Writing the Final Narrative: Monologue or Concrete Poem | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M2B:U3:L9

Writing the Final Narrative: Monologue or Concrete Poem

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can write narrative texts about real or imagined experiences using relevant details and event sequences that make sense. (W.6.3)
  • I can use correct grammar and usage when writing or speaking. (L.6.1)
  • I can use a variety of sentence structures to make my writing and speaking more interesting. (L.6.3)
  • I can present evidence and details in a logical order. (SL.6.4)
  • I can support my evidence with descriptive details. (SL.6.4)
  • I can use effective speaking techniques, appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation. (SL.6.4)
  • I can adapt my speech for a variety of contexts and tasks, using formal English when indicated or appropriate. (SL.6.6)

Supporting Targets

  • I can use correct grammar and word usage when writing my narrative.
  • I can use a variety of sentence structures to create my narrative.
  • I can present evidence and details in a logical order in my narrative performance.
  • I can use descriptive details to create an image of the evidence in my narrative.
  • I can use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation to convey the message in my narrative.
  • I can adapt my speech to fit the context of my narrative.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Reading Tracker and Reviewer's Notes
  • Writing of narrative monologue
  • Writing of concrete poem
  • Performance task practice

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Mini Lesson: Common Errors and Revisions (5 minutes)

B. Writing the Final Narrative (23 minutes)

C. Preparing for the Performance Task (5 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Performance Practice with Partner (10 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Read independently for your goal.

B. Complete your Reading Tracker and Reviewer's Notes.

C. Practice your narrative performance.

  • In Lesson 8, students finished their narrative draft. Students selected the format for giving voice to their own or a peer's adversity in a modern world: either a narrative monologue or a concrete poem. In this lesson, students write their final, best version of their narrative.
  • Return students' narrative drafts, as well as a Narrative of Adversity Criteria checklist with feedback for each student. While providing feedback, make note of common errors across students' papers. Use this information to plan the mini lesson in Work Time A. This mini lesson requires you to make example sentences that contain the errors. Be sure to create original sentences rather than using student work.
  • Before students practice performing their narratives, they will watch a video segment of Malala Yousafzai's speech at the United Nations Youth Assembly. Viewing this excerpt provides the opportunity for students to see the importance of eye contact, volume, pronunciation, and body language when conveying a message through speech.
  • During the Closing and Assessment of this lesson, students prepare for the performance task. They review the Monologue Delivery Criteria and rehearse their performance with a partner.
  • If students used computers in the previous lessons to write and revise their drafts, allow them to use computers for the final version of their narrative. If computers are unavailable, have lined paper ready to distribute.
  • In advance:

-    Preview the video clip of Malala Yousafzai's speech to the United Nations Youth Assembly. Cue up the video to start at 2:56 and end at 5:55: http://webtv.un.org/watch/malala-yousafzai-addresses-united-nations-youth-assembly/2542094251001/.

-    Review the text of Malala Yousafzai's speech if necessary: https://secure.aworldatschool.org/page/content/the-text-of-malala-yousafzais-speech-at-the-united-nations.

-    Consider providing examples and/or criteria for exemplary craftsmanship of final versions of concrete poems or narrative monologues.

-    Make arrangements for students' performances, including any audio or visual technology. Consider creating an atmosphere that contributes to the mood and tone of performing themes of adversity. For example: lighting, background, easels or bulletin board space to display props or concrete poems, seating arrangements for audience, display photos of famous speakers, and/or copies of speeches or concrete poems.

-    Prepare the Academic Word Wall.

-    Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

eye contact, volume, pronunciation, body language, gestures

Materials

  • Teacher-made examples of errors (see Teaching Notes)
  • Document camera
  • Students' drafts of narratives (from Lesson 8, returned in this lesson with teacher feedback)
  • Narrative of Adversity Criteria checklist (from Lesson 8, returned in this lesson with teacher feedback)
  • Lined paper (several pieces per student)
  • Academic Word Wall (begun in Unit 2, Lesson 14)
  • Academic Word Wall (from Unit 2, Lesson 14; for Unit 2 Lessons 14 and 15 and all Unit 3 lessons; for teacher reference)
  • Video of Malala Yousafzai's speech to the United Nations Youth Assembly (see Teaching Notes)
  • Narrative of Adversity Writing Rubric (from Lesson 10; one per student)
  • Reading Tracker and Reviewer's Notes (from Unit 2, Lesson 14)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the learning targets and read the first two aloud:

* "I can use correct grammar and word usage when writing my narrative."

* "I can use a variety of sentence structures to create my narrative."

  • Ask students:

* "Based on these learning targets, what writing skills will you use as you write your final narrative today?"

  • Cold call students to share. Listen for students to explain that they will make grammar and word usage revisions and improve sentence structure.
  • Tell students they will get feedback on their narrative drafts to guide them as they make their final writing revisions.
  • Redirect students' attention to the posted learning targets and read the remaining targets aloud:

* "I can present evidence and details in a logical order in my narrative performance."

* "I can use descriptive details to create an image of the evidence in my narrative performance."

* "I can use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation to convey the message in my narrative."

* "I can adapt my speech to fit the context of my narrative."

  • Circle the following words in the learning targets: evidence, details, logical order, descriptive details, and image.
  • Tell students the techniques they use in their writing are important in their performances as well.
  • Tell students to look closely at the last two learning targets and ask:

* "When performing narratives, what is important for speakers to do?"

  • Responses should include making eye contact with the audience, using volume so the audience can hear you, pronouncing words clearly, and adapting or changing your voice to fit the message.
  • Tell students they will have the opportunity to use those speaking strategies when they practice their narrative performance.
  • Remind them that each of their voices is important. Doing their best work in their writing and in their performance gives them an opportunity to share their challenge and give others the chance to read and listen to their message.
  • Posting the learning targets provides a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.
  • Engaging students in unpacking the learning targets increases their awareness, understanding, and ownership of the intended learning goals.
  • Consider selecting struggling students ahead of time to read the learning targets. Provide the opportunity to practice reading the targets in advance.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Mini Lesson: Common Errors and Revisions (5 minutes)

  • Tell students that you have reviewed their narrative drafts, and you have noticed some common errors in their writing (for instance: inconsistent capitalization, incorrect use of pronouns, incorrect punctuation).
  • Select one or two common errors that you noticed when assessing students' writing.
  • Display teacher-made examples of errors, not actual student work.
  • Explain why each error is incorrect.
  • Using a document camera, model how to revise and correct the errors.
  • Check for understanding after modeling each type of error. Ask students to use the Thumb-O-Meter to gauge their understanding: A thumbs-up means they understand the error and how to fit it; a thumbs-down means they don't understand; and a thumbs-sideways means they somewhat understand.
  • If several students give a thumbs-down or a thumbs-sideways, show another example of the error.
  • Ask students to think about how to fix it.
  • Cold call a student to suggest how to correct it. If the answer is incorrect, clarify. Again, ask students to use the Thumb-o-Meter to gauge their comfort level.
  • Tell students they will now have the opportunity to look for these errors in their own writing and make the corrections and revisions as they write the final version of their narrative.
  • Providing models of expected work supports all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Consider providing copies of modeled revisions and corrections to be used as a reference for students who struggle with those errors.

B. Writing the Final Narrative (23 minutes)

  • Return students' drafts of narratives, alongwith a Narrative of Adversity Criteria checklist (with teacher feedback) for each student.
  • Ask students to look over the comments and make sure they understand them.
  • Invite students to raise their hands to ask questions if they have them. Alternatively, create a "Help List" on the board and invite students to add their names to it if they need questions answered.
  • Distribute lined paper.
  • Ask students to take some time to revise their narratives based on your feedback, as well as on their new knowledge from the mini lesson. Tell them to make their revisions directly on their drafts. Once they have finished their revisions, they should rewrite their narrative on the lined paper you distributed. This means they will have produced a new, polished version of their narrative.
  • Remind students that because this is part of an assessment, they will write their narrative independently. Ask them to begin.
  • Circulate to observe.
  • At the end of the writing time, refocus students whole group.
  • Tell students they will keep this polished version of their narrative to use during the performance practice and for their final performance in Lesson 10.
  • Recognize students for efforts and concentrated focus to produce their best writing.
  • Consider providing individualized or small-group support to students struggling with writing their narratives as the class writes their final version.
  • Students who have selected the concrete poem format may need additional time to complete the graphics or text arrangement. Consider options for providing that opportunity.
  • Consider arrangements for students who have not finished their final drafts to complete them.

C. Preparing for the Performance Task (5 minutes)

  • Remind students that today's learning targets included skills that are important for sharing their voice. As they practice for their performances, they will use those speaking skills to convey the adversity they wrote about in the way they would like it to be heard.
  • Direct students' attention to the Academic Word Wall. Point out the Lesson 9 words that have been added.
  • Briefly review:

-    eye contact - looking directly at the eyes of people in the audience

-    volume - adjusting the loudness or sound of their voice so it can be heard

-    pronunciation - saying the words correctly

-    body language - how they move or position their body helps convey their message

-    gestures - how they move or use their hands and arms to emphasize an idea or feeling

  • Tell students they will watch a short video clip of Malala Yousafzai, a girl from Pakistan who is speaking to the United Nations Youth Assembly on her 16th birthday. Explain that a group called the Taliban had banned girls from going to school in her country. She spoke out about women's right to an education. One day, on the way home from school, she was shot in the head by Taliban gunmen, but she survived. A year after being shot, Malala was invited to speak to the United Nations about the adversity that girls and women in her country faced as a result of being banned from going to school.
  • Ask students to watch and listen for her use of eye contactvolumepronunciation, and body language as she speaks. Invite students to consider how those skills help Malala express her message.
  • Show the video of Malala Yousafzai's speech to the United Nations Youth Assembly.
  • Cold call students to share what they noticed.
  • Emphasize the strength and importance of these speaking skills for conveying a message.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Performance Practice with Partner (10 minutes)

  • Form partnerships for practicing the performance of their narratives. Partnerships should be based on students' narrative choice (narrative or concrete poem).
  • Distribute and display the Narrative of Adversity Writing Rubric. Invite students to look at the Monologue Delivery Criteria section of the rubric as you review the criteria aloud.
  • Ask students to practice performing their narrative, referring to the Monologue Delivery Criteria for guidance. Once they are done presenting, partners should provide feedback in the form of one star and one step.
  • Circulate to support.

Homework

Homework
  • Read independently for your goal. Complete your Reading Tracker and Reviewer's Notes.
  • Practice your performance.

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