Mid-Unit Assessment: Theme, Figurative Language, and Word Choice in Good Masters! Sweet Ladies! | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M2B:U2:L8

Mid-Unit Assessment: Theme, Figurative Language, and Word Choice in Good Masters! Sweet Ladies!

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can determine a theme based on details in a literary text. (RL.6.2)
  • I can summarize a literary text using only information from the text. (RL.6.2)
  • I can determine the meaning of literal and figurative language (metaphors and similes) in literary text. (RL.6.4)
  • I can analyze how an author's word choice affects tone and meaning in a literary text. (RL.6.4)
  • I can analyze how a particular sentence, stanza, scene, or chapter fits in and contributes to the development of a literary text. (RL.6.5)
  • I can analyze figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. (L.6.5)
  • I can interpret figures of speech in context (e.g., personification). (L.6.5a)
  • I can use the relationship between particular words to better understand each of the words (e.g., cause/effect, part/whole, item/category).(L.6.5b)
  • I can distinguish among the connotations (associations) of words with similar denotations (definitions) (e.g., stingy, scrimping, economical, unwasteful, thrifty). (L.6.5c)

Supporting Targets

  • I can read the monologue "Pask, the Runaway" for flow and for gist.
  • I can determine a theme based on details in the monologue "Pask, the Runaway."
  • I can determine the meaning of figurative language in the monologue "Pask, the Runaway."
  • I can analyze how the author's word choice affects the tone of the monologue "Pask, the Runaway."
  • I can analyze how a single stanza adds to the whole monologue.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Mid-Unit Assessment: Theme, Figurative Language, and Word Choice

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Mid-Unit Assessment (40 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Reflecting on the Learning Targets (3 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Read the other three monologues from the Jigsaw. The four monologues involved in the Jigsaw were "Will, the Plowboy," "Constance, the Pilgrim," "Otho, the Miller's Son," and "Lowdy, the Varlet's Child."

  • In this mid-unit assessment, students read the monologue "Pask, the Runaway" in Good Masters! Sweet Ladies! They are asked to determine the themes of adversity, identify and interpret figurative language, and consider how the author's word choice affects tone and theme development. They will use graphic organizers identical to the ones they have been using to track theme and figurative language in previous lessons. Students are then asked a series of short constructed-response questions about word choice.
  • For some students, this assessment may require more than the 40 minutes allotted. Consider providing time over multiple days if necessary.
  • The two-point rubric for scoring short responses is included to guide teachers in assessing the short answer questions.
  • If students receive accommodations for assessment, communicate with the cooperative service providers regarding the practices of instruction in use during this study as well as the goals of the assessment.
  • If students finish their assessment early, they may go back and read the three monologues from the Jigsaw lessons that they did not read.
  • In advance: Consider students who need testing accommodations: extra time, separate location, scribe, etc.
  • Post: Learning targets on charts around the room.  Each learning target should have two columns below it labeled "Star" and "Step."  These will be used in the lesson to help students self-assess their progress.  (See supporting materials). 

Vocabulary

excerpt, assessment, flow, gist, theme, figurative language, word choice, tone, stanza

Materials

  • Mid-Unit Assessment: Part 1, Themes of Adversity (one per student)
  • Mid-Unit Assessment: Parts 2a and 2b, Figurative Language and Word Choice in Good MastersSweet Ladies! (one per student)
  • Good Masters! Sweet Ladies! (book; one per student)
  • Sticky notes (five per student)
  • Mid-Unit Assessment: Part 1, Themes of Adversity (answers, for teacher reference)
  • Mid-Unit Assessment Parts 2a and Part 2b (answers, for teacher reference)
  • Two-Point Rubric (for teacher reference)
  • Chart paper for Learning Targets Stars and Steps chart (5 charts; one for each target; see Teaching Notes) 

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and invite two volunteers to read them aloud:

* "I can read the monologue 'Pask, the Runaway' for flow and for gist."

* "I can determine a theme based on details in the monologue 'Pask, the Runaway.'"

* "I can determine the meaning of figurative language in the monologue 'Pask, the Runaway.'"

* "I can analyze how the author's word choice affects the tone of the monologue 'Pask, the Runaway.'"

* "I can analyze how a single stanza adds to the whole mongue."

  • Underline the key vocabulary words and phrases: flowgistthemefigurative languageword choicetone, and stanza.
  • Remind students that these targets are very similar to the targets they have been working on for a number of days. Today, they will show how well they have mastered these targets on an independent assessment. Explain that the assessment will ask them to do many of the things they have done in previous lessons. 
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged leaners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The targets also provide reminders to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.
  • Discussing and clarifying the language of learning targets helps build academic vocabulary.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Mid-Unit Assessment (40 minutes)

  • Distribute the following to each student:

-    Mid-Unit Assessment: Part 1, Themes of Adversity,

-    Mid-Unit Assessment Part 2a and Part 2b, Figurative Language and Word Choice in Good Masters! Sweet Ladies!

  • Tell students that in this assessment, they will focus on the monologue they read last night for homework: "Pask, the Runaway" from Good Masters! Sweet Ladies! They will be asked to interpret literal and figurative language, as well as how the author's word choice affects the tone of the monologue.
  • Invite students to open Good Masters! Sweet Ladies! to page 62.
  • Remind them of all of their great discussions in the previous lessons. Note that their discussions analyzing theme, figurative language, and word choice helped them to understand how the author of Good Masters! Sweet Ladies! brought the monologues to life, and this work served as great preparation for this assessment.
  • Tell students that "Pask, the Runaway" is written in prose. It is not as poetic as some of the other monologues. This, perhaps, reflects the idea that Pask was born in a lower social class.
  • Remind the class that because this is an assessment, it is to be completed independently. However, if students need assistance, they should raise their hand to speak with a teacher.
  • Tell students they will have 35 minutes to complete this assessment.
  • Circulate and support them as they work. During an assessment, your prompting should be minimal.
  • After 35 minutes, collect the assessments.
  • If students receive accommodations for assessment, communicate with the cooperating service providers regarding the practices of instruction in use during this study, as well as the goals of the assessment.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Reflecting on the Learning Targets (3 minutes)

  • Distribute five sticky notes to each student. Ask them to write their name on each of the sticky notes. Point out each of Learning Targets Stars and Steps charts posted around the room. Tell students you are going to read aloud each of the learning targets on which they were assessed.
  • Ask students to reflect on each learning target as you read it aloud. Ask them to consider whether the target is a "star" or a "step." Explain that a "star" means they feel accomplished with the learning target, and a "step" is an area to continue to focus on.
  • Read each learning target:

* "I can read the monologue 'Pask, the Runaway' for flow and for gist."

* "I can determine a theme based on details in the monologue 'Pask, the Runaway.'"

* "I can determine the meaning of figurative language in the monologue 'Pask, the Runaway.'"

* "I can analyze how the author's word choice affects the tone of the monologue 'Pask, the Runaway.'"

* "I can analyze how a single stanza adds to the whole monologue."

  • Invite students to post their sticky notes in the "star" or "step" section of each displayed learning target. Explain the importance of giving careful consideration to each target, since these targets will continue to be an area of focus in the second half of Unit 2 and in Unit 3.

Homework

Homework
  • Read the other three monologues from the Jigsaw (in other words, the three monologues your triad did not focus on in depth). The four monologues involved in the Jigsaw were "Will, the Plowboy," "Constance, the Pilgrim," "Otho, the Miller's Son," and "Lowdy, the Varlet's Child."

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