeks after the water-pump incident." Use evidence flags to identify three text details from the rest of Chapter 7, then answer the focus question in your structured notes using text evidence:

*   In the rest of Chapter 7, the two cultures--Tang and demon--are beginning to learn about each other's way of life. How does Moon Shadow begin to "fit in" to the demon culture in this chapter?

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