Close Read, Part 2: “Hugo, the Lord’s Nephew” | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M2B:U2:L3

Close Read, Part 2: “Hugo, the Lord’s Nephew”

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can determine the meaning of literal and figurative language (metaphors and similes) in literary text. (RL.6.4)
  • I can analyze how an author's word choice affects tone and meaning in a literary text. (RL.6.4)
  • I can analyze how a particular sentence, stanza, scene, or chapter fits in and contributes to the development of a literary text. (RL.6.5)
  • I can analyze figurative language word relationships and nuances in word meanings. (L.6.5)
  • I can interpret figures of speech in context. (L.6.5a)
  • I can use the relationship between particular words to better understand each of the words. (L.6.5b)
  • I can distinguish among the connotations (associations) of words with similar denotations (definitions). (L.6.5c)

Supporting Targets

  • I can determine the meaning of figurative language in the monologue "Hugo, the Lord's Nephew."
  • I can analyze how the author's word choice affects the tone of the monologue "Hugo, the Lord's Nephew."
  • I can analyze how a single stanza (or sentence) adds to the whole monologue. 

Ongoing Assessment

  • Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for "Giles, the Beggar" (from homework)
  • Figurative Language graphic organizer for "Hugo, the Lord's Nephew"
  • Close Reading Guide: "Hugo, the Lord's Nephew"
  • Exit Ticket: Give One, Get One--Word Choice

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes


1. Opening

A. Themes of Adversity and Figurative Language: "Giles, the Beggar" (7 minutes)

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (3 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Introducing Figurative Language: "Hugo, the Lord's Nephew" (10 minutes)

B. Word Choice and Tone: "Hugo, the Lord's Nephew" (20 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Changing Figurative to Literal Language (5 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Read "Thomas, the Doctor" and complete the Themes of Adversity graphic organizer. 

 

  • Students were introduced to monologues and themes of adversity in Lessons 1 and 2. In Lesson 2, they read the monologue "Hugo, the Lord's Nephew" in Good Masters! Sweet Ladies! for flow and gist and to identify the themes of adversity. In this lesson, students begin looking at figurative language and how it is used to help the reader imagine and feel the adversities or challenges that Hugo faced.
  • In this lesson, students compare figurative and literal language to examine how an author's use of different figures of speech helps convey messages or express themes in interesting and dramatic ways. They also examine how the author's word choice affects tone or the expression of feelings or attitudes.
  • Continue to reinforce the routine of the Themes of Adversity graphic organizer. Students work with this graphic organizer in the opening (regarding "Giles, the Beggar!), during Work Time (regarding "Hugo, the Lord's Nephew") and again for homework (regarding "Thomas, the Doctor"). Consider what supports students need to use this graphic organizer well: it is a crucial scaffold both for them analyzing the text and gathering evidence for their writing later in the unit.
  • In advance:

-    Add these words and definitions to the Academic Word Wall: figurative languageliteral languageword choicetone.

  • Post: Learning targets, Themes of Adversity anchor chart.

Vocabulary

figurative language, figures of speech, literal language, tone, metaphor, simile, personification, idiom

Materials

  • Good Masters! Sweet Ladies! (book; one per student)
  • Document camera
  • Themes of Adversity anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2)
  • Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for "Giles, the Beggar" (from Lesson 2; one blank to display)
  • Figurative and Literal Language reference sheet (one per student and one to display)
  • Figurative Language graphic organizer (one per student and one to display)
  • Text Dependent Questions: "Hugo, the Lord's Nephew (one per student, and one to display)
  • Close Reading Guide: "Hugo, the Lord's Nephew" (for teacher reference)
  • Exit Ticket: Give One, Get One--Word Choice (one per student)
  • Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for "Thomas, the Doctor" (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Themes of Adversity and Figurative Language: "Giles, the Beggar"(7 minutes)

  • Ask students to gather their book, Good Masters! Sweet Ladies!, and Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for "Giles, the Beggar" (from homework) and join their triads.
  • Use a document camera to display the Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for "Giles, the Beggar."
  • Ask students to share with their triad at least one theme of adversity that Giles faced in the monologue. Tell them to include the group of people during medieval times who they think were affected by this adversity (for example: women, children, serfs, clergy, etc.). Encourage students to share evidence that supports that adversity and the page number where that evidence was found.
  • Circulate as students discuss. Provide support and guide students with probing questions such as these:

* "What evidence did you use from the text to help you determine that theme of adversity?"

* "What evidence from your experience makes you believe this is still a theme of adversity today?"

  • Call on triads to share adversities they identified with the whole class.
  • As students share, use a document camera to model responses that direct them toward specific adversities presented in the monologue. For example: An adversity that Giles faced was a fight for survival and hunger. Evidence that illustrates that adversity or challenge includes when Giles enters a town and cries out, "Food for the famished! Alms for the poor!" He staggers and collapses in the dust. His father tells the people he has healing "holy water" used "on the feet of Saint James, Apostle!" Giles is anointed, and he throws down his crutch and walks. "My father and I rehearsed this for hours--miracles have to look perfectly natural." Later, the two meet outside of town, and Giles is paid. His father gives him bread, an apple, cabbage, or turnips, or if it is a good day, sausages.  
  • Ask students to consider both the theme of adversity and the evidence as they identify the people affected by this challenge. Listen for responses that include Giles and his father. Responses should also include peasants or serfs, the societal group that Giles and his father belong to.
  • As a class, select themes of adversity to add to the Themes of Adversity anchor chart.
  • Ask students if they think the adversities or challenges in "Giles, the Beggar" exist today. Invite them to share their thoughts and examples that support their thinking. 
  • Providing routines for students to share their findings in their independent homework reading allows them to self-start when they begin class.
  • Collaborative discussion of the homework at the beginning of the lesson holds students accountable for doing their homework. It also provides the opportunity to assess who is or isn't reading the monologues at home.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (3 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the learning targets and read them aloud:

* "I can determine the meaning of figurative language in the monologue 'Hugo, the Lord's Nephew.'"

* "I can analyze how the author's word choice affects the tone of the monologue 'Hugo, the Lord's Nephew.'"

* "I can analyze how a single stanza (or sentence) adds to the whole monologue."

  • Ask:

* "What is figurative language?"

  • Cold call students to share their thinking. If students are not familiar with figurative language, explain that it is language that uses words to create images of what something looks, sounds, or feels like. These word creations, or figures of speech, are like an artist's selection of colors, a musician's choice of sound, or an actor's choice of costume and voice to convey or communicate the message they want readers to understand. Learning how to recognize and use figurative language will provide an opportunity to share stories in a way that people can experience or imagine.
  • Ask students to notice the terms word choice and tone in the second target. Underline, highlight, or circle those words in the posted target. Explain that in today's lesson, they will analyze, or examine, particular words that Laura Amy Schlitz, the author of Good Masters! Sweet Ladies!, chose to help readers feel and experience the challenges that Hugo faced in the monologue. That selection of particular words creates the tone and mood of the story.
  • Direct students' attention to the words "stanza (or sentence)" in the third learning target. Explain that some of the monologues they read, including "Hugo, the Lord's Nephew" are divided into parts called stanzas. Like pieces of a puzzle, each stanza or sentence contributes to the creation of the whole monologue. 
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding.
  • Discussing and clarifying the language of learning targets helps build academic vocabulary.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Introducing Figurative Language: "Hugo, the Lord's Nephew" (10 minutes)

  • Remind students that in Lesson 2, they read "Hugo, the Lord's Nephew" for flow and to identify the gist and themes of adversity. In this lesson, they will look more closely at the monologue for how the story is told.
  • Remind students that the person who tells a story is called the narrator. In Good Masters! Sweet Ladies!, the main characters tell stories from their own perspectives, with their own voices. The narrators, or main characters, are all young people between the ages of 10 and 15. Through the language they use, they create emotion, drama, and vivid images for readers to grasp the challenges they faced during a time in their life in a medieval village. Tell students that some of the language they use is called figurative language.
  • Distribute and display the Figurative and Literal Language reference sheet.
  • Explain that this reference sheet is meant to help students as they learn about figurative and literal language.
  • Ask students to look at the bold-faced term, figurative language. Explain that figurative language is words or expressions used to create an image or special effect. This type of language is different from literal language, where words are used in ways that match their definition.
  • Provide an example by using a figure of speech such as:

* "When I asked the class a question, I thought the cat got their tongues."

  • Ask students what that statement means. Listen for: "When you asked the class a question, no one answered."
  • Tell students the example you used is a type of figurative language, and their response is literal language.
  • Ask students to look at the headings of each column on the reference sheet. Point out that:

-    The first column lists different types of figurative language called figures of speech.

-    The second column defines the different types of figurative language and gives examples of each.

-    The third column translates the example into literal language.

  • Tell students that first the four figures of speech--similemetaphorpersonification, and idiom--are types of figurative language used in "Hugo, the Lord's Nephew."
  • Form student partnerships.
  • Distribute and display the Figurative Language graphic organizer.  
  • Explain that the first column has three quotes from "Hugo" that are types of figurative language. Ask students to work with their partners to identify what type of figurative language is used. Encourage them to use their Figurative and Literal Language reference sheets. Tell them to write what the quote means in literal language in the second column. In the third column, they should explain how it adds to the understanding of the scene or the character.
  • Circulate and support students as they identify the figures of speech and determine literal meanings of the quotes.

B. Word Choice and Tone: "Hugo, the Lord's Nephew" (20 minutes)

  • Invite students to sit in their triads.
  • Tell them that figurative language is one way in which authors affect the tone of a monologue. Another way is through word choice.
  • Ask students to recall the challenges or adversities Hugo faced. Listen for: "fear of being punished," "fear of hunting the boar," "facing the challenge of proving he can act like a man."
  • Guide students toward the idea that as Hugo shares his story, he is able to convey or communicate his feelings about these challenges through the words he uses.
  • Explain that those word choices create the story's tone. Ask:

* "Where have you heard the word tone?"

  • Students have probably encountered this word in music or in the phrase "tone of voice." Explain that the use of the word tone when discussing literature is more like "tone of voice" because, as with our voices, tone in writing conveys feeling. In the absence of an actual voice, authors use words to create a tone and convey feeling or attitude.
  • Define tone as the feelings or attitude the narrator has about the theme of the monologue.
  • Ask students what the themes of the monologues in Good Masters! Sweet Ladies! are about. Listen for responses that include challenge or adversity.
  • Tell students they will look at excerpts from "Hugo, the Lord's Nephew" to determine the words the author chose to create the feeling or attitude presented in the monologue.
  • Distribute and display the Text-Dependent Questions: "Hugo, the Lord's Nephew."
  • Refer to the Close Reading Guide: "Hugo, the Lord's Nephew" (for teacher reference) to guide the discussion.
  • Congratulate students on their ability to analyze word choice during the close read. Encourage them to tune in to Laura Amy Schlitz's word choice when they read "Thomas, the Doctor's Son" for homework.
  • When reviewing graphic organizers or recording forms, consider using a document camera to display them for students who struggle with auditory processing.
  • Providing models of expected work supports all learners, but especially those who are challenged.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Exit Ticket:Give One, Get One--Word Choice (5 minutes)

  • Distribute Exit Ticket: Give One, Get One--Word Choice.
  • Remind students that one of the themes of adversity in "Hugo, the Lord's Nephew" was fear.That theme of fear is creatively brought to life by the words the author chose. Invite students to skim the monologue, locate at least two words or phrases that convey or suggest fear, and write these on their exit ticket.
  • Invite students to quietly mingle with classmates to share what they found. When they link up with another student who has a different example than the ones they chose and they have an example to give the other student, they each add the new example to their exit tickets.
  • Students continue to mingle until they have completed their exit tickets with word choices that help convey the theme of fear.
  • Tell students to look at the quotes from "Hugo, the Lord's Nephew" in the first column. Explain that these quotes are examples of figurative language used in the monologue.
  • Ask students to use literal language to write what the quote is saying in the second column.
  • Ask students to identify what type of figurative language is used. Encourage them to use their Figurative and Literal Language reference sheets.
  • Collect the exit tickets.  Use them as a formative assessment of students' ability to analyze an author's word choice.
  • Distribute the Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for "Thomas, the Doctor." Remind students of the value of this homework for having rich and engaging discussions with their opening triads.

Homework

Homework
  • Read "Thomas, the Doctor" and complete the Themes of Adversity graphic organizer. 

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