End of Unit 2 Assessment: Final Draft of Literary Argument Essay | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M2B:U2:L16

End of Unit 2 Assessment: Final Draft of Literary Argument Essay

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can use correct grammar and usage when writing or speaking. (L.6.1)
  • I can use correct capitalization, punctuation, and spelling to send a clear message to my reader. (L.6.2)
  • With support from peers and adults, I can use the writing process to ensure that purpose and audience have been addressed. (W.6.5)

Supporting Targets

  • I can use the Literary Argument Essay rubric to provide kind, specific, and helpful feedback to my peers.
  • I can use teacher feedback to revise my argument essay to further meet the expectations of the Literary Argument Essay rubric. 

Ongoing Assessment

  • Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for "Drogo, the Tanner's Apprentice" (from homework)
  • End of Unit 2 Assessment: Final draft of literary argument essay 

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Reader: "Drogo, the Tanner's Apprentice" (7 minutes)

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Mini Lesson: Addressing Common Errors (8 minutes)

B. Peer Critique: Draft Literary Arguments (10 minutes)

C. Essay Revision (16 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Collecting End of Unit Assessments (2 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Finish the final draft of your essay to turn in tomorrow, along with first draft, rubric, and planners.

  • This lesson is an opportunity for students to review and revise their essays to meet the expectations of the Literary Argument Essay Rubric.
  • In advance, be sure to have reviewed students' first drafts (from Lesson 13) against Rows 1 and 3 of the rubric. Give specific positive feedback for at least one thing each student did well. Provide at least one specific area of focus for each student for revision.
  • This lesson includes 8 minutes to address common mistakes you noticed while reviewing student essays. A sample structure is provided here. Focus the lesson on one specific, common convention error you noticed as you assessed the drafts.
  • Some students may need more help with revising than others. There is space for this during the revision time.
  • Some students may not finish their final draft during this lesson. Consider whether to allow them to finish their essays at home and hand them in at the beginning of the next lesson.
  • Post: Learning targets and peer critique guidelines (see supporting materials).

Vocabulary

peer critique; hide, alum, tallow, forge

Materials

  • Writing Word Wall (from Lesson 10)
  • Are We Medieval? A Literary Argument Essay Prompt (from Lesson 9; one per student)
  • Students' draft argument essays (from Lesson 13; returned in this lesson with teacher feedback)
  • Self-Assessment: Rows 1 and 3 of Literary Argument Essay Rubric (from Lesson 13; one per student)
  • Peer critique guidelines (one to display)
  • Literary Argument Essay Rubric (from Lesson 10; one per student)
  • Stars and Steps recording form (one per student)
  • Computers or lined paper 

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: "Drogo, the Tanner's Apprentice" (7 minutes)

  • Ask students to take out their Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for "Drogo, the Tanner's Apprentice" and share their responses with a partner; they should make revisions to their graphic organizer as necessary.
  • Select volunteers to share how they filled out their graphic organizer. Listen for them to explain that:

-    The theme of adversity in the monologue is people complaining about how the nature of his work causes problems for them.

-    The text evidence they may cite for this is: "I do mind the sneering of Nelly the sniggler--her tongue could scrape the hair off a hide! And I mind the townsmen nattering on, saying we foul the waters."

-    The group of people affected is tanners and their apprentices.

  • Ask students to discuss with their partner:

* "Is this an adversity we face today?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that people do still complain to other people when the nature of their work causes problems for them.
  • Ask:

* "Is there any domain-specific vocabulary we could add to the Word Wall from this monologue?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses. Record suggestions on the Writing Word Wall. Words should include: hidealumtallow, and forge. You may need to tell students what some of the unfamiliar words mean.
  • Opening the lesson by asking students to share their homework makes them accountable for completing it. It also gives you the opportunity to monitor which students are not doing their homework.
  • Consider pairing ELLs who speak the same first language to deepen their discussion and understanding.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Display the End of Unit 2 Assessment Prompt: Are We Medieval? A Literary Argument Essay Prompt.
  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and read them aloud:

* "I can use the Literary Argument Essay Rubric to provide kind, specific, and helpful feedback to my peers."

* "I can use teacher feedback to revise my argument essay to further meet the expectations of the Literary Argument Essay Rubric."

  • Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

* "Given what you have been learning from looking at the model essay and the rubric, and from planning your own essay, what do you want to focus on as you revise?"

  • Emphasize that writing well is hard, and revision is important to make one's message as clear as possible for readers. Encourage students and thank them in advance for showing persistence and stamina. Revising is difficult, but it is one of the things that can help make a good essay great. 
  • The review of learning targets is yet another identifier of what is expected on the student essays.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Mini Lesson: Addressing Common Errors (8 minutes)

  • Tell students that you noticed a common error in their essays (for instance, comma splices or inconsistent capitalization).
  • Display an example of the error. Explain why it is incorrect.
  • Model how to revise and correct the error.
  • Check for understanding. Ask students to give you a thumbs-up if they understand the error and how to fix it when revising, or a thumbs-down if they don't understand fully.
  • If many students give a thumbs-down, show another example of the error. Ask them to think about how to fix it.
  • Cold call a student to suggest how to correct it. If the answer is incorrect, clarify. Again, ask students to give you a thumbs-up or thumbs-down. If some are still struggling, consider checking in with them individually.
  • Tell students that they will get their essays back now with specific feedback. Ask them to look over the comments and make sure they understand them. Invite students to raise their hands to ask questions if they have them. Alternatively, create a "Help List" on the board and invite students to add their names to it if they need questions answered.
  • Return students' draft argument essays with your feedback and their Self-Assessments: Rows 1 and 3 of Literary Argument Essay Rubric from Lesson 13.

B. Peer Critique: Draft Literary Arguments (10 minutes)

  • Remind students that a peer critique is when we look over someone else's work and provide them with feedback. Explain that peer critiquing must be done carefully because we want to be helpful to our peers so they can use our suggestions to improve their work. We don't want to make them feel bad. Post the peer critique guidelines:
  1. Be kind: Always treat others with dignity and respect. This means we never use words that are hurtful, including sarcasm.
  2. Be specific: Focus on particular strengths and weaknesses, rather than making general comments like "It's good" or "I like it." Provide insight into why it is good or what, specifically, you like about it.
  3. Be helpful: The goal is to positively contribute to the individual or the group, not to simply be heard. Echoing the thoughts of others or cleverly pointing out details that are irrelevant wastes time.
  4. Participate: Peer critique is a process to support each other, and your feedback is valued!
  • Display the Literary Argument Essay Rubric and ask students to refer to their own copies.
  • Focus students on the second row, Command of Evidence. In Column 3, highlight/underline this section: "Develops the claim with relevant facts, definitions, details, quotations, or other information and examples from the text(s)."
  • Invite students to read each part of this section of the rubric aloud with you. Tell them that during the peer critique time, they will focus on this specific element of someone else's argument essay.
  • Emphasize that their job is to make sure that their peers' use of evidence and organization is strong. Distinguish peer critique from proofreading. It is fine if they catch grammatical errors in each other's work, but the goal is to make the thinking in the writing as strong as possible.
  • Tell students that they will present feedback in the form of stars and steps. Remind them that they have done this in the first module. Today, they will give one "star" and one "step" based on Row 2 of the rubric.
  • Briefly model how to give "kind, specific, helpful" stars. Be sure to connect your comments directly to each row of the rubric. For example:

* "You have used three details from the novel to support your claims."

  • Repeat, briefly modeling how to give "kind, specific, helpful" steps. For example:

* "Can you find a detail from the text to support that claim?"

  • Emphasize that it is especially important to be kind when giving steps. Asking a question of the writer is often a good way to do this. "I wonder if ...?" or "Have you thought about ...?"
  • Distribute the Stars and Steps recording form. Explain that today, students will record the star and step for their partner on this sheet so that their partner can remember the feedback he or she receives. They are to write the name of their partner at the top of their paper.
  • Pair up students. Invite pairs to swap essays and to spend 3 minutes reading them in silence.
  • Ask students to record a star and step for their partner on the recording form.
  • Circulate to assist students who may struggle with recording their feedback.
  • Ask students to return the essay and Stars and Steps recording form to their partner and to explain the star and step they recorded for their partner. Invite students to question their partner if they don't understand the star and step they have been given.
  • The use of leading questions on student essays helps struggling students understand what areas they should improve on before submitting their essay again.
  • Set up peer critiquing carefully to ensure that students feel safe giving and receiving feedback. Students must be given a set of clear guidelines for behavior, and they need to see the teacher model how to do it successfully. Asking students to provide feedback to their peers based on explicit criteria benefits both students in clarifying what a strong piece of writing should look like. Students can learn from both the strengths and weaknesses that they notice in the work of peers.

C. Essay Revision (16 minutes)

  • Invite students to apply their self-assessment from the end of Lesson 13, the mini lesson, the stars and steps from the peer critique, and the feedback given on their draft to revise their essay.
  • If using computers to draft, students can review and revise. If handwriting, students will need lined paper to write a best copy of their essay, incorporating the feedback and learning from the mini lesson.
  • Circulate around the room, addressing questions. Consider checking in first with students who need extra support to make sure they can use their time well.
  • When a few minutes are left, if students are working on computers, ask them to save their work.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Collecting End of Unit Assessments (2 minutes)

  • Give students specific positive praise for perseverance you observed. Collect the final drafts from those students who feel that they have finished (plus all of their organizers and planners).
  • Based on whether you want this to be a timed assessment, consider giving students who still want more time the option of finishing their essay for homework.

Homework

Homework
  • Finish the final draft of your essay to turn in tomorrow, along with first draft, rubric, and planners.

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