Close Read, Part 2: “Taggot, the Blacksmith’s Daughter" | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M2B:U2:L5

Close Read, Part 2: “Taggot, the Blacksmith’s Daughter"

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can determine the meaning of literal and figurative language (metaphors and similes) in literary text. (RL.6.4)
  • I can analyze how an author's word choice affects tone and meaning in a literary text. (RL.6.4)
  • I can analyze how a particular sentence, stanza, scene, or chapter fits in and contributes to the development of a literary text. (RL.6.5)
  • I can demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relations, and nuances in word meanings. (L.6.5)
  • I can interpret figures of speech in context. (L.6.5a)
  • I can use the relationship between particular words to better understand each of the words. (L.6.5b)
  • I can distinguish among the connotations (associations) of words with similar denotations (definitions). (L.6.5c)

Supporting Targets

  • I can determine the meaning of figurative language in the monologue "Taggot, the Blacksmith's Daughter."
  • I can analyze how the author's word choice affects the tone of the monologue "Taggot, the Blacksmith's Daughter."
  • I can analyze how a single stanza (or sentence) adds to the whole monologue.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for "Mogg, the Villein's Daughter" (from homework)
  • Figurative Language graphic organizer for "Taggot, the Blacksmith's Daughter"
  • Text-Dependent Questions: "Taggot, the Blacksmith's Daughter"
  • Exit Ticket: Literal to Figurative, Simile and Metaphors

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Themes of Adversity and Figurative Language: "Mogg, the Villein's Daughter" (7 minutes)

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (3 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Identifying Figurative Language: "Taggot, the Blacksmith's Daughter" (15 minutes)

B. Word Choice and Tone: "Taggot, the Blacksmith's Daughter" (15 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Changing Figurative to Literal and Literal to Figurative (5 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Read "Jack, the Half-Wit" and complete the Themes of Adversity graphic organizer.

  • Students begin this lesson in their triads discussing the themes of adversity in "Mogg, the Villein's Daughter," which they read for homework.
  • In this lesson, students review figurative and literal language and practice identifying examples from song lyrics.  
  • This lesson follows a similar pattern to previous lessons in which students worked with partners to analyze figurative language and identify the ways word choice can affect tone and meaning.
  • Students further their work on figurative and literal language by completing an exit ticket.
  • In advance:

-    Form student partnerships.

-    Write four quotes from "Taggot, the Blacksmith's Daughter" on the Figurative Language anchor chart.

-    Add to the Academic Word Wall: connotationdenotation, and nuance.

  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

figurative language, figures of speech, literal language, metaphor, simile, personification, word choice, tone, connotation, denotation, nuance

Materials

  • Good Masters! Sweet Ladies! (book; one per student)
  • Document camera
  • Themes of Adversity anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2)
  • Academic Word Wall (begun in Lesson 2; see Lesson 2 supporting material for teacher reference)
  • Figurative and Literal Language reference sheet (from Lesson 3)
  • Figurative Language graphic organizer for "Taggot, the Blacksmith's Daughter" (one per student and one to display)
  • Text-Dependent Questions: "Taggot, the Blacksmith's Daughter" (one per student and one to display)
  • Close Reading Guide: "Taggot, the Blacksmith's Daughter" (for teacher reference)
  • Exit Ticket: Literal to Figurative, Simile and Metaphors (one per student)
  • Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for "Jack, the Half-Wit" (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Themes of Adversity and Figurative Language: "Mogg, the Villein's Daughter" (7 minutes)

  •  Ask students to gather their book Good Masters! Sweet Ladies! and their Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for "Mogg, The Villein's Daughter" and sit with in their triads.
  • Using a document camera, display the Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for "Mogg, The Villein's Daughter."
  • Ask triads to discuss one theme of adversity Mogg faced, the text-based evidence supporting the adversity (including page number), and the group of people affected by the adversity.
  • Circulate and provide support. Ask probing questions, if needed:

* "What challenge or problem do Mogg and her family face?"

* "What does it mean when the author says, 'He can't lift his hand'? What challenge or adversity does this statement suggest?"

  • Remind students to record new thinking on their graphic organizer.
  • Refocus whole group. Ask for volunteers to share out.
  • Listen for student comments that are versions of the following:
  • One of the challenges Mogg is confronted with is abuse. Mogg's father abused her brother, Jack, and her mother. On page 25 Mogg says, "He beat Jack, and the lad is a half-wit." She adds, "Mother can only see from one eye."
  • Another theme of adversity Mogg and her family faced was alcoholism. Mogg's father drank. On page 25 Mogg says, "He wasn't a good man, always ale-drunk."
  • A third adversity Mogg's family was confronted with was the death of her father, their provider. Mogg's brother, Jack, faced personal challenges. As a result, Mogg and her mother were left to provide for the family.
  • Add these themes to the Themes of Adversity anchor chart.
  • Cold call triads to share the group of people affected by these challenges or adversities of Mogg and her family.
  • Listen for: "Mogg's entire family as well as other serfs in a similar position."
  • Cold call triads to share their responses from the third column of the organizer: "Do these adversities exist today?"
  • Listen for: "Some families are confronted with poverty, alcoholism, death of a parent, and/or abuse."
  • Many students will benefit from seeing the Themes of Adversity graphic organizer displayed to help them focus on the task.
  • Reviewing homework holds all students accountable for reading the monologue and completing their homework.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (3 minutes)

  • Invite students to read the learning targets with you:

* "I can determine the meaning of figurative language in the monologue 'Taggot, the Blacksmith's Daughter.'"

* "I can analyze how the author's word choice affects the tone of the monologue 'Taggot, the Blacksmith's Daughter.'"

* "I can analyze how a single stanza (or sentence) adds to the whole monologue."

  • Remind students that figurative language, literal language, word choice, tone, and stanza were discussed in Lesson 3. Underline these words in the targets and point out their definitions on the Academic Word Wall.
  • Share that precise words were chosen to convey or reveal the attitude and feelings of the main character. The word choice created tone. For example, the author chose to name Mogg's cow Paradise. The word paradise has a connotation, or an association, of being positive and harmonious. The tone conveyed is one of happiness. Paradise provided a life of happiness for Mogg and her family: milk for the market, a calf for the spring, dung to patch the roof, and a warm body to sleep next to in the winter.
  • Also share that when the author uses the literal meanings of words to communicate meaning, it is a denotation. For example, Schlitz writes, "Mother kissed his hand, and we watched him ride off, and waited till dark, to take back Paradise." This reference is considered literal because Mogg's family would take their cow back.
  • Tell students that authors also use nuance in writing, which is a subtle difference in word choice. For example, an author might write, "Her giggle was childlike" or "Her laughter was childish." Each communicates a different meaning because of the words childlike and childish.
  • Explain that all of these word choices were made by the author after careful consideration.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Identifying Figurative Language: "Taggot, the Blacksmith's Daughter" (15 minutes)

  • Ask students to take out their Figurative and Literal Language reference sheets and display a copy using the document camera.
  • Form student partnerships.
  • Tell students they are now going to look closely at four examples of figurative language from "Taggot, the Blacksmith's Daughter."
  • Distribute the Figurative Language graphic organizer for "Taggot, the Blacksmith's Daughter" and display a copy using the document camera. Remind students that this figurative language activity was introduced in Lesson 3.
  • Explain that the first column contains examples of figurative language from the monologue. Ask students to use their Figurative and Literal Language reference sheets to identify the type of figure of speech. Tell students that in Column 2 they define the literal meaning of the figurative language, and in Column 3 they should explain how the word choice adds to the understanding of the scene or character.
  • Circulate and support students as they determine the literal meanings of each example. Make note of those who need additional support.
  • Cold call partners to share their literal meanings and how they add to the understanding of the scene or character.
  • Listen for comments such as the following:

-    "'The morn was clear as glass, and I was happy as a singing bird' is a simile,

-    'His eyes were as dark as rivers' is a simile, and

-    'The glory was his face' is a metaphor. '

-    I never did speak. I thought if I opened my mouth he'd know my whole heart' is an example of imagery."

  • After discussion of Columns 2 and 3, share with students that they will continue analyzing Laura Amy Schlitz's word choice in a close read of "Taggot, the Blacksmith's Daughter." 
  • Consider partnering ELLs who speak the same home language when discussion of complex content is required. This can allow them to have more meaningful discussions and clarify points in their native language.

B. Word Choice and Tone: "Taggot, the Blacksmith's Daughter" (15 minutes)

  • Invite students to sit in triads.
  • Remind them that in Lesson 4, they did four readings of Taggot. Today, they will continue to look closely at the monologue, but this time they will shift their attention to word choice.
  • Distribute the Text-Dependent Questions:"Taggot, the Blacksmith's Daughter."
  • Using a document camera, display a copy of the Text-Dependent Questions: "Taggot, the Blacksmith's Daughter" to model recording responses as you guide the class through the document.
  • Refer to the Close Reading Guide: "Taggot, the Blacksmith's Daughter" (for teacher reference) to guide the discussion.
  • When reviewing graphic organizers or recording forms, consider using a document camera to display them for students who struggle with auditory processing.
  • Providing models of expected work supports all learners, especially those who are challenged.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Changing Figurative to Literal and Literal to Figurative (5 minutes)

  • Distribute the Exit Ticket: Figurative and Literal Language.
  • Invite students to read the examples of the similes and metaphors with you.
  • Ask them to Think-Pair-Share:

* "What is the literal language for each simile and metaphor?"

  • Call on volunteers to share.
  • Ask students to create their own simile and metaphor using the literal example.
  • Distribute Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for "Jack, the Half-Wit" for homework.

Homework

Homework
  • Read "Jack, the Half-Wit" and complete the Themes of Adversity graphic organizer.

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