End of Unit Assessment: Finding Evidence of Laurence Yep’s Perspective on Being Chinese in Dragonwings and Determining Connotative Language | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M3A:U1:L10

End of Unit Assessment: Finding Evidence of Laurence Yep’s Perspective on Being Chinese in Dragonwings and Determining Connotative Language

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can determine the meaning of literal, connotative, and figurative language (metaphors and similes) in literary text. (RL.6.4).
  • Explain how an author's geographic location or culture affects his or her perspective. (RL.6.6a)

Supporting Targets

  • I can identify evidence of Laurence Yep's perspective on being Chinese in Dragonwings.
  • I can explain what connotative language is and identify the meaning of connotative language.

Ongoing Assessment

  • End of Unit 1 Assessment

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. End of Unit 1 Assessment (35 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Concentric Circles: What Can We Learn from Laurence Yep? (8 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Read Chapter 7 up to page 150, stopping near the end of the page after "Father and I excused ourselves and left." Answer this question in your structured notes:

* "What are the differences between how Miss Whitlaw views dragons and how Moon Shadow views dragons?" Use evidence flags to identify three text details in this part of the chapter to support your answer.

  • Lesson 10 is the end of unit assessment. It builds on the work completed in Lesson 9 and is similar in structure to Lesson 8, although this time students will work independently to find evidence of Laurence Yep's perspective on being Chinese in Dragonwings.
  • Before students begin working on this excerpt, it is important that you ensure they are aware that if Laurence Yep was regretful of his attitude toward being Chinese as a child, he may communicate this by making Moon Shadow behave in a different way in the novel. Remind them that he suggests in the opening excerpt from The Lost Garden that he changes things from real life in his writing to make them as he wants them to be.
  • Assess student responses on the end of unit assessment using the Grade 6 2-Point Rubric--Short Response.  Use the End of Unit Assessment: Finding Evidence of Laurence Yep's Perspective in Dragonwings and Determining Connotation (example answers for teacher reference) in the supporting materials to guide you, but be aware that this is just an example of the kinds of things students may have written.
  • In advance: Read pages 145-149 of Dragonwings, from the beginning of the chapter to "... but all I could come up with was, 'No dragon pleasant. A dragonee dragon'" to familiarize yourself with the events and how they might show evidence of Laurence Yep's perspective on being Chinese.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

Do not pre-teach vocabulary for this assessment.

Materials

  • End of Unit 1 Assessment: Finding Evidence of Laurence Yep's Perspective in Dragonwings and Determining Connotation (one per student)
  • Being Chinese excerpt (from Lesson 9; one per student)
  • Gathering Evidence of Laurence Yep's Perspective: Being Chinese graphic organizer (from Lesson 9; one per student)
  • Dragonwings (one per student)
  • Evidence flags (five per student)
  • End of Unit 1 Assessment: Finding Evidence of Laurence Yep's Perspective in Dragonwings and Determining Connotation (answers, for teacher reference)
  • Grade 6 2-Point Rubric--Short Response.   (for teacher reference; use to score students' assessments)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Invite students to read the learning targets with you:

* "I can identify evidence of Laurence Yep's perspective on being Chinese in Dragonwings."

* "I can explain what connotative language is and identify the meaning of connotative language."

  • Remind students that these are the same learning targets they have been working with across the past four lessons. Today they will show how well they can demonstrate these targets independently in an assessment.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. They also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.
  • Discussing and clarifying the language of learning targets helps build academic vocabulary.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. End of Unit 1 Assessment (35 minutes)

  • Remind students of this quote from the opening excerpt: "When I wrote, I went from being a puzzle to a puzzle solver. I could reach into the box of rags that was my soul and begin stitching them together. Moreover, I could try out different combinations to see which one pleased me the most."
  • Ask students to discuss in triads:

* "What does he mean by this? How does he use writing?"

  • Select volunteers to share their ideas with the whole group. Listen for them to explain that he uses writing to make sense of his world and can often change things that happened in real life to make them better.
  • Explain that in this assessment, students will think about how Laurence Yep communicated his perspective on being Chinese (his regrets about his behavior toward his Chinese culture as a child) in Dragonwings. Remind them that if he regrets the way he behaved toward the Chinese culture as a child, he may communicate that perspective by making Moon Shadow behave in a different way. So rather than looking for evidence of Moon Shadow being ashamed of being Chinese, they are going to be looking for the opposite.
  • Distribute the End of Unit 1 Assessment: Finding Evidence of Laurence Yep's Perspective in Dragonwings and Determining Connotation. Invite students to read the directions at the top with you.
  • Remind students that they will need:
  • Being Chinese excerpt
  • Gathering Evidence of Laurence Yep's Perspective: Being Chinese graphic organizer, started in the previous lesson
  • Dragonwings book
  • Distribute evidence flags.  Record the page numbers and final sentence on the board for students to refer to.
  • Remind the class that because this is an assessment, it is to be completed independently. However, if students need assistance, they should raise their hand to speak with a teacher.
  • Circulate and support students as they work. During an assessment, your prompting should be minimal.
  • At the end of the time, collect the assessments.
  • If students receive accommodations for assessment, communicate with the cooperating service providers regarding the practices of instruction in use during this study, as well as the goals of the assessment.
  • For some students, this assessment may require more than the 35 minutes allotted. Consider providing students time over multiple days if necessary.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Concentric Circles: What Can We Learn from Laurence Yep? (8 minutes)

  • Congratulate students on the perseverance and stamina it takes to sit and analyze two texts.
  • Direct them to form two circles, an inside circle and an outside circle, standing face-to-face. If there is an odd number of students, join a circle so that everyone has someone to pair up with.
  • Ask the questions below in this sequence. Rotate after each question is asked.
  • "How do Moon Shadow and Miss Whitlaw see the dragons differently?"
  • "What does Yep want the reader to learn from these two different connotations of dragon?"
  • "How does Moon Shadow react to teasing by the neighborhood boys?"

* "What does Yep want the reader to learn about how we should treat people who are different from us?"

  • Developing self-assessment and reflection supports all learners.

Homework

Homework
  • Read Chapter 7 up to page 150, stopping near the end of the page after "Father and I excused ourselves and left." Answer this question in your structured notes:

* "What are the differences between how Miss Whitlaw views dragons and how Moon Shadow views dragons?"

  • Use evidence flags to identify three text details in this part of the chapter to support your answer.

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