Close Read, Part 1: “Taggot, the Blacksmith’s Daughter” | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M2B:U2:L4

Close Read, Part 1: “Taggot, the Blacksmith’s Daughter”

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite text-based evidence to support an analysis of literary text. (RL.6.1)
  • I can determine a theme based on details in a literary text. (RL.6.2)
  • I can use the relationship between particular words to better understand each of the words. (L.6.5b)
  • I can distinguish among the connotations (associations) of words with similar denotations (definitions). (L.6.5c)

Supporting Targets

  • I can read the monologue "Taggot, the Blacksmith's Daughter" for flow and for gist.
  • I can determine the themes of the monologue "Taggot, the Blacksmith's Daughter."

Ongoing Assessment

  • Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for "Thomas, the Doctor's Son" (from homework)
  • Reading for gist notes
  • Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for "Taggot, the Blacksmith's Daughter"

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Themes of Adversity: "Thomas, the Doctor's Son" (7 minutes)

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (3 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Reading for Flow and Gist: "Taggot, the Blacksmith's Daughter" (20 minutes)

B. Identifying Themes of Adversity: "Taggot, the Blacksmith's Daughter" (10 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Adversity Today--Question and Discussion (5 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Read "Mogg, the Villein's Daughter" and complete the Themes of Adversity graphic organizer.

  • Students begin this lesson in triads discussing their homework from "Thomas, the Doctor's Son." Support students as they identify themes of adversity in the monologue and consider whether these themes exist today.
  • In this lesson, students read closely  "Taggot, the Blacksmith's Daughter," reading the monologue four times, each for a different purpose. The lesson follows a similar routine to Lesson 2, when students completed the close read of "Hugo, the Lord's Nephew."
  • The first read invites students to listen with their eyes closed, as the monologue is read aloud to them. Then students follow along in the text as it is read to them a second time. After the second read, students partner-read, being mindful of punctuation and expression. Finally, students read independently and use sticky notes to annotate the text for gist.
  • After reading closely, students work with a partner to identify the themes of adversity in the monologue. Partners then consider whether these themes of adversity in the monologue exist today.
  • Consider collecting students' graphic organizers to read through the themes of adversity they face today. This will provide guidance for discussion in Lesson 5.
  • In advance:

-    Form student partnerships for identifying themes of adversity.

  • Post: Learning targets. 

Vocabulary

monologue, theme, adversity, stanza; Maying, May Day, palfrey

Materials

  • Document camera
  • Themes of Adversity anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2)
  • Good Masters! Sweet Ladies! (book; one per student)
  • Sticky notes (10 per student)
  • Equity sticks
  • Academic Word Wall anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2; see Lesson 2 supporting material for teacher reference)
  • Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for "Taggot, the Blacksmith's Daughter" (one per student)
  • Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for "Mogg, the Villein's Daughter" (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Themes of Adversity: "Thomas, the Doctor's Son" (7 minutes)

  • As students enter the classroom, invite them to sit in their triads. Remind them that for homework they were to read "Thomas, the Doctor's Son" and fill out their Themes of Adversity graphic organizer. Ask students to share with their triad one theme of adversity Thomas faced, the page number of the text-based evidence, and the group of people affected by the adversity.
  • During discussion, circulate and support triads to ensure that all students are participating and have completed the graphic organizer. If students need support, ask probing questions, such as:

* "What challenges does Thomas face as he trains to become a doctor?"

* "What does he need to be mindful of as he builds his practice?"

  • Invite volunteers to share themes of adversity, or challenges, that Thomas confronts in his medical profession.
  • Listen for: "Thomas learns to manipulate his patients and their families," "Thomas says and does things to make himself look good in front of his patients," and "Thomas did not have cures for illness and disease because antibiotics did not exist."
  • Add these themes to the Themes of Adversity anchor chart.

-    One piece of evidence that supports manipulation is found on page 19: "That trencher full of venison I see/Is much too rich! Just hand it back to me!" The group affected by Thomas's adversity is all groups of people under his care and other healthcare providers. The healthcare providers need to be valued by the people in order to get paid.

  • Invite volunteers to share their responses from the third column of the Themes of Adversity graphic organizer:

* "Do the adversities from 'Thomas, the Doctor's Son' exist today?"

  • Listen for students to say these themes do exist today. Manipulation, or twisting the truth for one's own purposes, can happen in all areas of life with adults and children. Doctors today also want to be respected and valued by their patients. They continue to face challenges finding cures for diseases and illness, although advances in medicine, such as the discovery of antibiotics, have improved modern medicine.
  • Ask students to read the endnotes with you in the Notes section on page 84. The four definitions provide additional background information on diseases, illnesses, and medical beliefs during this era.
  • After reading the endnotes, explain that Middle Ages medicine was extremely basic during a time when terrible illnesses such as the Black Death were killing nearly one-third of the population. Medicine was limited. Physicians had no idea what caused the illnesses and diseases. The Catholic Church believed that illnesses were a punishment from God for sinful behavior. Because there were no antibiotics during this time, it was almost impossible to cure illness and disease. Medicines were typically made from herbs and spices and put in drinks, pills, washes, baths, rubs, and ointments.
  • Reviewing the homework holds all students accountable for reading the monologues and completing their homework.

B. Unpacking Leaning Targets (3 minutes)

  • Invite students to read the first learning target aloud with you:

* "I can read the monologue 'Taggot, the Blacksmith's Daughter' for flow and for gist."

  • Tell students they will read this monologue about Taggot four times, each with a different focus. Remind them that they completed these four reads with a different monologue in a previous lesson. 
  • Invite students to read the second learning target aloud with you:

* "I can determine the themes of the monologue 'Taggot, the Blacksmith's Daughter.'"

  • Tell students they have been identifying themes of adversity in Lessons 2 and 3. Ask triads:

* "Who remembers the meaning of theme from our discussions?"

  • Give them time to discuss, then cold call students. Listen for and guide them to recall that a theme is the author's message about a topic.
  • Remind students that the author reveals theme through important details or events, through dialogue of the main characters, and/or through the main character's actions.
  • Discussing and clarifying the language of learning targets helps build academic vocabulary.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reading for Flow and Gist: "Taggot, the Blacksmith's Daughter" (20 minutes)

  • Tell students that they will now complete the four readings of "Taggot, the Blacksmith's Daughter"in Good Masters! Sweet Ladies!  

-    First read: Listen with eyes closed as the teacher reads aloud.

-    Second read: Open to page 5 and follow along as the teacher reads aloud.

-    Third read: Read with a partner, taking turns reading aloud to each other.

-    Fourth read: Independently read the monologue. Pause at least twice per page. Use sticky notes to annotate or make note of what is happening in that part of the monologue.

  • Invite students to close their eyes and listen as you read the monologue aloud.
  • Ask students to turn to page 5, "Taggot, the Blacksmith's Daughter." Remind them that some words and phrases have numbers after them in the monologue and that definitions can be found in the back of the book in the Notes section. Direct students to page 83 and read aloud the explanations for the numbered terms. Also, explain the word palfrey. It is referred to as a saddle horse, not a horse used in war.
  • Redirect students to page 5 of the monologue. Invite them to follow along as you read aloud.
  • Form student partnerships and tell students to read the monologue aloud to each other. Remind them to be aware that punctuation contributes to their understanding of text. As students read, circulate and listen for fluency.
  • Prepare students for their final independent reading. Distribute 10 sticky notes to each student. Tell them to pause at least twice per page to make note of what is happening in the monologue. Explain that breaking the passage into smaller sections, or chunking the text, is helpful with understanding the gist, or the main idea of the monologue.
  • Remind students that everyone may not finish at the same time. Ask them to respect the quiet reading environment as classmates finish. Encourage students to reread, review their notes, and refer to the "Notes" section beginning on page 83 to read the explanations of other endnotes in other monologues.
  • Circulate as students read independently. To support them, ask them to read several lines of a stanza and to tell you what it is about. Also, guide students' comprehension by asking probing questions such as:

* "What is Taggot doing in this stanza?"

  • Refocus students whole class. Congratulate them for following the steps of a close read. Explain that the work they have just completed will help with identifying the themes of adversity in the monologue.
  • Make note of students who may benefit from reading for gist in supported small groups.

B. Identifying Themes of Adversity: "Taggot, the Blacksmith's Daughter" (10 minutes)

  • Remind students that in Lesson 1 they were introduced to themes of adversity, and in Lessons 2 and 3 they identified themes of adversity in "Hugo, the Lord's Nephew."
  • Use equity sticks to select a student to read the definition adversity on the Academic Word Wall.
  • Distribute the Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for "Taggot, the Blacksmith's Daughter" to each student.
  • Ask them to Think-Pair-Share:

* "What adversity or adversities did Taggot face in the monologue?"

  • Listen for responses such as: "Taggot feels inadequate as a woman" and "Taggot has a crush on someone who doesn't feel the same way."
  • Discuss and record the themes of adversity in the first column of the Themes of Adversity anchor chart. Select one theme to model using the anchor chart.
  • Tell students to complete their Themes of Adversity graphic organizer as you complete the anchor chart. Ask them to record the theme of adversity. For example: "Taggot is feeling inadequate as a woman who might never marry."
  • Invite partners to find evidence in the text that identifies this adversity. Ask them to include the page number where they found their evidence. For example, on page 6 Taggot says, "I think I'm ugly. Big and ugly and shy."
  • Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

* "What group of people share Taggot's feelings of inadequacy when it comes to their position as a woman?"

  • Listen for: "unmarried women in medieval times." Another group she belongs to is the craftspeople. Model writing this response. Discuss what Taggot's life might be like if she doesn't marry.
  • Ask partners to complete Columns 2 and 3 of their graphic organizer for the other themes.
  • Invite volunteers to share the evidence of Taggot's having a crush on someone who does not feel the same way.
  • Listen for: "On page 9 the author writes, 'I went outside, back to the forge. He was gone by then, long gone, and it seems a long life.'"
  • Invite volunteers to share the group of people affected by this adversity. 
  • Listen for: "Taggot and other unmarried women." Taggot's family would also be affected. Have a discussion about what Taggot's life might be like if she does not marry.
  • Add the themes of adversity in "Taggot, the Blacksmith's Daughter" to the Themes of Adversity anchor chart.
  • Explain that the work students have just done is the same as their homework.
  • Consider allowing select students to complete one adversity with a partner or in a supported small group. 

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Adversity Today--Question and Discussion (5 minutes)

  • Ask students to turn and talk:

* "Do the themes of adversity you identified in 'Taggot, the Blacksmith's Daughter' exist today?"

  • Ask students to write examples or evidence from their own experiences on the graphic organizer.
  • Circulate as students are writing their responses. Guide with probing questions. Make note of students who understand the theme of adversity and are citing evidence or examples and those who may benefit from additional support.
  • Distribute a Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for "Mogg, the Villein's Daughter."
  • Asking students to consider whether Taggot's themes of adversity exist today will engage them and make it relevant to their lives. 

Homework

Homework
  • Read "Mogg, the Villein's Daughter" and complete the Themes of Adversity graphic organizer.

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