Learning from the Narrator’s Point of View: Introducing Dragonwings | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M3A:U1:L1

Learning from the Narrator’s Point of View: Introducing Dragonwings

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can analyze how an author develops a narrator or speaker’s point of view. (RL.6.6)

Daily Learning Target

  • I can recognize Moon Shadow’s point of view concerning “demons” in Chapter 1 of Dragonwings.
  • I can locate text evidence of Moon Shadow’s point of view.
  • I can explain how Laurence Yep develops the point of view of Moon Shadow.
  • I can follow Triad Talk Expectations when I participate in a discussion.

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Reader: Introducing the Novel (5 minutes)

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Reading the First Pages of the Novel (10 minutes)

B. Analyzing Point of View: Moon Shadow’s Point of View of the “Land of the Golden Mountain” and the “Demons” (10 minutes)

C. Determining Author’s Techniques for Developing Point of View (10 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A.  Distribute Structured Notes and Word-catcher (5 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Finish reading Chapter 1 of Dragonwings. Record any new vocabulary on your word-catcher. As you read, use evidence flags to identify three text details from page 5 onward related to the focus question below. Code each flag as a thought, word, or action to show the technique that Laurence Yep was using to convey Moon Shadow’s point of view.

B. Answer the point of view focus question for Chapter 1 on your structured notes organizer, using the evidence from your flags:

* “What does Moon Shadow think about the Land of the Golden Mountain and the demons that live there?”

  • The primary focus of this unit is point of view, addressing standard RL.6.6. Students analyze the techniques that Laurence Yep uses to develop the point of view of Moon Shadow, the narrator in the novel Dragonwings.
  • In this lesson, students are introduced to the novel by reading pages 1–5. They also are introduced to the concept of point of view. Together, the class completes an anchor chart as they analyze point of view in the first five pages of the novel. The anchor chart prepares students for the graphic organizer they will use in later lessons to independently analyze point of view. This lesson focuses on the character Moon Shadow’s point of view of the “Land of the Golden Mountain” and the “demons.”
  • Help students distinguish between the basic meaning of “point of view” (e.g. “perspective”) from the literary terms used to describe the point of view of a character (e.g. “1st person,” “third person,” etc.).  The latter is address in a 4th grade standard (RL.4.6), but may need to be reviewed. The basic meaning will be more heavily emphasized throughout this module.
  • This lesson opens with an activity that helps students imagine “stepping into” the world of the novel. As suits the needs of your class, build up this activity to engage students’ imaginations. 
  • At the end of the lesson, students are given a Structured Notes note catcher on which to record their homework. Students can either fill out their answers to the focus question on the handout or they can copy the note catcher into journals, whichever you would prefer. The homework focus question is given at the end of the lesson and also on the reading calendar.
  • In advance: Create triads, groups of three students who will work together to read, think, talk, and write about Dragonwings and other texts. Be intentional in placing students in groups that are different from their previous triads.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

point of view, first person, third person, omniscient, evidence, technique; lynched (1)

 

Materials

  • Triad Talk Expectations anchor chart (from Module 1, Unit 1, Lesson 2)
  • Dragonwings by Laurence Yep (book; one per student)
  • Equity sticks
  • Basic Questions for Moon Shadow (one to display)
  • Basic Questions for Moon Shadow (answers for teacher reference)
  • Point of View anchor chart: Chapter 1 (new; teacher-created; see supporting materials)
  • Thought, Word, Action symbols (for teacher reference)
  • Structured notes (one per student)
  • Word-catcher (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Introducing the Novel  (5 minutes)

    • Post the list of new triads and invite students to get into their groups. Tell them that they will work with these students for the duration of this unit.
    • Review the Triad Talk Expectations anchor chart from Module 1.
    • Show students the novel Dragonwings and frame the module by telling them that this novel is going to be a journey to a place in the past, with the narrator as our guide.
    • Invite two students to form an arch and put the student novels in a stack behind the arch. Tell students that they are going to walk through the arch, which is a time portal, to meet the narrator and dig into the novel. Invite them to walk through and get their individual texts.
    • Focus students on the cover of the book. Ask them to discuss in their triads:

* “Based on the cover and the title, what do you think this book will be about? Why?”

    • Select volunteers to share their ideas with the whole group.
    • Invite students to read the blurb on the back of the book silently in their heads as you read it aloud. Ask triads to discuss:

 * “So what do you know about the book now? What is the book about? Were any of your predictions accurate?”

    • Cold call students to share their triad discussions with the whole group.
  • Heterogeneous groups support students in discussing texts and answering questions about text.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets  (5 minutes)

    • Invite students to read the learning targets with you:

* “I can recognize Moon Shadow’s point of view concerning ‘demons’ in Chapter 1 of Dragonwings.”

* “I can locate text evidence of Moon Shadow’s point of view.”

* “I can explain how Laurence Yep develops the point of view of Moon Shadow.”

* “I can follow Triad Talk Expectations when I participate in a discussion.”

    • Ask triads to discuss:

* “What are the important words or phrases in the learning targets? Why do you think those are important?”

    • Cold call students to share their responses and circle the words and phrases they suggest. Make sure “point of view” and “evidence” are circled. 
    • Focus students on point of view. Ask triads to discuss:

* “What does point of view mean? Consider using equity sticks to select students to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that people have different ways of looking at things. Your point of view is your way of looking at things.

    • Tell students that in literature, every story is told from a point of view. It can be a first-person point of view, using a narrator as the “I” or “me” telling the story; a third-person point of view, in which an author tells the story without a narrator, describing characters using “he” or “she”; and a third-person omniscient point of view, in which an author captures the point of view of all the characters.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reading the First Pages of the Novel (10 minutes).

    • Tell students that they now will begin reading Dragonwings with you. Tell them to read along silently in their heads as you read the first paragraph of the first page, up to “set foot on their shores.”
    • Ask triads to discuss:

*“Is this first person, third person, or third person omniscient?

    • How do you know?”
    • Listen for students to explain that it is first person because there is a narrator who speaks from the perspective of “I.”
    • Continue reading to the bottom of page 4, up to “Just the two of us would go.” Display the Basic Questions for Moon Shadow. Invite the class to read the questions with you.
    • Ask triads to discuss:

* “How would Moon Shadow answer these questions?”

    • Circulate to ensure that students are able to answer the basic questions; point them back to the text with a question that directs them to a specific sentence if they get stuck. If needed, refer to Basic Questions for Moon Shadow(answers for teacher reference) in the supporting materials.
    • Ask triads to discuss:

* “Where do you think the Land of the Golden Mountain is? Why do you think that?”

* “Who do you think these people he calls ‘demons’ are? Why?”

    • Invite students to synthesize their learning so far about Moon Shadow, the Land of the Golden Mountain, and “demons” by writing a few sentences to answer the question:

* “What do you know about Moon Shadow, the Land of the Golden Mountain, and ‘demons?’

  • Hearing a complex text read slowly, fluently, and without interruption or explanation promotes fluency for students. They are hearing a strong reader read the text aloud with accuracy and expression and are simultaneously looking at and thinking about the words on the printed page. Set clear expectations that students read along silently in their heads as you read the text aloud.
  • Asking students to write their initial thinking and learning after reading a text can help them to synthesize.

 

B. Analyzing Point of View: Moon Shadow’s Point of View of the “Land of the Golden Mountain” and the “Demons” (10 minutes)

    • Focus students whole group. Remind them of the learning target about point of view. Tell them that they are going to begin by focusing on something Moon Shadow brings up right away and often: the “Land of the Golden Mountain” and the “demons.”
    • Focus students on the new Point of View anchor chart: Chapter 1 Focus students on the first column header, Claim. Explain that they are going to begin by making a claim about Moon Shadow’s point of view of the Land of the Golden Mountain.
    • Focus students on the questions at the top of the first two columns of the anchor chart, particularly on the Land of the Golden Mountain. Ask:

* “What is Moon Shadow’s point of view of the Land of the Golden Mountain? What does he think of it? How do you know? What evidence in the text supports your claim?”

    • Ask students to reread up to the end of page 4 with those questions in mind and then share their claim with their triad.
    • Consider using equity sticks to select students to share their claim about Moon Shadow’s point of view of the Land of the Golden Mountain and to support it with evidence from the text. Record student claims in the first column of the anchor chart and the evidence they cite in the middle column. Examples could include:

*  He thought the Land of the Golden Mountain was dangerous. Page 1: “There was plenty of money to be made among the demons, but it was also dangerous. My own grandfather had been lynched about thirty years before by a mob of white demons almost the moment he had set foot on their shores.”

*  He was curious about the Land of the Golden Mountain. Page 2: “I was curious about the Land of the Golden Mountain mainly because my father was there.”

    • Distribute word-catcher. Students should be familiar with the word-catcher, so you will only need to remind them how to fill it out. Ask:

* “What is Moon Shadow’s point of view of the demons? What does he think of them? How do you know?”

* “What evidence in the text supports your claim?”

* “What does lynched mean?”

    • Invite volunteers to share their responses and ask students to record the word on their word-catchers.
    • Ask students to reread up to the end of page 4 with those questions in mind and then to share their claim with their triad.
    • Consider using equity sticks to select students to share their claim about Moon Shadow’s point of view of the demons and to support it with evidence from the text. Record student claims in the first column of the anchor chart and their evidence in the middle column. Examples could include the following:

*  He thought the demons were bad people. Page 1: “My own grandfather had been lynched about thirty years before by a mob of white demons almost the moment he had set foot on their shores.”

    *  He thought that the demons did not want people from China settling there permanently. Pages 2 and 3: “The white demons would not let wives join their husbands on the Golden Mountain because they did not want us settling there permanently.”

      *  Demons have boring names. Page 3: “Demon names sound so drab compared to ours.”

      • Guiding questions provide motivation for student engagement in the topic and give a purpose to reading a text closely.
      • Anchor charts serve as note-catchers when the class is co-constructing ideas.
      • Giving students the opportunity to discuss answers to questions in small groups before asking them to share with the whole group can ensure that all are able to contribute to the whole group discussion.

      C. Determining Author’s Techniques for Developing Point of View (10 minutes)

        • Draw students’ attention to the final column on the Point of View anchor chart, Technique. Explain that technique is about how Laurence Yep, the novel’s author, has developed a point of view. Tell students that now that they have identified Moon Shadow’s point of view about the Land of the Golden Mountain and the demons, they will consider how the author has developed that point of view.
        • Ask students to look at the first claim on the anchor chart and the evidence with it, then discuss with their triads:

      * “How did Laurence Yep develop this point of view? Is it through the narrator’s words, thoughts, or actions? Is it through another character’s words or actions?”

        • Select volunteers to share their responses and write thoughts, words, and actions of Moon Shadow in one color, and words and actions of other characters in a different color.
        • In the final Technique column on the anchor chart, draw a thought bubble symbol next to thoughts, a speech bubble symbol next to speech, and an arrow next to actions (see Thought, Word, Action symbols in the supporting materials).
        • Repeat for all of the other claims and evidence on the anchor chart.
        • Ask students to synthesize their learning about the techniques an author uses to develop point of view. Select students to share their ideas whole group:

      *  “So what do you now know about the techniques an author uses to develop point of view? What techniques does Laurence Yep use to develop Moon Shadow’s point of view at the beginning of this chapter?”

      Closing & Assessments

      Closing

      A. Distribute Structured Notes and Word-catcher (5 minutes)

      • Distribute the structured notes students will need for homework.
      • Tell them that each night they will have a point of view focus question for homework, based on the chapter they are reading. They are to record the chapter number, the answer to the question, and evidence to support their answer in the appropriate column.
      • If time allows, invite students to continue reading Chapter 1 of Dragonwings. Remind them to fill out their word-catcher with any new vocabulary.

      Homework

      Homework
      • Read the Author’s Note and complete the Author’s Note homework assignment.
      • Finish reading Chapter 1 of Dragonwings. Record any new vocabulary on your word-catcher. As you read, use evidence flags to identify three text details from page 5 onward related to the focus question below. Code each flag as a thought, word, or action to show the technique that Laurence Yep was using to convey Moon Shadow’s point of view.
      • Answer the point of view focus question for Chapter 1 on your structured notes organizer using the evidence from your flags:

      * “What does Moon Shadow think about the Land of the Golden Mountain and the demons that live there?”

       

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