Writing: Drafting Body Paragraphs and Revising for Language | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M2B:U2:L12

Writing: Drafting Body Paragraphs and Revising for Language

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite text-based evidence to support an analysis of literary text. (RL.6.1)
  • I can determine a theme based on details in a literary text. (RL.6.2)
  • I can write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. (W.6.1)
  • I can produce clear and coherent writing that is appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (W.6.4)
  • With support from peers and adults, I can use a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing. (W.6.5)
  • I can accurately use sixth-grade academic vocabulary to express my ideas. (L.6.6)

Supporting Targets

  • I can draft the body paragraphs of my literary argument essay.
  • I can use precise and domain-specific language to formally argue my claim.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for "Isobel, the Lord's Daughter" (from homework)
  • Draft of body paragraphs

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Reader: "Isobel, the Lord's Daughter" (7 minutes)

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (3 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Reviewing Formal Style (4 minutes)

B. Independent Writing: Drafting Body Paragraphs of the Literary Argument Essay (23 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Revising Word Choice (8 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Read "Nelly, the Sniggler" and complete the Themes of Adversity graphic organizer.

  • This lesson asks students to draft their two body paragraphs using the following for guidance: the model essay; Are We Medieval?: Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer; and the instruction provided in Lessons 10 and 11. Students will complete their introduction and conclusion in subsequent lessons.
  • Remind students of your expectations for quiet work time during their drafting. They will benefit from the focused work time, and you will benefit from seeing which students are still struggling with getting their ideas organized.
  • Students review the criteria on both the Formal Style anchor chart from Unit 1 and Qualities of a Strong Literacy Essay anchor chart from Lesson 9 before drafting. This step is meant to remind them of these important qualities and also ways to maintain a formal writing style.
  • In the Closing, students refer to both the Academic Word Wall and the Writing Word Wall and revise their body paragraphs to include as much academic vocabulary and domain-specific vocabulary as is relevant to the content of their body paragraphs. Be aware that students may try to force-fit words just to fulfill the criteria, so encourage them to use domain-specific vocabulary from the word wall only where it is appropriate.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

precise, domain-specific; gown, dung, modest maid, Lammas Day, maidservant

Materials

  • Writing Word Wall (from Lesson 10)
  • Literary Argument Essay Rubric (from Lesson 10; one per student)
  • Formal Style anchor chart (from Unit 1, Lesson 11)
  • Qualities of a Strong Literary Essay anchor chart (from Lesson 9)
  • Are We Medieval?: Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer (from Lesson 10; one per student)
  • Model Essay: "Are We Medieval?: Opportunities in the Middle Ages and Today" (from Lesson 9; one per student)
  • Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for "Nelly, the Sniggler"

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: "Isobel, the Lord's Daughter" (7 minutes)

  • Ask students to take out their Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for "Isobel, the Lord's Daughter" and share their responses with a partner; they should make revisions to their graphic organizer as necessary.
  • Select volunteers to share out. Listen for:

-    The theme of adversity in the monologue is being bullied by others because of being different. Isobel has nicer things than many of the other children in the town, so they are mean to her.

-    The text evidence they may cite for this is: "I passed through the town on the way to the market and somebody threw it--a clod of dung," "They hate me. Why? What have I done?" and "I want to forget the way they laughed--their smiles were so ugly I almost feared. They were big boys, almost men, and I was alone."

-    The person affected is Isobel, the lord's daughter.

  • Ask students to discuss with their partner:

* "Is this an adversity we face today?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that bullying because someone is different, or has more or less than someone else, is still an issue today.
  • Ask:

* "Is there any domain-specific vocabulary we could add to the Writing Word Wall from this monologue?"

  • Record student suggestions on the Writing Word Wall. Words should include: gowndungmodest maidLammas Day, and maidservant. You may need to tell students what some of the unfamiliar words mean.
  • Opening the lesson by asking students to share their homework makes them accountable for completing it. It also gives you the opportunity to monitor which students are not doing their homework.
  • Consider pairing ELLs who speak the same first language in order to deepen their discussion and understanding.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (3 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and read them aloud:

* "I can draft the body paragraphs of my literary argument essay."

* "I can use precise and domain-specific language to formally argue my claim."

  • Ask students to take out their Literary Argument Essay Rubric and read Row 3 and Column 3 to themselves.
  • Ask:

* "What does precise mean?"

  • Listen for: "Precise means to be exact and accurate."
  • Share an example with students:

* "For example, the precise word for how I feel is 'furious,' not just mad. 'Furious' shows the precise degree to which I feel mad."

  • Ask:

* "What might domain-specific language mean? Let me give you an example in context. To work as a biologist, you have to learn a lot of domain-specific words about biology. So, what do you think domain-specific language means?"

  • Listen for: "It means words used for a specific study or work."
  • Remind students that domain-specific vocabulary in this unit is about life in the Middle Ages.
  • Encourage them to refer to the Writing Word Wall to help them use all the "impressive" vocabulary they have been learning along the way.  
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reviewing Formal Style (4 minutes)

  • Remind students that as they write an essay, they need to maintain a formal style throughout. Refer them to the Formal Style anchor chart from Unit 1 and invite them to reread the criteria for making an essay more formal.
  • Tell students that you want them to refer to the criteria on the anchor chart as they write their body paragraphs to ensure they maintain a formal style throughout their writing.
  • Referring to anchor charts created in previous modules and units can reinforce to students that the criteria they generate can be applied to lots of different kinds of writing.

B. Independent Writing: Drafting Body Paragraphs of the Literary Argument Essay (23 minutes)

  • Remind students of the Qualities of a Strong Literary Essay anchor chart and invite them to reread the criteria listed on it. Encourage them to consider these criteria when writing their body paragraphs in this lesson.
  • Direct students to retrieve their Are We Medieval?: Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer from Lessons 10 and 11, as they will use this as well as the model essay and the Literary Argument Essay Rubric to guide their paragraph writing.
  • Remind them that there are expectations for quiet writing time. Explain that talking is a great way to learn and share ideas; however, quiet, focused writing is also a great way to learn. They have had several lessons to talk about the adversities faced by people in the Middle Ages and whether we struggle with any of those adversities today; now the focus is on working independently to draft a quality literary argument essay.
  • Explain that students will write the introduction and conclusion in Lesson 13. Their goal today is to write the two body paragraphs in a logical way.
  • Display the Model Essay: "Are We Medieval?: Opportunities in the Middle Ages and Today."
  • Ask students to read silently in their heads as you read the two body paragraphs aloud. Remind them that they should be aiming to organize the adversities, text evidence, examples from life today, and their explanations in a similar way to the model.
  • Ask:

* "How are you feeling, Fist to Five, about your readiness to start writing on your own today? A five means you are ready and eager, a three means you might need help getting started, and a one means please confer with me first."

  • Make a note of students who have a one, two, or three. Circulate to those students first. Then, continue conferring with students during this work time. Focus on how students are meeting the learning target "I can draft the body paragraphs of my literary argument essay." Consider postponing feedback related to conventions and grammar. These writing skills will be instructed when students revise their early draft for a final draft in later lessons.
  • Give students time to draft their body paragraphs.
  • Consider grouping students who may need additional support in recording their ideas in one area of the room so that you can spend time working with them.
  • Consider inviting students who may struggle to record their ideas in body paragraphs to say their ideas to you aloud before writing them down.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Revising Word Choice (8 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention back to the posted learning targets and review the second one: "I can use precise and domain-specific language to formally argue my claim."
  • Ask:

* "What does precise language mean again?"

* "What does domain-specific language mean?"

  • Invite volunteers to answer each question. Listen for them to say that to be precise means to be exact and accurate. Domain-specific language means language used for a specific study or work, like the novel and writing techniques.
  • Invite students to work in pairs to review the body paragraphs they have written and to revise them to use domain-specific vocabulary from the Writing Word Wall and academic vocabulary from the Academic Word Wall where appropriate. Make it clear that students are not to "force it"; they are to include academic and domain-specific vocabulary only where it is appropriate.
  • Distribute a Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for "Nelly, the Sniggler."
  • The use of domain-specific vocabulary may be challenging for ELLs. Consider pairing these students with students for whom English is their first language to support them in the revision process.

Homework

Homework
  • Read "Nelly, the Sniggler" and complete the Themes of Adversity graphic organizer.

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