Analyzing Point of View and Figurative Language: Chapter 3 | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M3A:U1:L4

Analyzing Point of View and Figurative Language: Chapter 3

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can determine the meaning of literal and figurative language (metaphors and similes) in literary text. (RL.6.4)
  • I can analyze how an author's word choice affects tone and meaning in a literary text. (RL.6.4)
  • I can analyze how a particular sentence, stanza, scene, or chapter fits in and contributes to the development of a literary text. (RL.6.5)
  • I can analyze how an author develops a narrator or speaker's point of view. (RL.6.6)

Supporting Targets

  • I can find the gist of pages 41-43 and 60-61 of Dragonwings.
  • I can determine the meaning of figurative language.
  • I can analyze how the words affect tone and meaning.
  • I can explain how a chapter fits into a theme.
  • I can analyze how Laurence Yep develops Moon Shadow's point of view of his father.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Gist annotated on sticky notes
  • New vocabulary on word-catcher
  • Moon Shadow's Point of View graphic organizer: pages 41-43 and 60-61

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A.  Engaging the Reader: Chapter 3 of Dragonwings (8 minutes)Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

B.  Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A.  Rereading Pages 41-43 and 60-61 of Dragonwings for Gist (10 minutes)

B.  Analyzing Point of View, Figurative Language, and Tone: Pages 41-43 and 60-61 (10 minutes)

C.  Determining Author's Techniques: Point of View, Tone and Meaning, and Figurative Language (10 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A.  Exit Ticket: How Does the Chapter Contribute to a Theme? (5 minutes)

4.  Homework

A.  Read Chapter 4 up to the end of page 70 of Dragonwings. Answer this question in your structured notes:

* "What does Moon Shadow think about the demons?" Use evidence flags to identify three text details from the chapter to support your answer. Code each flag as a thought, word, or action to show the technique that Laurence Yep used to convey Moon Shadow's point of view of the demons.

  • This lesson is similar in structure to Lesson 3: students work in pairs without any teacher modeling to find the gist and to analyze an excerpt of Dragonwings for point of view, figurative language, tone, and meaning. But the analysis of point of view has a different focus: the focus is Moon Shadow's point of view of his father.
  • In advance: Read pages 41-43 and 60-61 and the answer key for the Point of View graphic organizer to familiarize yourself with what students will be doing and the answers you will need to guide them toward (see supporting materials).
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

gist, figurative language, tone, point of view; tamed (41), crystal set, filaments (42), reassuring, superior, devices (43), newfound (60)

Materials

  • Materials
  • Dragonwings (book; one per student)
  • Equity sticks
  • Sticky notes (six per student)
  • Word-catcher (from previous lessons; one per student)
  • Dictionaries (enough for students to be able to refer to as they are reading)
  • Moon Shadow's Point of View graphic organizer: Pages 41-43 and 60-61 (one per student)
  • Moon Shadow's Point of View graphic organizer: Pages 41-43 and 60-61 (answers for teacher reference)
  • Colored pencils or markers (red and blue; one of each color per student)
  • Thought, Word, Action symbols (from Lesson 1; for teacher reference)
  • Exit Ticket: How Does the Chapter Contribute to a Theme? (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Chapter 3 of Dragonwings (8 minutes)

  • Be sure students have their text, Dragonwings. Ask students to discuss in triads:

* "What happens in Chapter 3?"

  • Listen for them to explain that Moon Shadow's father tells him a story about a dragon king and how he got the name Windrider.
  • Invite students to refer to their structured notes and the answer they wrote to the homework focus question:

* "What does Moon Shadow think about his father?"

  • Invite triads to discuss their answers to the question.
  • Select students using equity sticks to share their answers with the whole class. Clarify any misconceptions.

 

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Invite students to read the learning targets with you:

* "I can find the gist of pages 41-43 of Dragonwings."

* "I can determine the meaning of figurative language."

* "I can analyze how the words affect tone and meaning."

* "I can explain how a chapter fits into a theme."

* "I can analyze how Laurence Yep develops Moon Shadow's point of view of his father."

  • Students should be familiar with these learning targets from previous lessons. Remind them what gist, figurative language, tone, and point of view are.
  • Opening the lesson by asking students to share their homework makes students accountable for completing homework. It also gives you the opportunity to monitor which children have not been completing their homework.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Rereading Pages 41-43 and 60-61 of Dragonwings for Gist (10 minutes)

  • Tell students they are going to reread pages 41-43 and 60-61 of Dragonwings for the gist. Remind them that they should have done a first read of these pages for homework.
  • Tell them that they are going to reread from "He pushed open the door ..." on page 41 to "I guess I don't know about being your son" at the end of page 43. Then they should read from "Father sat in silence for some time ..." on page 60 to "a friend and a guide" on page 61.
  • Remind students to write their annotations of the gist of each paragraph on sticky notes to stick in the margin of the book and to use their word-catcher to record any new vocabulary.
  • Tell students that if they aren't sure what the word means after looking for context clues and looking in the dictionary, they should leave the definition column blank for now.
  • Pair students up and invite them to work together to find the gist and record unfamiliar words on their word-catchers for pages 41-43 and 60-61.
  • Circulate and support students as they read. For those who need more support, ask them to practice telling you the gist of a section before they write it down.
  • Invite students to get into triads to compare what they wrote for their gist statements and to help each other with any unfamiliar vocabulary they haven't been able to figure out.
  • Refocus the whole group and invite students to share any unfamiliar vocabulary words they found on pages 41-43 and 60-61, along with the definition. If they were unable to work out the meaning, encourage other students to assist them with the definition. To keep things moving, if no one else knows what the word means, offer a definition yourself.
  • Students may struggle with these words, so be sure to address them here: tamed, crystal set, filaments, reassuring, superior, devices, newfound.
  • Remind students to record new words on their word-catcher.
  • Mixed-ability pairing of students for discussion and close reading exercises will provide a collaborative and supportive structure for reading complex texts and close reading of the text.
  • Asking students to identify challenging vocabulary helps them monitor their understanding of a complex text.
  • ELLs may be unfamiliar with more vocabulary words than are mentioned in this lesson. Check for comprehension of general words that most students would know.

B. Analyzing Point of View, Figurative Language, and Tone: Pages 41-43 and 60-61 (15 minutes)

  • Distribute Moon Shadow's Point of View graphic organizer:
  • Pages 41-43 and 60-61 and remind students that they filled out a similar organizer in Lesson 3 to analyze Moon Shadow's point of view of his father, the use of language, and how it creates tone and meaning.
  • Remind students what should be recorded in each column of the organizer. Explain that in this lesson, they will use the organizer to help them analyze pages 41-43 and 60-61 to identify Moon Shadow's point of view of his father, the language used to communicate this point of view, and the tone that the language creates. Remind students that they have already started to look for this in their homework and can refer to the ideas recorded on their structured notes as they work.
  • Tell students to use the questions at the top of the columns to guide their analysis and thinking.
  • Pair students up to analyze the text. Remind them to discuss their answers before recording on their graphic organizers.
  • Circulate to assist students with analyzing the text for point of view, language, and tone. As you circulate, ask probing questions such as the following:

* "What is Moon Shadow's point of view of his father?"

* "How do you know? How did Laurence Yep develop Moon Shadow's point of view of his father?"

* "Which specific words, phrases, and sentences from the text support your claim about Moon Shadow's point of view?"

* "Which of these words, phrases, and sentences contain figurative language? Circle them."

*"Based on the images, words, and phrases you have selected, how would you describe the tone of the text with one word?"

  • Invite students to get into triads to share their graphic organizers. Encourage them to add to and revise their organizers based on what they learn from the other people in their triads.
  • Cold call students to share their ideas with the whole group. Refer to Moon Shadow's Point of View graphic organizer (answers for teacher reference) to guide students.
  • Ask triads to discuss:

* "How did Moon Shadow's point of view of his father change from pages 41-43 to pages 60-61?"

  • Select volunteers to share their responses. Listen for them to say that by 60-61, he was a lot more comfortable and familiar with his father and felt like he belonged with his father, compared with pages 41-43, when he was nervous around his father.
  • Graphic organizers and recording forms engage students more actively and provide the necessary scaffolding that is especially critical for learners with lower levels of language proficiency and/or learning
  • When reviewing the graphic organizers or recording forms, consider using a document camera to display the document for students who struggle with auditory processing.

C. Determining Author's Techniques: Point of View, Tone and Meaning, and Figurative Language (10 minutes)

  • Remind students of the ways Laurence Yep develops Moon Shadow's point of view that they identified in Lesson 1:
    • Through his own thoughts, actions, feelings
    • Through the words and actions of others
    • Tell students that now they are going to work in triads to analyze the details they have recorded from the text in the middle column. Distribute colored pencils or markers and tell students to underline details as follows:
      • Through Moon Shadow's own thoughts, actions, and feelings--red
      • Through the words and actions of others--blue
      • Remind students of the symbols on the Thought, Word, Action symbols (for teacher reference) and tell them to also code whether the evidence is a thought, word, or action.
      • Refocus the group. Ask triads to discuss:

* "So what techniques does Yep use to develop Moon Shadow's point of view of his father in this excerpt?"

  • Listen for students to explain that in this excerpt, most of Moon Shadow's point of view comes from his own thoughts.
  • Ask triads to discuss:

* "What figurative language did you find? What does it mean literally?"

  • Cold call students to share figurative language and literal meaning with the whole group.
  • If it hasn't already been discussed, ask triads to discuss this specific example:

* On page 41, Moon Shadow says, 'He showed me each item, handling the strange machines as if he had tamed whatever demons were trapped inside.' What does this mean?"

  • Consider using equity sticks to select students to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that it means that he handled the machines very carefully.
  • Ask triads to discuss:

* "Why does Yep use this figurative language here? What does it do for the reader?"

  • Listen for students to explain that it helps the reader understand how Moon Shadow's father was touching the objects.
  • Invite students to focus on the Tone column. Ask triads to discuss:

* "You selected one word to describe the tone of each of the details from the text that you selected. How did the author create that tone? What techniques did he use? What examples can you provide?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that word choice helps to create the tone. For example, in this sentence, "He waited almost shyly by the doorway as I went inside," the word "shyly" sets the tone as nervous and awkward.
  • Asking students to color code and add symbols to their text provides a clear visual reference for analysis.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Exit Ticket: How Does the Chapter Contribute to a Theme? (5 minutes)

  • Distribute Exit Ticket: How Does the Chapter Contribute to a Theme? Remind students of the theme recorded at the top of the exit ticket: "It's hard to fit in when you move to live in another culture."
  • Ask triads to discuss:

* "Is Moon Shadow finding it difficult to fit in during the events in Chapter 3? If so, how?"

* "Is it any easier for Moon Shadow to fit in during the events in Chapter 3 than it is in Chapter 2? Why?"

  • Invite students to write their ideas on their exit tickets.
  • Collect students' exit tickets to informally assess
  • Using exit tickets allows a quick check for understanding of the learning target so that instruction can be adjusted or tailored to students' needs during the lesson or before the next lesson. 

Homework

Homework
  • Read Chapter 4 up to the end of page 70 of Dragonwings. Answer this question in your structured notes:

* "What does Moon Shadow think about the demons?" Use evidence flags to identify three text details from the chapter to support your answer. Code each flag as a thought, word, or action to show the technique that Laurence Yep used to convey Moon Shadow's point of view of the demons.

 

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