Finding Evidence of Laurence Yep’s Perspective of the Police in Dragonwings | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M3A:U1:L8

Finding Evidence of Laurence Yep’s Perspective of the Police in Dragonwings

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can explain how an author’s geographic location or culture affects his or her perspective. (RL.6.6a)
  • I can determine the meaning of literal, connotative, and figurative language (metaphors and similes) in literary text. (RL.6.4)

Supporting Targets

  • I can identify evidence of Laurence Yep’s perspective on the police in Dragonwings.
  • I can explain what connotative language is and identify the meaning of connotative language.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Structured notes (from homework)
  • Gathering Evidence of Yep’s Perspective: Crime in the Neighborhood graphic organizer

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Reader: Chapter 5 of Dragonwings (5 minutes)

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Feedback from Mid-Unit 1 Assessment (4 minutes)

B. Introducing Connotative Language (10 minutes)

C. Identifying Evidence of Laurence Yep’s Perspective in Dragonwings (14 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Forming a Connection Statement about Evidence of Laurence Yep’s Perspective in Dragonwings (10 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Finish reading Chapter 5, pages 108–123. Answer this focus question in your structured notes:

* “How does Moon Shadow’s point of view of his father change in this chapter?” Use evidence flags to identify three text details to support your answer.

  • Lesson 8 builds on the work completed in Lesson 7. Students complete the final column of their Crime in the Neighborhood graphic organizer, adding evidence of author Laurence Yep’s perspective of the police in Dragonwings.
  • In this lesson, students are introduced to connotative language as another form of intentional word choice, specifically as a way of conveying perspective.
  • A suggested answer  for the exit ticket has been provided in the supporting materials.
  • In advance: Read pages 106–108 of Dragonwings, beginning with “Father turned heavily in his seat …” and ending with “Father said, ‘And that’s to do it myself,’” to familiarize yourself with the events and how they might show evidence of Laurence Yep’s perspective of the police; have the mid-unit assessments ready to return to students with feedback.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

perspective, connotative language; sleepers, justices (106)

Materials

  • Dragonwings (book; one per student)
  • Connotative Language in Dragonwings anchor chart (new; teacher-created)
  • Connotative Language in Dragonwings anchor chart (for teacher reference)
  • Equity sticks
  • Gathering Evidence of Yep’s Perspective: Crime in the Neighborhood graphic organizer (from Lesson 7; one per student)
  • Evidence flags (five per student)
  • Identifying Evidence of Laurence Yep’s Perspective in Dragonwings task card (from Lesson 6; one per student)
  • Gathering Evidence of Yep’s Perspective: Crime in the Neighborhood graphic organizer (from Lesson 7; answers for teacher reference)
  • Connection Statement anchor chart (new; teacher-created)
  • Connection Statement model (for teacher reference)
  • Exit Ticket: Laurence Yep’s Perspective (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Chapter 5 of Dragonwings (5 minutes)

  • Remind students of the homework question:

* “What was Moon Shadow’s point of view of Black Dog after he stole the collection money?”

  • Be sure students have their text, Dragonwings.  Invite them to share text evidence of their answers from their structured notes in triads.
  • Select volunteers to share the evidence they recorded to support their answers. Listen to make sure students understood that Moon Shadow was robbed and beaten by Black Dog but felt only pity for him afterward. Direct them to the sentence in the middle of page 105, “How could you be mad at some dumb, pain-goaded animal?”
  • Reviewing homework holds all students accountable for reading the novel and completing their homework.

 

 

 

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Invite students to read today’s learning targets with you aloud:

* “I can identify evidence of Laurence Yep’s perspective on the police in Dragonwings.”

* “I can explain what connotative language is and identify the meaning of connotative language.”

  • Remind the class what perspective means.
  • Circle the word connotative in the last learning target. Remind students that authors make intentional word choices when they write, as they saw when they studied figurative language in the first half of the unit. Tell them that connotative language is another kind of word choice that authors use, especially when they want to communicate a perspective to readers. Define connotative language for students as a word or phrase that has been used in such a way to carry emotional meaning.
  • Today they will look at how Yep uses this kind of language in Dragonwings to share his perspective.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. They also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.
  • Discussing and clarifying the language of learning targets helps build academic vocabulary.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Feedback from Mid-Unit 1 Assessment (4 minutes)

  • Hand back the mid-unit assessments and invite students to spend time reading your feedback and thinking about:

* “How can this feedback help you to improve your work on Laurence Yep’s perspective and how it is evident through Moon Shadow’s point of view in Dragonwings?”

  • Invite them to write their name on the board if they have questions, so that you can follow up either immediately or later on in the lesson.

B. Introducing Connotative Language (10 minutes)

  • Point to the final learning target and ask a student to reread it aloud:

* “I can explain what connotative language is and identify the meaning of connotative language.”

  • Tell students that, like figurative language, writers often use connotative language to help readers understand the story. Restate the definition of connotative language (from the opening), and provide the example that in Dragonwings, Laurence Yep chooses to use the word “demon” for anyone who is not in the Tang community, especially the white Americans.
  • Post the Connotative Language in Dragonwings anchor chart. Write the word demon in the first box in the left column.
  • Ask triads to discuss:

* “What does the word demon literally mean?”

  • Cold call students for their responses. Listen for: “something evil” or “something bad.” Record the literal meaning in the second column of the anchor chart. See the Connotative Language in Dragonwings anchor chart (for teacher reference).
  • Ask:

* “Why has Laurence Yep chosen the word demon to describe anyone outside the Tang community in Dragonwings?”

  • Consider using equity sticks to select students to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that the word demon has been used to show that Moon Shadow was afraid of anyone other than Tang people and felt they were evil and dangerous. Record the connotative meaning in the third column.
  • Ask students to go back to a sentence from the passage they read today from Dragonwings, at the bottom of page 107, which begins with “They are our brothers.” Repeat the process on the anchor chart with this word. Refer to the Connotative Language in Dragonwings anchor chart (for teacher reference).
  • Anchor charts serve as note-catchers when the class is co-constructing ideas.
  • Modeling provides a clear vision of the expectation for students.

C. Identifying Evidence of Laurence Yep’s Perspective in Dragonwings (14 minutes)

  • Invite students to reread the answers they recorded on the Gathering Evidence of Yep’s Perspective: Crime in the Neighborhood graphic organizer from the previous lesson, in which they found evidence of and then inferred Laurence Yep’s perspective of the police in The Lost Garden excerpt.
  • Remind students that an author’s perspective is often evident in his or her writing. Tell them that they are going to reread an excerpt of Dragonwings to look for evidence of where Laurence Yep may have communicated his own perspective of the police that they inferred in Lesson 7.
  • Distribute evidence flags and invite students to refer to their Identifying Evidence of Laurence Yep’s Perspective in Dragonwings task card. Tell them that they are going to reread pages 106–108 of Dragonwings, beginning with “Father turned heavily in his seat …” and ending with “Father said, ‘And that’s to do it myself.’” They should follow the directions on the task card to identify evidence of Yep’s perspective.
  • Circulate to listen to triad discussions and remind students to find evidence in the text to support their claims.
  • Consider using equity sticks to select students to share their triad discussion and notes on the graphic organizer with the whole group. Listen for something like the suggestions on the Gathering Evidence of Yep’s Perspective: Crime in the Neighborhood graphic organizer (answers for teacher reference) to guide students in the right direction.
  • Asking students to discuss challenging questions before recording them helps to ensure that all students have an idea about what to write and can give students confidence in their responses. 

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Forming a Connection Statement about Evidence of Laurence Yep’s Perspective in Dragonwings (10 minutes)

  • Tell students that even though they may be able to recognize Laurence Yep’s perspective in Dragonwings, explaining what they see, clearly, in writing is trickier.
  • Tell students that whenever they make a claim about text and support it with text evidence, they must show the reader how the evidence is connected to the claim by making a connection statement.
  • Display the Connection Statement anchor chart. Read each sentence stem on the chart aloud. Model how to make a connection statement about Laurence Yep’s perspective of fitting into another culture (from Lesson 6) using the Connection Statement model (for teacher reference).
  • Distribute Exit Ticket: Laurence Yep’s Perspective. Invite students to fill it out for their work on Laurence Yep’s perspective on the police.
  • Using exit tickets allows a quick check for understanding of the learning target so that instruction can be adjusted or tailored to students’ needs during the lesson or before the next lesson.

Homework

Homework
  • Finish reading Chapter 5, pages 108–123. Answer this focus question in your structured notes:

* “How does Moon Shadow’s point of view of his father change in this chapter?”

  • Use evidence flags to identify three text details to support your answer.

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