Examples from Life Today | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M2B:U2:L11

Examples from Life Today

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite text-based evidence to support an analysis of literary text. (RL.6.1)
  • I can write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. (W.6.1)
  • I can produce clear and coherent writing that is appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (W.6.4)
  • With support from peers and adults, I can use a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing. (W.6.5)

Supporting Targets

  • I can select examples from today to support the text evidence I have selected.
  • I can explain why I have chosen the evidence and examples from life today to support my claim.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for "A Little Background: The Crusades" (from homework)
  • Are We Medieval?: Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Reader: "A Little Background: The Crusades" (7 minutes)

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Determining Examples from Life Today (10 minutes)

B. Explaining the Thinking (15 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Pair Share (8 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Read "Isobel, the Lord's Daughter" and complete the Themes of Adversity graphic organizer.

  • In this lesson, students further refine the examples from life today that they have chosen to support their claim. Remind students to, when possible, choose examples from life today that they have personal experience with, or know people who have experience, to make their claim stronger.
  • As with the previous lesson, students will need to refer to all of the Themes of Adversity graphic organizers they have completed throughout the unit, including Lesson 10 homework. At the end of the lesson they are given a new blank Themes of Adversity graphic organizer to complete their homework (for "Isobel, the Lord's Daughter").
  • Post: Learning targets.

Materials

  • Are We Medieval?: Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer (from Lesson 9; completed version based on the model essay; one to display)
  • Are We Medieval?: Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer (from Lesson 10; one per student and one to display)
  • Themes of Adversity graphic organizers (completed throughout the unit for each of the monologues read)
  • Document camera
  • Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for "Isobel, the Lord's Daughter" 

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: "A Little Background: The Crusades" (7 minutes)

  • Ask students to take out their Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for  "A Little Background: The Crusades" and share their responses with another student; they should make revisions to their graphic organizer as necessary.
  • Select volunteers to share out. Listen for:

-    The theme of adversity is that crusaders faced death.

-    The text evidence they may cite for this comes from Paragraph 6: "... often slaughtering fellow Christians along the way," and "Most of them starved, froze to death, or were sold into slavery."

-    The group of people affected was those who went on the crusades.

  • Ask pairs to discuss:

* "Is this an adversity we face today?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses. They may compare this adversity to soldiers going to war today.
  • Opening the lesson by asking students to share their homework makes them accountable for completing it. It also gives you the opportunity to monitor which students are not doing their homework.
  • Consider pairing ELLs who speak the same first language in order to deepen their discussion and understanding.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (5 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and invite them to read along with you:

* "I can select examples from today to support the text evidence I have selected."

*  "I can explain why I have chosen the evidence and examples from life today to support my claim."

  • Remind students that in the previous lesson, they looked across their Themes of Adversity graphic organizers for each of the monologues they have read in order to decide on a claim, choose two adversities to discuss, and identify the text evidence most compelling in explaining those adversities.
  • Tell students that in this lesson, they are going to finish filling out the Are We Medieval?: Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer.
  • Invite them to read what they have filled out on their organizer so far to remind themselves of the claim they are making and the adversities they have chosen.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Determining Examples from Life Today (10 minutes)

  • Invite students to take out the Themes of Adversity graphic organizers relevant to the adversities they have chosen. Remind them that there should be examples from life today in their explanation at the bottom of the organizers, but they don't have to use those examples if they think of more relevant and compelling examples. Remind students to, when possible, use examples they have experience with. This will allow them to provide those personal examples in their essay.
  • Tell students that they need to think of one example from life today for each adversity. Remind them:

-    That if their claim is that we do still struggle with similar adversities to the people in the Middle Ages, the examples from life today that they provide should show evidence of that adversity

-    That if their claim is that we don't struggle with similar adversities to the people in the Middle Ages, the examples from life today that they provide should show how those adversities are no longer an issue for us

  • Give students 5 minutes to discuss their examples from life today with an elbow partner.
  • Refocus whole group and cold call students to share.
  • Question them to provide immediate feedback on the examples they suggest. For example:

* "How do you know about that example? Is it something you or someone you know has experienced?"

* "How does it support your claim?"

  • Using a document camera, model how to fill out the "Examples from life today" boxes on the Are We Medieval?: Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer started as a model in the previous lesson.
  • Invite students to record their examples on their graphic organizers but to ignore the final "Explaining the thinking ..." box. They will address this box later.
  • Circulate to support students as necessary.
  • Consider grouping those students who may need additional support in writing on their organizers. Invite them to say their ideas aloud before recording them on their graphic organizers.

B. Explaining the Thinking (15 minutes)

  • Focus students' attention on the final box of the Are We Medieval?: Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer, the "Explaining the thinking" box.
  • Display the completed Are We Medieval?: Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer (from Lesson 9, based on the model essay). and invite students to reread what is recorded and to focus on the "Explaining the thinking" box. Ask them to discuss with an elbow partner:

* "How did the author of the model essay complete this graphic organizer to explain the evidence they used?"

  • Select volunteers to share their ideas. Listen for them to say that the author provides evidence from the text to explain the opportunities available in the Middle Ages and provides examples from life today to explain why this is no longer an accessible opportunity.
  • Invite students to spend 5 minutes explaining the thinking about their own evidence to their partner. Circulate to listen to them. Ask:

* "How does your text evidence support your claim?"

* "How do your examples from life today support your claim?"

* "How do your text evidence and your examples from life today work together?"

  • Refocus the whole group and select volunteers to share their ideas. Ask students who share the same questions in order to provide immediate feedback on the explanation.
  • Finally, model how to fill out the "Explaining the thinking ..." box.
  • Invite students to record their thinking on there are We Medieval?: Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizers (which they began working on in Lesson 10).
  • Circulate to support students in recording their examples from life today on their graphic organizers. Continue to ask the probing questions provided above, to challenge and guide students to support their claims with evidence. 
  • When reviewing graphic organizers or recording forms, consider using a document camera to display them for students who struggle with auditory processing.
  • Providing models of expected work supports all learners, but especially those who are challenged.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Pair Share (8 minutes)

  • Invite students to pair up with someone else to share their completed Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer.
  • Direct them to focus on the "Explaining the thinking" box on their partner's organizer. Ask:

* "Does the choice of text evidence and example from real life make sense in support of the claim when the thinking has been explained?"

* "Is there anything that doesn't make sense or that you don't understand? How would you improve it? What do you need to know?"

  • Invite students to revise the ideas on their organizers based on their partner's feedback.
  • Distribute a Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for "Isobel, the Lord's Daughter."

Homework

Homework
  • Read "Isobel, the Lord's Daughter" and complete the Themes of Adversity graphic organizer.

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