Inferring Laurence Yep’s Perspective on the Police from the Crime in the Neighborhood Excerpt of The Lost Garden | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M3A:U1:L7

Inferring Laurence Yep’s Perspective on the Police from the Crime in the Neighborhood Excerpt of The Lost Garden

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • Explain how an author's geographic location or culture affects his or her perspective. (RL.6.6a)

Supporting Targets

  • I can find the gist of the Crime in the Neighborhood excerpt.
  • I can identify details in the Crime in the Neighborhood excerpt that affected Laurence Yep's perspective on the police.
  • I can infer how those details affected Laurence Yep's perspective on the police.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Structured notes (from homework)
  • Gathering Evidence of Yep's Perspective: Crime in the Neighborhood graphic organizer

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Reader: Chapter 4, Pages 74-97 of Dragonwings (5 minutes)

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (3 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Reading for Gist: The Crime in the Neighborhood Excerpt from The Lost Garden (15 minutes)

B. Identifying Cultural Details through Questions: The Crime in the Neighborhood Excerpt of The Lost Garden (8 minutes)

C. Inferring Laurence Yep's Perspective on the Police (9 minutes (8 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Sharing Ideas (5 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Read Chapter 5 up to page 108, stopping after "... all the others in the room could feel it too." Answer this focus question in your structured notes:

* "What was Moon Shadow's point of view of Black Dog after he stole the collection money?" Use evidence flags to identify three text details from this section of Chapter 5 to support your answer.

  • In this lesson, students read a second excerpt from Laurence Yep's autobiography, The Lost Garden.
  • This lesson is similar in structure to Lesson 6; however, due to the length of the excerpt, in this lesson students do not refer back to Dragonwings to find evidence of Laurence Yep's perspective. They do this in Lesson 8 to ensure they have sufficient time to closely analyze both texts.
  • In advance: Review the Concentric Circles protocol (Appendix).
  • Be prepared to return the mid-unit assessment to students in Lesson 8.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

Lesson Vocabulary

gist, infer, perspective;

Paragraph 3: lingered

Paragraph 4: blustered, threatened

Paragraph 5: agonizing, circular file, confrontation

Materials

  • Crime in the Neighborhood excerpt from The Lost Garden (one per student and one to display)
  • Word-catcher (from previous lessons; one per student)
  • Dictionaries (enough for students to be able to refer to as they are reading)
  • Gathering Evidence of Laurence Yep's Perspective: Crime in the Neighborhood graphic organizer (one per student)
  • Gathering Evidence of Laurence Yep's Perspective: Crime in the Neighborhood graphic organizer 
    (answers for teacher reference)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Chapter 4, Pages 74-97 of Dragonwings (5 minutes)

  • Remind the class of the Concentric Circles protocol, in which students stand in concentric circles and rotate to face a partner to answer the teacher's questions.
  • Direct students to form two circles, an inside circle and an outside circle, standing face-to-face. If there is an odd number of students, join a circle so that everyone has someone to pair up with. Invite students to bring their structured notes with them to the circles. 
  • Ask the two questions below twice to give students increased opportunities to speak and listen about the novel. Rotate after each question is asked: 

* "What happens in the second half of Chapter 4 after Windrider fixes Mr. Alger's horseless carriage?"

* "What is Moon Shadow's point of view of the opium dens?"

  • Direct students to return to their seats and refocus whole class.
  • Reviewing homework holds all students accountable for reading the novel and completing their homework.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (3 minutes)

  • Invite students to silently read the learning targets as you read them aloud:

* "I can find the gist of the Crime in the Neighborhood excerpt."

* "I can identify details in the Crime in the Neighborhood excerpt that affected Laurence Yep's perspective on the police."

* "I can infer how those details affected Laurence Yep's perspective on the police."

  • Point out that students had similar learning targets in the previous lesson when reading the opening excerpt. Remind them of what gist, infer, and perspective mean.
  • Tell students that in this lesson, they will read a new excerpt from The Lost Garden and use clues from the excerpt to infer about Laurence Yep's perspective.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. They also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.
  • Discussing and clarifying the language of learning targets helps build academic vocabulary.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reading for Gist: The Crime in the Neighborhood Excerpt from The Lost Garden (15 minutes)

  • Display and distribute the Crime in the Neighborhood excerpt from The Lost Garden. Invite students to read along silently in their heads as you read it aloud. Remind them that the purpose for reading is to discover Yep's perspective and how it influences what he writes about. Tell the class to listen for things that shaped his beliefs, values, and ideas.
  • Tell students they are going to reread the Crime in the Neighborhood excerpt for gist.
  • Pair students up and invite them to work together to annotate for gist and record unfamiliar words on their word-catcher. Remind students to write their gist annotations of each paragraph in the margin of the paper and to use their word-catchers to record any new vocabulary.
  • Tell students that if they aren't sure what the word means after looking for context clues and looking in the dictionary, they should leave the definition column blank, awaiting discussion with the whole group later on.
  • Circulate and support students as they read. For those who need more support, ask them to practice telling you the gist of a section before they write it down.
  • Invite students to get into triads to compare what they wrote for their gist statements and to help each other with any unfamiliar vocabulary they haven't been able to figure out.
  • Refocus whole class and invite students to share any unfamiliar vocabulary words they found, along with the definition. If students were unable to work out the definition from the context or find it in a dictionary, encourage other students to assist them with the meaning. To keep things moving, if no one else knows a definition, offer one yourself.
  • These are words students may struggle with, so be sure to address them here: lingered, blustered, threatened, agonizing, circular file, confrontation.
  • Hearing a complex text read slowly, fluently, and without interruption or explanation promotes fluency for students. They are hearing a strong reader read the text aloud with accuracy and expression and are simultaneously looking at and thinking about the words on the printed page. Be sure to set clear expectations that students read along silently in their heads as you read the text aloud.
  • Allow students to grapple with a complex text before explicit teaching of vocabulary. After students have read for gist, they can identify challenging vocabulary for themselves. 
  • Asking students to identify challenging vocabulary helps them monitor their understanding of a complex text. When students annotate the text by circling these words, it can also provide a formative assessment for the teacher.

B. Identifying Cultural Details through Questions: The Crime in the Neighborhood Excerpt of The Lost Garden (8 minutes)

  • Display and distribute the Gathering Evidence of Laurence Yep's Perspective: Crime in the Neighborhood graphic organizer. Remind students that the purpose of the organizer is to support them with the learning targets.
  • Invite them to reread along with you the learning target that will be the next focus:

* "I can identify details in the Crime in the Neighborhood excerpt that affected Laurence Yep's perspective on the police."

  • Invite students to read the questions on the organizer with you as you read them aloud. Remind them that, as in the previous lesson, they need to reread the questions in Column 1, review their excerpt, discuss the answers with their triad, and then record the answers to the questions in Column 2. For now, they should leave the other columns blank. Clarify directions as needed.
  • Invite students to work in triads to discuss their answers before recording them.
  • Circulate and observe student work. As needed, support students by asking them to use evidence from the excerpt to answer the questions. 
  • Refocus the whole class after a few minutes. Cold call students you missed while circulating to increase your check for understanding of the whole class. Listen for responses like those listed on the Gathering Evidence of Laurence Yep's Perspective: Crime in the Neighborhood (answers for teacher reference). Invite students to revise their organizers as necessary based on what they hear from the rest of the class.
  • Asking students to discuss challenging questions before recording them helps to ensure that all students have an idea about what to write and can give students confidence in their responses.
  • Text-dependent questions can be answered only by referring explicitly back to the text being read. This encourages students to reread the text for further analysis and allows for a deeper understanding.
  • Some students may benefit from having access to "hint cards": small slips of paper or index cards that they turn over for hints about how/where to find the answers to text-dependent questions. For example, a hint card might say, "look in the third paragraph."
  • Some students may benefit from having key sections pre-highlighted in their texts. This will help them focus on small sections rather than scanning the whole text for answers.

C. Inferring Laurence Yep's Perspective on the Police (9 minutes)

  • Ask for a volunteer to read the last learning target aloud:

* "I can infer how those details affected Laurence Yep's perspective on the police."

  • Remind students that perspective means how you see something, based on your background and your previous experiences. Direct their attention to the question at the top of the third column of the graphic organizer:

* "As a result of what you have read so far, what do you think Yep's perspective on the police might be? How do you think Laurence Yep sees the police as a result of this experience with them?"

  • Remind students that they are going to have to infer the answer to the question because Yep doesn't give us this answer directly, but he does give us clues to infer the answer to the question. 
  • Remind students to reread the excerpt and their answers to the questions in the second column and to discuss the question at the top of the third column in triads before recording their answers in the final column of their graphic organizer.
  • Circulate among students and listen for them to use clues from the text to answer the questions. If students are struggling, prompt them with the following questions:

* "Do you think his perspective on the police was that they were helpful in controlling crime in his neighborhood? Why/why not? What evidence can you see in the excerpt to lead you to that answer?"

* "Do you think his perspective on the police was that they cared about the crime in his neighborhood? Why/why not?"

  • Asking students to discuss challenging questions before recording their answer helps to ensure that all students have an idea about what to write and can give students confidence in their responses. 

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Sharing Ideas (5 minutes)

  • Refocus whole class. Select volunteers to share an inference they made about Laurence Yep's perspective on the police based on what they read in the excerpt.
  • Listen for responses like those listed on the Gathering Evidence of Laurence Yep's Perspective: Crime in the Neighborhood (answers for teacher reference).
  • Invite students to revise their organizers as necessary, based on what they hear from the rest of the class.
  • Asking students to share their ideas can enable them to build on their own thinking using the ideas of others, deepening their understanding. It can also help them to identify where they need to make revisions.

Homework

Homework
  • Read Chapter 5 up to page 108, stopping after "... all the others in the room could feel it too." Answer this focus question in your structured notes:

* "What was Moon Shadow's point of view of Black Dog after he stole the collection money?"

  • Use evidence flags to identify three text details from this section of Chapter 5 to support your answer.

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